Posts Tagged With: New Gloucester

Fort Williams to be Unearthed?

Dining with Antiques – Christmas Rosettes
In the 1840s and 1850s, Scandinavian settlers brought to the United States the tradition of making an assortment of delicious Christmas cookies using open fireplaces and cast iron implements. Over time, cultures blended into America’s melting pot and traditions became diluted, but these fascinating cookie-making tools can still be found, hidden among the Dutch ovens, skillets and other cast iron miscellany on tables at outdoor flea markets. The items, resembling small branding irons (with screw-on “brands”), are used to make rosettes, a favorite Nordic Christmas treat. Check out Worthologist Liz Holderman’s primer on these vintage kitchen implements, as well as a traditional recipe for those interested in trying to make them. Read “Dining with Antiques – Christmas Rosettes”

History buried at Fort Williams Park


The park’s charitable foundation plans to explore the possibility of uncovering a buried gun battery.

CAPE ELIZABETH – Large interpretive signs help explain Battery Blair to visitors at the town’s Fort Williams ParkJoe Edgar says much more interesting things are under those visitors’ feet. Edgar is a director of the Fort Williams Charitable Foundation, which has raised more than $36,000 for an engineering study to determine whether a buried section of the gun battery — which includes the ammunition magazines, plotting rooms, and space for tool storage, generators and latrines — can stand the stress of being uncovered.

“Spend Christmas in Jail!”

The Ellsworth Historical Society will again be having their annual open house and “Old Fashioned Christmas” with free admission to the museum on December 3, 11:00-3:00 at the home of the Society” The Old Hancock County Jail”, 40 State Street Ellsworth next to the Ellsworth Library.

The 1886 home of the Sherriff will decorated for the holidays with hot mulled cider and cookies. Guests will be welcome to tour the 1886 home of the Hancock County Sherriff’s of the past and see how they spent their day-to-day lives and tending the prisoners in the jail. Guests will also be allowed to tour the Sherriff’s office and the cellblock of so many of our notorious Ellsworth prisoners!

A special exhibit will also be on display “A Soldiers Christmas” that will display military items from the archives of the society as well as items on loan. One very special exhibit we will have this year is a recent donation to the society of a 12 lb British Canon Ball that was shot at a Ellsworth Barn on the Union River believed from the Revolutionary War period. So many Ellsworth boys were not home for the holidays so we felt it was important to show our support and remember the soldiers of Ellsworth at this special time of year.

The society continues its goal of preserving the artifacts of Ellsworth History and as always needs your support. Donations are welcome and may be sent to The Ellsworth Historical Society PO Box 355 Ellsworth, Me 04605. If you have items to donate or any questions, please contact Terri Weed Cormier at 667-8235 or Linda Grindle at 667-5716. The society is currently looking for glass locking display cabinets to display items securely, if you have one to donate please contact us. Thank you and we look forward to seeing you all at the Open House for some cider and cookies and lots of reminiscing about Ellsworth’s past.

Museums of Old York

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

December

3rd Join us this Saturday for A Christmas Tea at Jefferds Tavern.

As a part of the annual Festival of Lights celebration in York Village, Museums of Old York hosts a favorite holiday tradition at historic Jefferds Tavern from noon until 4 p.m. on Sat., Dec. 3. This yuletide fest, managed by volunteer Michele LaBranche, offers traditional Victorian-style holiday cheer to the whole family. Candlelight, a cozy fire, shining silver, delicate teacups and holiday greens set the stage in the Tavern. But the desserts are really the highlight of the afternoon!

Created by local bakers and talented volunteers, this year’s menue of tasty treats includeds: Apple Crisp, Harvest Pumpkin Pie, Cheesecake, Chocolate Cake, Raspberry Almond Pie, Lemon Pie, Fluffy Peanut Butter Pie, and Indian Pudding. Enjoy the ambiance, company of friends and delicious desserts as you warm yourself by the fire. The last sitting will be at 3:30 p.m. Admission is $6 and includes a choice of two desserts and tea. No charge for children under age 5 and no reservation required.

14th Candle Dipping and Holiday Decor. Without electricity how did people light their homes at night? With candles of course! Dip your own candles for when the power goes out this winter or as a centerpiece for a holiday dinner. Create colorful curled candles, string cranberries and make a decoration for your window or Christmas tree. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Registration required, ages 8 and up, $10 ($8 members).

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Bringing in the Swedes

30th Anniversary Celebration, New Sweden, 1900

The settlement of the Swedish colony in Aroostook County in the 1870s is a remarkable story. Political leaders, spurred by the Homestead Act and led by W.W. Thomas, actively recruited Swedish immigrants to northern Maine, both to encourage economic development and to secure the northern border with Canada. By the 1890s, nearly 1,500 Swedish immigrants had settled in Aroostook County and established a vibrant community that remains strong to this day.

View the exhibit from Maine History Online for an overview. To explore the story further, visit the website a local team from New Sweden developed through the Maine Community Heritage Project.

TRAVELIN’ MAINE(RS): Head to New Gloucester and have yourself a Merry Shaker
Kennebec Journal
Shaker Village includes a store with many interesting products, a fascinating museum, a craft store with locally made crafts from lamps to baskets to cheese balls, a farm with sheep and goats and several historical buildings

Farmington Historical Society to sell wreaths
Lewiston Sun Journal
Along with a parade and other activities, the Titcomb House Museum is open from 9:30 am to 3 pm All proceeds support the Farmington Historical Society’s mission of preserving Farmington’s history and maintenance of the Titcomb House and North Church

Schooner Bowdoin’s Untold Story Subject of Upcoming Castine Exhibit
The Maritime Executive (press release)
The untold story of Maine Maritime Academy’s (MMA) historic schooner Bowdoin will be illuminated in an upcoming exhibit at the Castine Historical Society scheduled for the summer of 2012. The exhibit, entitled “Schooner Bowdoin on the Greenland Patrol”

Leeds Historical Society views Harry Cochrane Murals
Lewiston Sun Journal
LEEDS — Members of the Leeds Historical Society met recently at the old Methodist Church on Quaker Ridge with artisan Tony Castro from New Gloucester. Castro has worked for more than 25 years in the field of decorative painting, and some of Maine’s…

Maine fish passage restoration effort get $92K grant
The Republic
Maine Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe says the $92505 grant is going to the Nobleboro Historical Society. Through the years, the towns have undertaken several

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Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Museums of Old York, stories, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A New Old/Maine Train Gets Rolling

Maine excursion train set to roll Downeast

ELLSWORTH, Maine (AP) — A new excursion train is set to begin carrying passengers in eastern Maine’s Hancock County. The Downeast Scenic Railroad made its inaugural run on Saturday from Ellsworth for some of the 75 volunteers who…

Shaker Village draws visitors on Open Farm Day

Brooke Rich of Westbrook and her 2-year-old son Gavin watch honeybees at work in their hive on Sunday during Open Farm Day at the Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village in New Gloucester. Scores of visitors walked the grounds of the village looking over exhibits and crafts produced at the farm.

Farmington’s ‘Great Fire of 1886’ on display during Summer Fest

FARMINGTON — An exhibit featuring a devastating fire, Farmington’s “Great Fire of 1886,” will be on display July 30 and 31 at the North Church on High Street as part of downtown Farmington’s Summer Fest. The Farmington Historical Society will display pictures of the downt…

Banners’ sale concerns state arts community

By: Bob Keyes; A trade group’s decision to sell promotional material from the 1800s puts ‘cultural artifacts’ at risk, critics say.

Saving corn, one seed at a time

WILTON — For just a few days last week, when the sun was just up and the dew still wet, Pamela Prodan was out in her corn patch, doing her small part to preserve an heirloom variety that likely was grown in this region by the Abenaki.

Peak your interest: Island beauty and fun 15 minutes from Portland … if the Umbrella Cover Museum isn’t enough

I’m on the top deck of a ferry heading back to the Portland mainland, and the sun is setting behind the skyline. Beside me, 5-year-old Meredith Tierney-Fife is watching the boats come and go in Casco Bay. She is returning from a day on Peaks Island with her mother, Josie, and her sisters, 9…

Reconstruction at Norlands

A crew from Krete Hogs in Turner remove the forms for the new farmer’s cottage at Washburn-Norlands Living History Center in Livermore on Thursday. The foundation for the cottage and barn is finished and construction of the cottage is scheduled to be completed by February. The cottage and barn …

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From the MHS…

Wednesday, August 4, 5pm
COMING HOME?


A Poetry Reading by Estha Weiner and Betsy Sholl, Poet Laureate of Maine
Estha Weiner brings her newest book, Transfiguration Begins At Home (Tiger Bark Press 2009) back home to Portland, to read with Betsy Sholl.  Hear the poets, who first met at The Stonecoast Writers Conference, weave their friendship and their poems as they consider how “home” shapes and shifts over time.  Maine, of course, plays a key role in that: Estha, a Portland native, moved away to go to college while Betsy moved here 27 years ago. Book signing to follow.

 
Wednesday, August 4, 9:30am-12:30pm
MAINE REVISED AND REVISITED:
A Poetry and Writing Workshop with Estha Weiner
This multi-genre 3-hour writing workshop welcomes your poems, short fiction, plays, and non-fiction. Its only requirement is a fresh vision of Maine, past or present, an attentive ear and eye, and supportive feedback for fellow writers.  (If you have work that has nothing to do with Maine, that’s OK too.)  We will read and discuss each other’s work, discuss the writing process, and participants will receive careful, helpful feedback, towards revision. Please bring 11 copies of your work. We may add a short in-class exercise or two, and discuss how you go through your day as a writer, even if you think you can’t!  Registration required by Friday, July 30. Fee: $100/person. MHS members/students: $75/person.esthalynne@hotmail.com

For more information or to register, please email Estha Weiner at:

Estha Weiner is co-editor and contributor to Blues for Bill: A Tribute to William Matthews (Akron Poetry Series, 2005), and author of The Mistress Manuscript (Book Works, 2009) and newly published Transfiguration Begins At Home (Tiger Bark Press, 2009). In the Weather of the World is forthcoming from Ireland’s Salmon Press in 2011.  Her poems have appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines. including The New Republic and Barrow Street.  She won a 2005 Paterson Poetry Prize, a 2008/9 nomination for a Pushcart Prize, and  a 2008 Visiting Scholar at Stratford’s Shakespeare Institute. Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at City College of NY, Estha serves on the Board of Slapering Hol Press, Hudson Valley Writers Center and is founding director of Sarah Lawrence College NY Writers Nights.
 
Betsy Sholl, Poet Laureate of Maine, has published seven collections of poetry, most recently Rough Cradle (Alice James Books, 2009). Don’t Explain won the 1997 Felix Pollak Prize from the University of Wisconsin, and her book The Red Line won the 1991 AWP Prize for Poetry. Her chapbooks include Pick A Card, winner of the Maine Chapbook Competition in 1991, and Betsy Sholl: Greatest Hits, 1974-2004 (Pudding House Publications). She was a founding member of Alice James Books and published three collections with them: Changing Faces, Appalachian Winter, and Rooms Overhead. Among her awards are a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts, and two Maine Writer’s Fellowships. Her work has been included in many anthologies and magazines. Betsy has been a visiting poet at the University of Pittsburgh and Bucknell University. She lives in Portland, Maine, and teaches at the University of Southern Maine and in the MFA Program of Vermont College.

For more information:

Maine Historical Society

489 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101

207–774–1822

http://www.mainehistory.org

http://www.mainememory.net

The Maine Historical Society promotes the understanding and enjoyment of Maine history.

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Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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