Posts Tagged With: museums

Rusticating in Bygone Maine

Maine has a long history as being a place to get away to, and in some cases, we have surpassed the success of many better known vacation spots. During the latter 1800’s into the early 1900’s rusticating in Maine was in vogue. People came from all over the world to relax in our rustic environment, and as a result, several world class tourist spots were developed.

One of them, the Poland Spring Inn, as shown in this postcard of mine boasted of its miraculous spring water. The water was so popular it was bottled for distribution in the old familiar green bottles with the green labeling.

Most of the older mega hotels, if you want to call them that have disappeared, but you can still find remnants of many by way of old advertising, postcards and various publications describing their offerings. Things have changed over the course of the years, so we now see a differing sort of entertainment to keep visitors happy.

It used to be common to find people boating, or taking hikes through the woods or along a shoreline, enjoying the sights to be found in the world of nature. Those same sights are still there, however, and can be found again by those of an adventurous nature.

Another world famous resort was the Kineo House, which could be found on Moosehead Lake in the Greenville area. This ca. 1850 picture to the right shows the hotel before its latter additions. The Kineo House was a grand destination for those sportsmen who wanted to get back into the big woods for fishing and hunting, and there are many stories of the successful hunts that could be had with the right guide. Fishermen were able to catch overflowing strings of various species that could be found not only in Moosehead Lake itself, but from the many streams and brooks running into the lake.

Along the coastline, dozens of old hotels lined the beaches, and southern Maine offered miles of sandy beaches for the travelers enjoyment. At one time, Old Orchard Beach recorded more visitors than the famed beaches of Atlantic City in New Jersey, and surpassed by far the then newly marketed California shoreline.

Bar Harbor has become a locale enticing the rich and famous from around the world, and many of the one time visitors have become seasonal residents here in Maine, all due to our climate and abundant resources. In those days, coming to Maine for a vacation was referred to as ‘rusticating’. It was a combination of roughing it in the woods while living elegantly, so to speak.

It amazes me today to read of the accoutrements carried into the woods by folks in those days, setting up a rough camp with all the comforts of home. It makes me wonder at times where all the people came from to tote all of the equipment into the woods. Hotels were generally advertised as having all of the amenities one could wish for on their vacation, some even boasting of hot baths.

Classy restaurants could be found in most of the better hotels, with some of them gaining quite a reputation for their culinary flare and style. No matter how you slice the pie, Maine was the place to go when you wanted to get away. In spite of the changing times, you can still get away in Maine today, whether you want to get out into the deep woods, or relax by the seaside in a comfortable resort. And while you’re visiting, there are many museums and historical societies you see to enhance your vacation if you are indeed a history buff.

We are coming into a new year, and with every new year comes a new set of hoops to jump through. It is no different for these organizations, and every one of them, from the Maine State Historical Society down to the smallest village historical society you can find, needs your help to survive. Please visit them, and see if you can help them out by either a donation of cash, or maybe even volunteering some time in this new year. You might be surprised at what you can learn about our past!

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Categories: historical societies, Maine, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

Note: If you have problems with the links, simply cut/copy and paste into your browser to open them.

Adelbert Ames and His Recollection of the Attempted Robbery in Northfield

Adelbert Ames was born in Rockland, ME, on Oct. 31, 1835. He graduated West Point Academy in 1861 and was commissioned to the 2nd U.S. Artillery and fought in the First Battle of Bull Run where he earned the Medal of Honor. He was later reassigned to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862 where he fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg…

Hurricanes of New England
Maps are available at the Weare Historical Society if you’d like to walk through … on record as the costliest and deadliest storm in New England history…

Old house requires special, loving care
I have had the privilege of … In the end, they offered the house to the Norway Historical Society…

Audience Calendar
Illustrated Lecture: History of Silk in America, Nancy Greenleaf and Sally Williams, Hiram Historical Society, free. 625-4762. 2:30 pm Saturday. …

Bangor Museum and History Center getting a museum makeover
A week after selling a rare … And with the Massachusetts Historical Society, which already has volumes one …

Three Chums tell tales of friendship at Lovell’s Brick Church Sept. 9
Gilman, a New Hampshire storyteller who periodically wanders into Maine… Baked Bean Awareness Month speaker for the Fryeburg Historical Society. …

Prospect News
The Prospect Historical Society will hold a meeting Sept.12th. in the Town Hall at 7:00 PM. Will be discussing the final Yard Sale at the Marsh School…

Publication on Dover-Foxcroft will be a genealogist’s treasure
The couple has long been involved with the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society and its home at the Observer building. Nancy is former president of MGS, and Jack is the current president. The Maine Genealogical Society produces its special publications …

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

It has taken more than 10 years, but recent place name changes approved by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names have removed the final racial slurs from Maine maps. The six locations, all in Aroostook County, are now named Scopan, Scopan Inlet, Scopan Knob, Scopan Lake, …

Archaeologists in Illinois dig to find civilization that vanished

The largest excavation of a prehistoric site in the country is poised to solve a riddle about Illinois prehistory that has lingered for a century — where did the Mississippians go? And why? An enormous dig of a village site first inhabited about 1050 A.D. is providing so much data and so many artifacts that archaeologists are daring to speculate that basic questions about the Mississippians will finally be answered.

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From Museums of Old York:

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

PLEASE NOTE:
The “History Challenge” programs previously scheduled for Thursday, September 1 and Thursday, September 8 at 7 p.m. in The Parsons Center have been cancelled.
Our regular programming and exhibits in The Parsons Center will be suspended from September 1 through September 11 so that we may bring you The Fourth Annual Antiques Show!

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

19 “The Country Heer is Plentiful” exhibit of Trade, Religion and Warfare and Southern Maine 1631-1745 resumes in the upstairs gallery at The Parsons Center during regular museum hours.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Click here to view the scrumptious menu on our website. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany the hearth-cooked meal. Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Seating is limited to twenty and reservations are required. Please email Richard Bowen or call (207) 363-4974 to make your reservation by September 21.

26 Needle Wizards. Every Monday morning starting the 26th of September. Join our Needle Wizards as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information email Cindi at registrar@oldyork.org.

29 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

October

3 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apple, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Remick Barn. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. $5 for teens and adults/ $15 for families. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

31 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

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From the Maine Historical Society:

MHS News

New Exhibit Explores One Way High Fashion Came to Maine

The new exhibit in the Lecture Hall Gallery, “Having in Paris a Great Success”: French Fashion, 1928-1936, features sheets from Paris fashion houses that demonstrate one source of fashion inspiration for well-to-do women in Maine during the 1920s and 30s. The sheets, which are drawn from MHS’s Mildred G. Burrage Collection, include beautiful hand-drawn illustrations of the latest styles and fabric samples.

This show is mounted in conjunction with Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In, our current museum exhibit.


Fall Program Highlights

Tuesday, October 4, 12pm
Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Thursday, October 13, 7pm
Book Event: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm
Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Wednesday, October 26, 7pm

Book Event: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Presenter: Colin Woodard, Author

Thursday, November 10, 7pm
In Partnership with the Colonial Dames in Maine
Tales from an Art Detective: Tracing Nazi-era Provenance at the MFA

Presenter: Victoria Reed, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Categories: antiques, archeology, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, indians, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maine Museum Highlights for June

From the Museums at Old York

Junior Docents Back for the Summer

This summer we have fifteen Junior Docents ranging in age from 12-18. Seven of these students will be joining us for the first time this summer from Wolfsboro and Stratham NH, and Kittery ME. The rest of the teens, all from York have been with the program for two to six summer, finding time to volunteer at the Museums between summer sports and part time jobs. New and returning docents will be busy once again giving costumed interpretation to visitors, working on colonial crafts, creating an exhibit for the York Public Library and assisting with the Morning Adventures for children. For more information about the Junior Docents Program, please visit our website.

Museums Open for the Season

Museum Hours: Monday through Saturday, 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
(NOTE: museums are closed on July 4 for the holiday)
Library and Archives Hours: Thursdays and Fridays 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., 12:30 p.m. – 4 p.m., and Saturdays 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Tours: 10:00 a.m. Elizabeth Perkins House; 11:00 a.m. Emerson-Wilcox House; 12:00 p.m. Ramsdell House, 1:00 p.m. Emerson-Wilcox House,
2:30 p.m. Elizabeth Perkins House.

For more information, please call the Visitor Center (207) 363-1756 or visit our website.

Programs for Kids and Adults

For a complete and up-to-date calendar of Museums of Old York programs see our website.

July
4 Museums of Old York are closed for the holiday

5 (thru August 25) Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs
Our summer camp programs for children build on the core curriculum of our school programs and provide children with learning experiences in a fun and supportive environment. Download a brochure and sign-up form for Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs for Children.
Reservations are required for all programs. Programs run 9am-12pm and cost $23 ($20 members) unless otherwise indicated. For more information email Zoe Keefer-Norris or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting.

7 “History Challenge!” Game Show
Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answe questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Contact Richard Bowen at rbowen@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting to register your team. Meet at 7:00 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

10 Lost York: The History That Nature Has Reclaimed
Mt. Agamenticus hike. See the remnants of the WWII military installation and the Big A Ski Area from the 1960s-70s. Explore cellar holes and rock walls from the past. Discuss the legends of St. Aspinquid and topics related to local Native Americans and their customs and rituals. Contact Richard Bowen at rbowen@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting to reserve your space or to get more information. Meet at Mt. A summit. 2:00 p.m. Sunday, July 10.

22 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern
Join us for a summer sampler of local seafood, beef, fresh vegetables, and desserts of local fresh fruits. Weather permitting, we will move outside to the bluestone terrace. We will supply all of the food, so please feel free to bring your own favorite summer beverage. Friday, July 22, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. $30 per person; $25 for members. Reservations required. Contact Richard Bowen at rbowen@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting to reserve your space or to get more information.

28 History Brought to Life
Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

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From the Penobscot Marine Museum

Penobscot Marine Museum has added a new picture framing department to serve the museum’s own needs and well as those of retail customers. Professional framer Lin Calista, formerly of Frame by Frame in Searsport, has joined the staff to manage the shop.

The museum has an ongoing need to mount and frame photos, paintings and other objects for its collections, travelling exhibits and educational programs. This new capability enables us to provide retail customers with the same services. A range of framing materials and styles is available, from standard-quality to archival. Museum members and artists having their own work framed receive a 10 percent discount.

Hours

Tuesday through Friday, 10-4,

Saturday 10- 2.

(Closed Sunday and Monday)

The Museum Framer at Penobscot Marine Museum

Located in the Admission Center, 40 E. Main St., Searsport, 207-548-0334

email
www.museumframer.com

Year 75 is Under Way – Help Us Celebrate with a Sponsorship

This year’s headline exhibit is 75 for 75, featuring 75 items from the museum’s 75 years. Click here for a look at every item in the exhibit, and join us in celebrating our three-quarters-of-a-century milestone by sponsoring one or more items. Your name will appear beside the exhibit item and online (of course we’ll also respect requests for anonymity), and you’ll be helping us pave the way toward a full century.

Free Admission for Military Families

Active-duty military personnel and their families now enjoy free admission at Penobscot Marine Museum, due to our new “Blue Star Museums” program.

“Penobscot Marine Museum is proud to give a little something back to the men and women of our nation’s armed forces in recognition of their dedicated service to our country,” said Executive Director Liz Lodge. “We look forward to welcoming them and their families with free admission for the entire year.”

More than 1,300 museums nationwide are participating in

Blue Star Museums, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and Blue Star Families. For the complete list of participating museums, visit www.arts.gov.bluestarmuseums.

Art Sought for ShipShapes

An exhibit of whimsical boat-themed sculpture is going on display at Penobscot Marine Museum, and the public is invited to contribute additional pieces to the community art project.

Called ShipShapes, the exhibit features boat models made from a variety of unexpected materials: buttons, felt, cardboard, costume jewelry, alphabet blocks, sea shells, bottle caps, or just about anything that spurs the artist’s imagination. Any kind of boat or ship, real or imaginary, can be depicted. The only requirements are that it stands up by itself and fits into an imaginary one-foot cube. Click here for more

Lighthouse Challenge Includes PMM

The Midcoast Maine Lighthouse Challenge is a two-day self-guided driving tour of Midcoast Maine’s lighthouses (Dyce Head, Fort Point, Grindle Point, Rockland Breakwater, Owls Head, Marshall Point and Pemaquid Point) and the Maine Lighthouse Museum. It’s a once-a-year opportunity to visit and climb the towers of seven lighthouses in one weekend.

Penobscot Marine Museum is a “bonus site” on the tour, and participants who visit us will receive a small memento. More information.

More Events and Exhibits

Searsport Lobsterboat Races and Antique Power Day

A town-wide day of activities: Lobsterboat races, antique engine and lobsterboat exhibit, crafts for children, rowing race, craft sale and more. 7/9, all day

Penobscot Bay Day – 75th Birthday Edition

Free museum admission, birthday cake, crafts, live music, balloons, presentations, demonstrations, the Grand Opening of the new Seabag Visible Storage Center, and more. 7/23, all day

And We’ll Be Exhibiting at:

Maine Boats Homes & Harbors Show, Rockland, Aug. 12-14

Belfast Harbor Fest, Aug. 20

Camden Windjammer Festival, Sept. 2-4

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From the Maine Historical Society

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit: Working Women of the Old Port

This exhibit explores the many places and ways that women worked in Portland in the early 20th century–from canneries and schools, to department stores. The exhibit is based on the book, Working Women of the Old Port: A Portland Women’s History Trail. This self-guided tour was developed by the Portland Women’s History Trail and the USM Department of History. View exhibit. To purchase a copy of the book, click here.

News Feed

MHS receives State Historic Preservation Award for Renovation of

Brown Library and Garden

Maine Preservation has awarded MHS a 2011 Statewide Historic Preservation Honor Award for the restoration and rehabilitation of the Brown Library and Longfellow Garden. The award was presented at a ceremony on June 9 at the Franco-American Heritage Center in Lewiston.

Maine Memory Network Recognized by Family Tree Magazine

Family Tree Magazine has included Maine Memory Network in its annual listing of the 101 best family history websites. Click here to view the full list which will be published in the magazine’s September 2011 issue. Family Tree is America’s largest-circulation genealogy magazine, helping readers discover, preserve, and celebrate their family history.

Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Garden

Open for the Season!

Hours and Tours

Monday-Saturday, 10:30am – 5pm. First tour at 10:30, then tours on the hour.

Sunday, noon – 4pm. Tours on the hour, last tour at 4pm.

Admission*

Members: Free

Adults: $12

Seniors, AAA, Students: $10

Children: $3, Under 6: Free

*Price includes admission to the Museum exhibits and Beat the Heat movies.

The garden is always free and open to the public during business hours.

Categories: Art Exhibit, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, grants, headlines, history, lighthouses, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

L.C. Bates Museum

We have a new link to share with you all to the L.C. Bates Museum, located on the Goodwill-Hinckley School grounds on route 201 in Hinckley. If you’ve driven from Waterville to Skowhegan, you’ve driven right by this stately looking building. I haven’t been up to see them, but hope to do so this year. There are simply too many things going on for me to get to them all, unfortunately. But here’s a brief run down of what they offer up there:

Their websites intro says; The L. C. Bates Museum at Good Will-Hinckley is an early 20th century natural history and cultural museum. It is housed in an historic 1903 Romanesque Revival brick school building. Museum exhibits include Maine natural history, Americana, art, archaeology, minerals, ethnology, and Maine history. Featured museum exhibit tells the history of Good Will-Hinckley and the children who called it home.

 There are nature trails, picnic tables, and an arboretum behind the museum.

 Summer Art Exhibits are held in the museum. Saturdays features Family and Children’s natural history and history workshops and hikes. The Museum offers Outreach and In-House Natural History and Maine History programs for schools and groups and programs for birthday parties
and
scouts.

Here’s the rest of the main story from their front page:

Admission: Adults $3.00, Children up to 17 years $1.00

Open hours: Spring, Summer and Autumn Hours (April until mid-November):

Weds, Thurs, Fri and Sat 10 AM to 4:30PM and Sunday 1 to 4:30 PM and other times by appointment.

 
 

Winter Hours (mid-Nov – March) – Wednesday through Saturday 10AM to 4:30PM and other times by appointment or chance, please call 238-4250

to be sure we are here to greet you in winter. Closed if the roads are snowy. Please note we are not heated in winter! Dress warmly if you come for a visit.

  
 

Self-Guided Outdoor Activities:

Good Will-Hinckley Nature Trails Start Behind the Museum Self-Guided Trail Maps, Children’s Outdoor Discovery Packs, and Museum Animal Discovery Boxes, are available at the museum

Picnic Tables in Arboretum- Carry/In Carry/out

 
 

Museum Gift Shop: Open museum hours. The gift shop features many educational items for curious adults and children, including puppets, books, jewelry, posters,

and natural items such as minerals, shells and fossils. The gift shop has a wide range of prices including 1$ dollar items to allow kids and school groups to shop too!

 
 

Membership and Volunteering: We welcome new museum memberships and volunteers to have fun, share their knowledge and learn while making the L.C.Bates Museum available to central Maine Community. If you have a special interest or talent, please inquire about volunteering.

 
 

The L.C.Bates Museum is located 5 miles north of I 95 exit 133 on Rt. 201halfway between Skowhegan and Fairfield.

 
 

Contact Information

L. C. Bates Museum

At Good Will-Hinckley

Rt 201, PO Box 159, Hinckley, ME 04944

207-238-4250- E-mail- lcbates@gwh.org 

Try to visit and support them if you can, or at the very least check out the web site here. Who knows, maybe you’ll get some vacation ideas for this summer’s fun?

If you have a society, museum or other non-profit history related website and would like to have a link placed in our directory, simply drop me an email at editor@touringmaineshistory.com. As a reminder, I’m planning on beginning a series of highlights of Maine historical organizations, so if you’d like to be in on that project let me know at the same address. And if you have a for profit venue, I’m currently examining advertising possibilities as well.

Categories: antiques, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine things to do, museum news, preservation, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Meeting of the Museums

The hot news in the field of Maine history over the last few days has been the merger of the Maine Maritime Museum over in Bath with the Portland Harbor Museum…

Portland, Bath museums merge to preserve maritime stories

By BDN Staff PORTLAND and BATH, Maine — Portland Harbor Museum has merged with Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, ensuring that the collections of the Portland …

MMM expands its reach

Maine Maritime Museum’s merger with the Portland Harbor Museum is an exciting development that will allow the museum to live up to its name even more fully …

Museums merge

BATH — The Maine Maritime Museum on Monday announced a merger with the Portland Harbor Museum, a deal in which the Bath-based institution will absorb the Portland collection and expand its presence in the state’s largest city…

BNAS museum looks like a go…

Navy tribute effort revs up

BRUNSWICK — Organizers of an effort to establish a Navy museum on Brunswick Naval Air Station property have taxied their fundraising effort to the runway. Adequate funding is all that stands between them and take-off to make their vision become a reality.

In other Maine history news….

Pirates Invade, Find Treasure, And Bandy Cutlasses To The Delight Of All
Once again, Damariscotta is thankful that marauding pillagers of the Pirate Rendezvous left the town in one piece after making landfall on June 12, amidst raised cutlasses, booming cannon fire, and threatened mayhem, all to the giggles and delight of children.
 
Categories: breaking news, events, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, museum news, preservation, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

General Knox and Historical Maine Buildings

Well, I’m back to blogging about Maine history again. For reasons that I won’t mention here, search engine problems drove my ranking to the bottom of the heap. But changes have been made, and hopefully people will begin to find me again. I’ve also decided to change the format of my posting as well, so don’t be surprised that things just don’t seem the same around here anymore.

Fund hike keeps University of Maine museum entry free, an article in the Bangor Daily news relates a good story regarding the UofM’s Art museum. Apparently the Machias Savings Bank has increased its annual gift to the museum to $7500 allowing the museum to offer free admission throughout 2010. Kudos to the Machias Savings Bank for their gift and caring for the arts.

We also saw this past weekend the ending of a piece of Maine history as the last two P3 Orion’s left the Brunswick Naval Air Base ending 60 years of patrolling the Eastern Seaboard and helping to protect our seaways. The base, originally used as a training and stop off base during WWII for US, British and Canadian air force planes, was temporarily closed after the war ended before being converted to Naval use. At its normal level of use, BNAS provided homes and work for about 4,000 employees and their families, providing a great opportunity for the mid coast area by way of economic stability. Too bad the base closed, we’ll miss the Navy greatly.

Champlain’s Valley Voice has a good piece regarding Maine’s own General Henry Knox in From Fort Ticonderoga to Boston: The Wintry Trek of Henry Knox. The story relates to Knox’s efforts to relocate 60 tons of artillery from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston in 1775. WABI has a nice video piece regarding the historic Liberty Hall in Machiasport as the historic Restored Belvedere Tower
cupola was returned to the top of its bell tower. It’s amazing how some of the restoration takes place on these historic properties with all of the details and work it takes to return Maine’s beautiful architecture to where it once was.

Foster’s Daily Democrat reports that tours are now being offered at the historic Hurd Mansion on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 1 to 3 PM at a cost of ten dollars per person. Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., was quoted in the article as saying the Hurd Manor was “the most outstanding example of its style in southern Maine and nowhere in the state does a more impressive Queen Anne—Eastlake residence exist.” The paper also reports that the Sanford
Mill yard makes the National Register,
as the historic property was recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Yard was established by Thomas Goodall in 1867 and became a major source of employment and industry in the area, until it was sold off by Burlington Industries in 1955.

Another couple of interesting articles related to Maine history in that same paper are Ski Museum of Maine and North Berwick Historical Society holding ‘Fireside Chat’
and Funds sought for historic exhibit at North Berwick’s Olde Woolen Mill complex. Ever noticed that some papers place more interest in history than others? I think it’s important to realize that there really is a lot of activity in the preservation and sharing of history here in Maine, but the bulk of it goes on behind the scenes, relatively unnoticed by the public. Fosters Daily Democrat is just one paper that gives these projects and news the coverage they deserve. Three cheers for Fasters, and I hope they can continue with their efforts in these days of closing newspapers.

As I gear up for the coming year, I’ve decided to do my column on a weekly basis which will give me more time to get around and visit. Writing as much as I do consumes a lot of time, so I really need to begin concentrating on various projects, and some of these projects will be terminated. However, I’m still here, and things will progress. If you have some news you’d like to share, enter it into the comments or email it to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com and I’ll consider including it. Also, if you have a link to place on the links page, or an event for the events page, please feel free to email the information to me at the same address.

Categories: Art Exhibit, events, historic buildings, historic preservation, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maine History Headline Roundup for August 25 2009

Hey Everybody!

Welcome to my new blog site at WordPress! You’ll find all of the same news and views on Maine history, as well as the events and historical societies that celebrate our heritage. If you are new to Touring Maine’s History, this is a no profit attempt to spread the word about Maine history by sharing headlines and articles from around the state of Maine that pertain to the area of historic preservation and recreation. As always, if your society or organization has an event to announce or news to share, email your entry to dlsoucy@remembermemedia.com, and don’t forget to put a description in the subject box or the spam killer will dump your email. Also, for more on Maine history and the projects we are working on, don’t forget to visit us at http://www.remembermemedia.com.

River Views: Mill loss hits area

Dave Sargent-Whenever history goes up in flames, the loss is felt very deeply and very differently throughout a community. It was the recent Cowen Mill conflagration that kindled many local memories. A few years ago, fire also destroyed the adjoining W.S. Libbey Mill, and both of the familiar massive brick structures on the Lewiston side of the Androscoggin River’s Great Falls have disappeared….

Ghost seekers hold investigation in Farmington cemeteries.

LSJ-Henry Farrington from Central Maine Paranormal Investigations takes photographs in Riverside Cemetery in Farmington Saturday night as he and other members of the group fanned out in search of ghosts….

Historical sites to be mapped and marketed

LSJ-FARMINGTON — The trails and historical sites of greater Franklin County will be explored, mapped and put up on a Web site with the help of a Maine Community Foundation grant.

Healthy Community Coalition has received a $75,000 grant from the foundation’s Environmental Funders Network “Quality of Place” Fund for a project that focuses on health and the local natural environment. It’s a three-year grant, and as long as funding is available, HCC will receive $75,000 each year, Executive Director Heather Davis said….

The parade rolled on in Phillips despite the weather

LSJ-Rain didn’t stop the opening of the 51st annual Phillips Old Home Days Parade Friday night, but heavy rains scattered participants and viewers before the parade was over. With the theme, “What can you do with duct tape?” this young man is prepared for Saturday’s bathtub races at for 3 p.m. on Toothaker Pond in Phillips. A variety of activities are scheduled throughout the weekend.

Historic Montpelier Celebrates 195th Anniversary of George Washington Portrait Rescue from the White House

Montpelier James Madison’s Montpelier today will celebrate the legacy of slave and freedman Paul Jennings with an exclusive White House visit and walking tour of Washington, D.C. for his descendants. Family members of the former slave, who helped First Lady Dolley Madison rescue the portrait of George Washington before the White House burned in 1814, will gather on the 195th anniversary of its rescue to learn more about their ancestor from one of the nation’s leading Paul Jennings experts. The Montpelier Foundation, steward of James and Dolley Madison’s Orange, Virginia home, has organized the historic event.

“James Madison’s Montpelier is committed to discovering and authentically presenting the entire history of the Montpelier community,” said Michael C. Quinn, president of the Montpelier Foundation. “In Madison’s time there were only a handful of white people, but more than 100 Black people living on the plantation at any one time. We want to find that lost history and share it with the American people. To do so, we have begun a comprehensive research effort—because the stories of these individuals are not African-American history; they are American history.”

http://www.bangordailynews.com/detail/117581.html Marking end of era, last boat launched at Southwest Harbor shop…Called ‘a national treasure’ for his design and building skills, Ralph Stanley will sell his interest to his son. http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/elink/?278942

Penobscot Narrows Bridge shut down after bomb scare

PROSPECT, Maine — A bomb threat at the Penobscot Narrows Bridge Observatory shut down traffic on the span connecting Waldo and Hancock counties Sunday afternoon and caused the evacuation of the … more

 

Events and Happenings…

Alfred Shaker Museum:

Shaker Knit Hat using Shaker Yarn with instructor Barbara Carlson

Saturday, August 29, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Cost: $25.00

Register: Barbara Carlson 207-490-1646

 

 

Maine Historical Society invites you to…
Thursday, September 24 
7:30am-6:00pm
 
Research Trip to the National Archives

Spend a day doing research at the National Archives in Waltham, MA.  Located just outside of Boston, NARA’s Northeast Region facility is among New England’s renowned research facilities for research into local, regional, and national history. 

Walter V. Hickey, Archives Specialist, NARA, will lead an onsite orientation and tour for those who are interested.  Following that, you will be able to search through thousands of records on microfilm, paper, and computer including: Census records covering the entire nation, 1790-1930; Naturalization records; Ship passenger lists; Canadian Border Crossings; Draft, Military Service, and Pension Records; Bounty Land Application Files; and much more.  Participants will also be able to access Footnote.com, Ancestrylibrary.com, and other online databases.

Trip will depart from the parking lot of UNO Chicago Grill’s restaraunt at the Maine Mall at 7:30am and return at 6:00pm.

Space is limited. Pre-registration is required; call 207-774-1822. 
Fee:  $45.00; MHS Members $40.00.

Event Information

When: Thursday, September 24, 2009, 7:30am – 6:00pm

Where: Meet at UNO Chicago Grill’s restaurant parking lot, Maine Mall, South Portland
For more information call 207-774-1822 or email info@mainehistory.org 

 

Greetings, fellow Mainers and New Englanders! Be sure to mark your calendars for the 32nd annual MAINE CARRIAGE DAYS, October 3rd (rain date the 4th).

This year’s event will be held at Topsham Fairgrounds in Topsham, Maine during the height of Maine’s colorful leaf peeping season.

Proximity to Interstate 295 and several other approach routes makes this a very convenient location for attending. This is a the only Maine equine carriage driving event recognized by the American Driving Society, featuring an extensive Pleasure Class lineup as well as Driven Dressage, Cones Course, Marathon Pace, and a Carriage Dog Class.

It is open to all breeds of equine, from large draft to tiny mini horses, even mules and donkeys, and SPECTATORS ARE WELCOME.

The list of awards includes the Col. Paul Downing Trophy and Helen Sanborn Trophy among others.

The Maine Carriage Days event celebrates the traditional art of carriage driving, emphasizes the skills and training necessary to achieve harmonious communication between human and horse, and this event is often attended by people driving antique vehicles or competing with rare breeds of horses.

The event will also include product vendors, educational demonstrations, manufacturers’ displays, and horse-drawn carriage rides provided by Jerome St. Louis of Star Hill Stables driving a gorgeous pair of black Clydesdales.

Spectator Admissions: Adults $3, Children under 12 Free.

Overnight stabling and camping for competitors is available with prior reservation. FMI:organizer@mainecarriagedays.com (207) 865-2047

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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