Posts Tagged With: Museums of Old York

May Sarton 100th Anniversary Event at MoOY

Maine state historian to talk Civil War monuments
Sponsored by the Old Berwick Historical Society, the program is open to the public. Maine’s memorial monuments range in location and age, from Bangor in 1864, while the war was still in progress, to Lisbon in 1999. Many feature standing Union soldiers…

Don Perkins: Freeport takes pride in 1800s warship
This year marks the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, and the Freeport Historical Society is paying tribute with a special program on May 6 titled, “Free Trade and Sailors’ Rights — The War of 1812.” The town has significant connections to this…

Old radar station to become energy park near Moscow, Maine

MOSCOW, Maine — A former U.S. Air Force radar station in Maine’s northern forest has been purchased by a trio of New England companies including Cianbro of Pittsfield, according to a release issued by the companies Monday. The others two companies involved in the purchase…

In death, Portland woman reunited with long-lost love

Teresa Getchell spent decades seeking the truth about her husband’s wartime death in 1969


May Programs From the Museums of Old York:

3-6 May Sarton 100 Anniversary Event. Come celebrate the life and times of Poet and Author May Sarton! In collaboration with the York Public Library and the First Parish Church, the Museums of Old York will be hosting a Centennial Symposium of May Sarton. Registration is filling up so please visit the May Sarton 100 Website for more information and to sign up for the symposium.

6 American Girl Doll Tea – in Jefferds Tavern–KIDS PROGRAM stop in from 2-4 p.m. You and your American Girl Doll are invited to a special Colonial tea. Dress yourself and your doll in your prettiest outfits for an afternoon of proper enjoyment. Sip tea and enjoy cookies in Jefferds Tavern while you learn about the American Girl Felicity who protested tea drinking during the Revolutionary War. Make a mob cap for you and your doll in the Parsons Center program room. $5 per person, tickets available at the door.For more information please contact Zoe Keefer-Norris or call 207-363-4974 x12.

18 Tavern Dinner. Join us for this month’s ever popular historic dinner. Relax and kindle new friendships as colonial ladies prepare a fabulous meal at the hearth. Keep an eye on our website for upcoming menus and announcements of unique entertainments. Sign up soon –these dinners fill fast! $35 ($30 members) at the Parsons Education Center, 6 p.m.

20 Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center. $4 donation appreciated.

28 Buck-a-Building Memorial Day and Paddle-to-the-Sea. Come see the Museum properties, including the the Old Gaol, Emerson-Wilcox House, Elizabeth Perkins House, Jefferds Tavern, the School House, and our Exhibit, “The country heer is plentiful” Trade, Religion and Warfare in York and Southern Maine, open for $1 tours. At 2 p.m. families are invited participate in Paddle-to-the-Sea, a kid-focused program based on Holling Clancy Hollings children’s book by the same name. After hearing the story, build a little boat, label it with your family’s name and launch it down the river. Follow your boat’s journey to the ocean on our blog. $5 per mini boat at the John Hancock Warehouse. 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

News and Updates

Celebration of the Working and Playing Waterfront. A team of staff and trustees are looking ahead to summer and have been working to create an array of programs for 2012 all under the theme York’s rivers and ocean dominate its history. Celebrating our heritage on the water will take many forms. A series of fun and educational programs will be offered throughout June-July-August-September including a river regatta and barbeque, workshops, lectures and demonstrations on the history of lobstering, fishing, boat building, waterfront stories, riverscape painting, the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, and more! A brochure will be coming out in May detailing all the offerings over the summer. See our website for a preliminary schedule of events — stay tuned for updated information.

OAH/NCPH 2012

Highlights of the Organization of American Historians in Milwaukie from the History News Network;


Highlights from the 2012 OAH Annual Meeting in Milwaukee

David A. Walsh

Index

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Gov. William King

Headlines  

History comes to life … and, for the first time, is available online

“It brings history to life,” said Amoroso, a genealogy buff who is director of digital projects for the Maine Historical Society. Amoroso was one of many people who trolled through data on millions of mid-20th century Americans that became publicly…

Fires a part of Fort Kent’s history

“That section of town had never burnt,” Chad Pelletier, president of the Fort Kent Historical Society, said this week. “Those were some of the town’s original buildings from the 1880s.” Pelletier referenced a map from an old Roe & Colby atlas showing…

Events  

April event at Museums of Old York

15 Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. Join this lively bunch on the third Sunday of (almost) every month from 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI, email or call 207-363-4974 ext 13.

18 – 20 April Vacation Camp – History of Science — KIDS PROGRAM 9:30am —1:30PM. Travel back through the ages to experience the world as people begin to understand scientific principles. $65 ($60 members) Ages 5-12. Preregistration is required. All activities take place at the Parsons Center on the corner of York Street and Lindsay Road in York, Maine.

Wednesday: Travel back to ancient Greece where Archimedes proved the use of the lever and pulley. Demonstrate these principles using our giant trebuchet to throw watermelons far into the York River and haul them back using pulleys!

Thursday: Meet 17th century scientist Sir Isaac Newton and help him prove universal gravitation and the laws of motion. Build a marble roller coaster, race toy cars, and build a bottle tornado.

Friday: Experience the world of color! Learn about natural dyes, perform some amazing science experiment, and Tie Dye a t-shirt with chemicals and plants.

20 Tavern Dinner. Traditional hearth cooked meal in a cozy, colonial tavern environment. Menu includes Baked Stuffed Clams, Assorted Pickled Vegetables, Herbed Cheeses, Crackers, and Nuts, Shaker Stew with Chive Dumplings, Fiddleheads Dijon, and Pecan Pie with Whipped Cream. Bring your Favorite Beverage. 6-8 p.m. at Jefferds Tavern, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Cost: $30 members / $35 non-members. Reservations are required. Please email early to reserve your space.

Events at the Maine Historical Society

Tuesday, April 10, 12pm

The Titanic: A Survivor’s Story

Speaker: Dr. Karen Lemke, St. Joseph’s College

Thursday, April 19, 7pm

The Civil War of 1812

Speaker: Dr. Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis

Tuesday, April 24, 7pm

Gateways to Portland: Rebuilding Veterans Memorial and Martin’s Point Bridges

A panel discussion presented in partnership with Greater Portland Landmarks

Spotlight on Maine History

Gov. William Ring.

Portrait ca. 1806 by Gilbert Stuart

THE first Governor of Maine was a son of Richard King, of Scarborough, who is said to have been a man of surpassing natural ability. He was a merchant, and laid the foundation of his fortune from the profits he received as Commissary under Sir William Pepperell.

William King, the seventh child of Richard, was born in Scarborough, Me., February 9, 1768. He was half brother to Rufus King, the statesman, who took such an important part in the formation of our government. William had few advantages in his boyhood. While Rufus was fitting himself at Cambridge for the great eminence he afterwards attained in the nation, William was tending a sawmill in Saco. Notwithstanding his lack of early educational training, his wonderful native ability, his great natural resources, and his strong, energetic intellect forced him early to the front. He set his standard high, and his ambition was untiring and almost unconquerable. Being possessed of wonderful perceptive faculties and a sound judgment, he relied upon these to carry him through, and they never failed him. In native endowment, he was thought to have been superior to his celebrated brother, Rufus.

When a young man Mr. King removed to Topsham, where he lived for a time, but as the Kennebec River offered superior advantages for his lumbering and ship building operations, he removed to Bath in or about the year 1800, where he carried on business very extensively. He afterwards established the town of Kingfield, in Franklin County, of which he was at one time principal owner.

He was a merchant and ship-builder, in which he acquired a large fortune. At one time, he was one of the largest ship-owners in America. In politics, he was a Democrat, and being first in everything he was connected with, he was the leader of his party in Maine—the master mind that managed all the party machinery. He wielded an immense influence in favor of the separation of Maine from Massachusetts. He was President of the Convention that framed the Constitution of the State, and it was his great wisdom and good judgment that directed all the affairs in the formation of the new State.

Mr. King became immensely popular with the people, and was elected the first Governor of Maine by an overwhelming majority. He administered the office with marked ability and to the great satisfaction of the people. Before the expiration of his term, he was appointed a Commissioner under the Spanish Treaty at Washington. Upon receiving this appointment, he resigned the office of Governor of the State and entered upon the duties of his new office, which he also discharged with great ability. He afterwards accepted the appointment as Collector of Customs at Bath, which office he held from 183 1 to 1834. He was a prominent Free Mason and was the first Grand Master of Masons in this State.

Several writers have described his characteristics and personal appearance. John H. Sheppard, Esq., of Boston, said of him: “In his person he was tall and of a striking figure; and with a finely formed head, strongly marked features, high forehead, and black, impending brows, he had a natural and majestic air of command which impressed every beholder with respect.” Deane Dudly wrote; “The sound of his voice seemed to echo grimly from the deep concaves of his eyes, which from under their forest-like brows would sternly look a command that was not to be resisted by ordinary mortals. So conspicuous was he in every circle where he moved, that the most indifferent observer failed not to notice him.”

Mr. King was unfortunate in his last years, not only in the loss of a considerable portion of his property, but in the loss of friends and relatives, which broke down his once splendid mind so that at last his sun went down in darkness. He died at Bath, Me., June 17, 1852, and his wife died in Portland, July 4, 1857.

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L.L. Bean: The stuff of legend

Headlines have been kind of sparse lately, so I have decided to add some material beyond the front pages and event listings in the next few posts. You can still email your events and news that you would like to share at the same old address: editor@remembermemedia.com though.

LL Bean in Freeport is celebrating their 100th anniversary this year and it looks like there will be lots of excitement and a good number of events to spread the pride of reaching that milestone. 100 years is a long time for a business to be open, and I extend my hand in congratulations for their success, and wish them another 100 years. The papers will be full of articles the next few months with lots of information and articles on the birth and growth of this company.

Of course, as we all know, Leo Leonwood Bean designed his first hunting shoe in 1911 because he, like so many of us, was sick and tired of having wet, cold, and aching feet when returning home from his jaunts in the woods. He had some leather tops sewn to a pair of rubbers, and the rest is history. The Bean ad here lists a service whereby a hunter could send in any old pair of boots, and LL Bean’s craftsmen would clean them up, sew on a pair of rubbers and add new laces for the exorbitant cost (at the time) of just $3.40. Bean’s 100th anniversary hunting shoe lists for $139.00 in their catalog. What a difference a century makes!

L.L. Bean: The stuff of legend

FREEPORT — In the rear of a plain-looking white house — not far from the crush of shoppers at L.L. Bean’s retail complex — reside the relics of the company’s century-long history.

Racks of vintage wool coats hang alongside antique fishing poles and knapsacks. L.L. Bean-brand dinnerware sold in the 1950s is here. So are the original paintings used for the covers of Eisenhower-era L.L. Bean catalogs…

History’s hidden in the floorboards

MAPLE GROVE – This small Quaker church just two miles from the Canadian border was likely the last stop on the Underground Railroad for many runaway slaves making their way to freedom, according to historians in the Fort Fairfield area. But it isn’t always easy to find references to it among historical accounts of the Underground Railroad, which helped tens of thousands of slaves gain freedom before slavery was abolished in 1865.

Those who helped the slaves faced jail and heavy fines, so they didn’t tend to leave written records of what they did…

Family history workshop offered at Counting House Museum

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — A public workshop called Researching and Writing Your Family’s History will be held on the second floor of the Counting House Museum at 1 p.m. March 4.

Presented by author Joseph Hardy with genealogist Beth Tykodi, the event is free for members of the Old Berwick Historical Society, and new members are welcome to join at the door. A one-year membership donation is $20 per person or $30 for a family.

Hardy, whose book, “Four American Stories: Emigration and the Lure of the West,” was published this year, will explain how he discovered and developed the stories of his and his wife’s grandparents and their ancestors. He describes his book…

County man collects chain saws of all shapes, styles and colors

ALLAGASH, Maine — Anyone who has spent any time at all in the Maine woods is familiar with the sounds of a gas-powered chain saw. The constant buzz of a saw is the soundtrack to timber operations, woodlot maintenance and firewood gathering. It’s also music to the ears

 

From the Maine Historical Society

Friday, March 2, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk: Take to the Streets

Join us for a festive evening at MHS! Exhibits on display include Take to the Streets! in the Shettleworth Lecture Hall, Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In: Adornment & Identity in Maine in our main gallery, and fantastic work by students in our Local History, Local Schools program in the Showcase Gallery.

Tuesday, March 6, 12pm

Longfellow’s Shadow: A reading of poems by Wesley McNair and Betsy Sholl

Join us to kick off our Richard D’Abate program series with readings by two Maine Poet Laureates. In his tenure at MHS, D’Abate, himself a poet, has embraced MHS’s Longfellow legacy as an opportunity to incorporate literature, the arts, and culture as vital elements of a Maine history that is broadly told and understood. The poets’ readings will reflect themes in Longfellow’s poetry, his stance as a poet, and his attitude toward the social issues of his time.

March Programs at Old York (From their March 2012 newsletter)

2nd Curator’s Potluck. Join us as we thank last year’s donors to our collections. Bring your appetite and a favorite dish to share. 5:30 p.m. at the Parsons Center. FMI and to RSVP to 207-363-4974 ext. 20 or email Cynthia Young-Gomes.

13th Stories, Stones and Superstitions — Author Talk at York Public Library. New England’s burying grounds are often called outdoor museums – full of history, art and chronicles of religious beliefs, genealogy, sometimes tragedy and scandal – even humor. Author Roxie Zwicker’s presentation will provide an explanation of the symbolism and special language of gravestones and further explore the attitudes and customs about death that these historic artifacts reflect. Focusing on early New England grave markers and their carvers, this illustrated program promises to be informative as well as entertaining and should make you look at area gravestones with new insight and appreciation. Books and artwork will be on sale after the presentation. Program co-sponsored by York Public Library and Museums of Old York. Noon at York Library, 15 Long Sands Road, York. Call 207-363-2818

18th Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. Join this lively bunch on the third Sunday of (almost) every month from 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI: email or call 207-363-4974

25th Andrea Quartet at the Parsons Center. Come listen to beautiful classical music by Haydn, Dvorak and Grainger at the Remick Barn. Learn about the composers and their work from violinists Augusto Salazar and Theresa Carr; violist Katie Backus; and cellist Michael Danielski. 3 Lindsay Road, York; 2 p.m. Ticket Prices: Adult $10, Student $5, Family $25.To purchase tickets stop by the museum office or call 207-363-4974 ext. 14.

31st Tap, Tap, Tap….. A Special Jefferds Tavern Dinner Fundraiser! Celebrate the very end of winter and help us raise funds for the winterization and restoration of Jefferds Tavern. A much beloved historic building, the Tavern continues to be a focal point in York Village and is used year-round for the Museum’s educational programs, Tavern Dinners and the annual Christmas Tea. The building stands as a shining example of how a group of concerned people can protect history while at the same time making a building relevant to the community. Today the tavern needs insulation, new clapboards, and “buttoning up” so that it can be used throughout the winter months with energy efficiency. Once this work is completed, there will be no better or more charming location for bridge parties, sewing groups, poetry readings, book clubs, tavern dinners, and the new educational programs for both children and adults. Watch for your invitation in the mail in early March. At the Parsons Center, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, 6:30 p.m. for wine and hors d’oeuvres, 7:30 p.m. for dinner; $125 per person; RSVP by March 23, 2012; FMI call 207-363-4974 ext. 13 or email Laura Dehler.

Collecting a Hero for the Ages: A Look at Flash Gordon
Long before “Star Trek” and “Star Wars” captivated audiences with their imaginative tales of heroes, villains, alien creatures and travel to other galaxies, science-fiction fans were enthralled by the gallant exploits of the fearless space adventurer, Flash Gordon. Created by artist and cartoonist Alex Raymond, the dashing, blond-haired hero has been traveling to the strange planets, meeting a host of unusual beings and bizarre creatures, and battling the planet Mongo’s evil ruler, Ming the Merciless, for 78 years. As one of the science-fiction genre’s earliest and most popular creations, Flash Gordon was also one of the first…

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Fort Andross Winter Antique Show

Steeple repairs to make history

The 186-year-old structure atop First Parish Church is being refurbished to match the original, even the wood

Community Calendar Feb. 1-12
Portland History Docents classes, Thursdays 9 am-12 pm, Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress St. #2, Portland, registration required, 774-5561 ext. 120. City of Portland Republican Caucus, 9:30 am, Riverton Elementary, 1600 Forest Ave., Portland.

Fort Kent Historical Society, archives unveil massive genealogical collection
Thanks to his efforts and with the support of the Fort Kent Historical Society and the Acadian Archives at the University of Maine at Fort Kent, the massive collection of books, photographs, notes, maps and related genealogical ephemera is now indexed…

Eastport’s 1814 history deserves commemoration
Members of the Eastport Border Historical Society have done a great job in opening the pages of our history to so many people. It is time, however, for the entire community delegation, Maine state government, members of Congress and all of Maine to get…

Maine to Ohio … Farmall collection finds new home

Alden Peabody, of Augusta, Maine, restored the tractors with his father, Harold. … and did not understand the history or the significance of the models…

FORT ANDROSS WINTER ANTIQUE SHOW!

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO THE SECOND ANNUAL FORT ANDROSS WINTER ANTIQUE SHOW!
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 26TH, 2012
FROM 10AM TO 3PM!
LOCATED IN TH HISTORIC FORT ANDROSS BUILDING
AT 14 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, ME 04011
THE SHOW WILL OFFER 54 PLUS DEALERS SELLING AN ASSORTMENT OF ANTIQUES AND ACCESSORIES!
THESE RANGE FROM 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY PRIMITIVES, FURNITURE, FOLK ART, ART, POTTERY, FIRE ARMS, NAUTICAL, JEWELRY, PEWTER, TEXTILES, AND SO MUCH MORE!
EARLY BUYING FROM 8AM TO 10AM, $5 ADMISSION FEE
FREE GENERAL ADMISSION STARTING AT 10AM!
FREE PARKING
FOOD WILL BE PROVIDED BY FORT ANDROSS’ OWN “THE FOOD DUDE” JAC CARY
AND DELECTIABLE DESERTS BY DAVE HANSEN!

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU!
“YOU ARE SURE TO FIND SOMETHING RARE, UNUSUAL, OR ONE OF A KIND!”

THANK YOU!

FOR SHOW INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
DEBORAH J. STUFFLEBEAM
SHOW MANAGER
207-607-4514
207-522-1977
207-607-4513-FAX
CABOT@WATERFRONTME.COM
WWW.CABOTIQUES.COM

February events at Museums of Old York:

For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

February

2nd Maine’s Museums: Art, Oddities & Artifacts. Janet Mendelsohn, author of Maine’s Museums: Art, Oddities & Artifacts (Countryman Press, 2011) will present “On the road to Maine’s Museums,” a talk, slide show and book signing at York Public Library. Explore Maine through its art, history, maritime, children’s and quirky museums. Mendelsohn, a freelance writer for the Boston Globe travel section and other publications, will offer ideas for day trips, mini-vacations and armchair traveling. Books will be available for purchase. The event, part of the York Public Library’s Brown Bag Lunch series, is co-sponsored by Museums of Old York. Free and open to the public. 12–1 p.m at York Public Library, 15 Long Sands Road in York. For information about the author, visit www.janetmendelsohn.com.

3rd George Marshall Store Gallery Opening Reception. Please join us for an opening reception for the gallery’s winter installation. Mary has installed the gallery with a selection of work; some will be familiar and others will be new to you. It is nice to have a reason to come together during these quieter winter days.
RECEPTION Friday, February 3, 2012 5-7 pm at George Marshall Store Gallery, 140 Lindsay Road, York, Maine, 207-351-1083
EXHIBITION DATES Through April 8, 2012
GALLERY HOURS By chance and appointment

8th & 12th “Let’s Talk About York History” at the Parsons Center. First sessions for 1631 Partners as well as our current and former Trustees. Feb. 8 at 5 p.m. and Feb. 12 at 3 p .m. Please email Laura at development@oldyork.org for more information and to RSVP. (General membership sessions will be held on the 26th and 29th of February – see below.)

17th Tavern Dinner. Traditional hearth cooked meal in a cozy, colonial tavern environment. Menu to be announced. 6-8 p.m. at Jefferds Tavern, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Cost: $30 members / $35 non-members. Reservations are required. Please email Eileen early to reserve your space.

19th Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI, email or call 207-363-4974 ext 13.

26th & 29th “Let’s Talk About York History” Discussion Groups Convene for our Members at the Parsons Center. Feb. 26 at 3 p.m. and Feb. 29 at 5 p.m. Please email Laura at development@oldyork.org for more information and to RSVP. (We have invited our 1631 Partners and current and former Trustees to discussion sessions earlier in February – see above.)

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, headlines, historical societies, Maine, Maine things to do, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

East Lamoine Coaling Station

Merry Christmas everyone and I hope you all are enjoying this day of celebration of the birth of our Lord Jesus. It is amazing how far the legend of Santa Claus has come in the relatively short time period of its existence. Here in Maine Christmas has always been held by we Mainer’s in a special way, just as it has been by folks in other states. As we become more and more globalized, I find that the season has become, unfortunately, far too commercialized, and even now the real reason having slipped far away into our distant memories.

Even the more recent Santa Claus fable has become to be erased from our memories, with a shallow attitude of just a simple “happy holidays” replacing the once loved and jovial “Merry Christmas” that we grew up with. It just goes to show how easy it is to have our history replaced with a false story to change the meaning of our past.

This time of year, many of our historical societies have closed the barn door, or are soon about to, for the frigid winter season. Keep them in your thoughts and try to support them, not only financially but by offering your time by helping out with the many tasks required to maintain an organization that in many communities is relegated to just a small position of importance. Joyeux Noël mes amis!

This post card from my collection depicts the Navy’s coaling station built at East Lamoine in down east Maine. This station was a vital link in the Naval operations for the northern Atlantic region as it was the closest coaling station on the route to the European waters. Its construction was begun in the year 1900, and finished in 1902.

The station was only in operation for a short while due to the fact that oil was already replacing coal as the major fuel used by the Navy. During World War I, the station became a nitrate storage facility for nitrates used in the manufacture of explosives. Shortly thereafter the facility was largely dismantled and sold for scrap metal. In the 1930’s the University of Maine acquired some of the buildings for a biological laboratory and then, it was acquired by the state for use as a state park facility during the 1950’s.

The following is an excerpt from the 1900 Report of the Secretary of the Navy to the House of Representatives, 56th Congress, 2nd session, Document #3.

Frenchman’s Bay.—During the past year a site for a naval coal depot has been acquired in the town of East Lamoine, Frenchmans Bay, coast of Maine. The site consists of about 60 acres, and cost, including two frame houses, $24,650. It has a water front of 2,425 feet and is admirably situated in every respect for a coaling station. At the point where the pier will be erected a depth of 30 feet is found within 100 feet of low-water mark. There is ample room off the station for an entire fleet to anchor in a well-protected harbor with good holding ground. The site is being fenced and graded and bids nave been asked for the construction of a steel pier, steel house capable of storing 10,000 tons of coal, and the necessary conveying appliances for rapidly handling the same.

~~~

Lewiston’s Museum L-A gets grant to preserve textile designs

AUGUSTA — Museum L-A will receive a grant of $2,418 to help it preserve and store historical collections, including textile designs. The grant comes from the Historical Records Collections Grant Program administered by the Maine Historical Records Advisory Board. It was announced Fri…

Students study history by acting out Middle Ages battle

Edward Little High School world history students Caleb Gray, left, and Patrick Cowan engage in a mock sword fight during a re-enactment of the medieval Battle of Agincourt, part of the Hundred Years’ War between England and France. The idea and script for the re-enactment in Auburn on Tuesday cam…

Gray Historical Society
Independent Publishing Group
There are many pictures in the book written by George Hill, History, Records and Recollections of Gray, Maine, that show its original appearance. There are others housed at the Historical Society. The Gray Historical Society has been meticulous in its…

Historical society mugs celebrate Farmington
Lewiston Sun Journal
A closeup of the latest mug in a series released by Farmington Historical Society celebrating Farmington’s history. Allan Smith and Karl Holschuh are shown with the latest mug in a series released by Farmington Historical Society celebrating…

Town House gathers support
Kennebec Journal
The historical society has sought advice of three consultants, including Les Fossel of Old House Restoration in Alna, and a representative from the Maine Historic Preservation Commission. She said all three consultants agreed that the building should…

Family Ties: 1881 diary details shopping trip in Eastport
Bangor Daily News
29, Maine Old Cemetery Association meeting, Hiram. New or renewal memberships to MOCA are $5 for one year, $20 five years or $100 life membership, sent to MOCA, PO Box 641, Augusta, ME 04432-0641. For more information on researching family history in…

Scuttlebutt
knox.VillageSoup.com
The untold story of Maine Maritime Academy’s historic schooner Bowdoin will be illuminated in an upcoming exhibit at the Castine Historical Society scheduled for the summer of 2012. The exhibit, titled Schooner Bowdoin on the Greenland Patrol…

Grant to help revamp history hike
Seacoastonline.com
“This program is an all-school walking tour for elementary students that seeks to teach history through local historical sites,” said Nina Mauer, consulting curator of the Old Berwick Historical Society in South Berwick, which is working with the…

February events at the Museums of Old York

2 Author Talk at York Public Library: Maine’s Museums: Art, Oddities & Artifacts. Author Janet Mendelsohn will present “On the road to Maine’s Museums,” a talk, slide show and book signing at the York Public Library, 15 Long Sands Road, York, on Thursday, Feb. 2 from 12–1 p.m. Explore Maine through its art, history, maritime, children’s and quirky museums. Mendelsohn, a freelance writer for the Boston Globe travel section and other publications, will offer ideas for day trips, mini-vacations and armchair traveling. Books will be available for purchase. The event is co-sponsored by Museums of Old York. Free and open to the public. For information about the author, visit www.janetmendelsohn.com

17 Tavern Dinner. Traditional hearth cooked meal in a cozy, colonial tavern environment. Menu to be announced. 6-8 p.m. at Jefferds Tavern, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Cost: $30 members / $35 non-members. Reservations are required. Please email early to reserve your space.

19 Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. Join this lively bunch on the third Sunday of (almost) every month from 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI, email or call 207-363-4974 ext 13.

21, 22, 23 Vacation Camp: Indian Raids and Pioneer Trades. Become a 16th century York settler! See what a settler’s house looked like, try on their clothes and experience 17th century food by cooking some historic recipes over the fire. Embark on a snow shoe trek through the snow to “Canada” deciding your fate along the way, just like captured settlers in 1692. Dip candles and make tin lanterns to take home. 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. at The Parsons Center, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Preregistration Required. $65 ($60 members) Ages 6-12.

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U-Maine’s folklore collection to get new home at Library of Congress

Welcome to another round of Maine history headlines and news from around the web! A special thanks to those who have sent in links to share. Just a comment on that, by the way. Please make sure you have a valid description of your email in the subject line. If there is no relevant wording in the subject line it will go into spam, and as the amount of spam mail is increasing again, I will no longer look at emails in my spam box. Send in your news, links and event notifications to editor@touringmaineshistory.com if you have something to share.

As a note for future interest, I am interested in receiving guest posts from historical society fans covering meeting and events around the state of Maine. It will be a good way to share news of what you are doing with a greater audience than you might get otherwise.

If I do not get time to do another post before Thanksgiving, have a happy holiday, and enjoy the day!

Joe Steinberger: Rockland History, in Context
Freepress Online
by Joe Steinberger This Saturday at 12:30 pm at the Rockland Public Library, there will be a presentation by members of the Rockland Historical Society about the Lime Rock Railroad that once linked Rockland’s limestone quarries to the shore side kilns…

All aboard for history of Rockland’s industrial railroad
knox.VillageSoup.com
The Rockland Historical Society and the Rockland Public Library will present a multi-media program about Rockland’s Lime Rock Railroad on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 1:30 pm The program at the library will be preceded by the historical society’s annual…

Official issued proclamation against Penobscot Indians in 1755
Bangor Daily News
The page refers to “Documentary History of Maine,” Baxter Manuscripts, Vol. 24 Page 63, and also the Androscoggin Historical Society at http://www.rootsweb.com/~meandrhs. So in addition to taking land and spreading disease and paying Native Americans…

Belfast women sewed a patriotic legacy in 1864
Bangor Daily News
Discovering the phrase “Belfast, Maine, June 17, 1864” printed on a white stripe, the woman contacted the Belfast Historical Society. According to Pinette, after the Armory Square Hospital closed in 1865, the Belfast quilt “was most likely given to Dr…

Town histories a great source for veterans lists
Bangor Daily News
They are among the Abbot World War I veterans listed in “A Centeseptquinary History of Abbot, Maine 1827-2002,” a book that continues to be available through the Abbot Historical Society. Gerrish, Morse and Orff served in places such as St. Mihiel and…

UMaine ‘national treasure’ of folklore to get new home at Library of Congress

ORONO, Maine — Legend has it that the Maine Folklife Center hatched from a shoebox under the desk of University of Maine professor Edward “Sandy” Ives. Half a century ago, that box held just a few audio recordings of Mainers describing their way of life and way of making a…

Museums of Old York schedule of events;

November

19 Visual Language and Constructed Views: New Exhibits at George Marshall Store Gallery. Opening reception on Saturday Nov. 19, 5-7 p.m. This exhibition runs through December 18. Gallery Hours are Wed. – Sat. 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Sunday 1-4 p.m. and by appointment.

21 The Art of Wreathmaking
Join MOY staff as we prepare wreaths to decorate our historic properties for the holiday season.
Meet at 2 p.m. at Remick Barn in The Parsons Center, 3 Lindsay Road in York Village.

30 Gingerbread House Competition. Help the Museums of Old York decorate a gingerbread rendition of the John Hancock Warehouse. Use frosting and candy to add windows, shingles, a ramp and the ocean so the house can be entered in York Library’s gingerbread house contest! After helping with our gingerbread house, decorate your very own house in true Victorian holiday style to take home. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Registration required, ages 5 and up, $25 ($20 members).

December
3 A Christmas Tea at Jefferds Tavern. The Museums of Old York will once again host a favorite local holiday tradition at the historic Jefferds Tavern from noon until 4 p.m. on Saturday, December 3 as a part of the annual Festival of Lights celebration in York Village. This yuletide happening, managed again this year by volunteer Michele LaBranche, brings traditional Victorian-style holiday cheer to the entire family. Candlelight, a cozy fire, shining silverware, delicate teacups and Christmas greens set the stage at Jefferds Tavern. But the desserts are really the highlight created by local bakers and talented volunteers.

This year’s menu of tasty treats includes Apple Crisp, Harvest Pumpkin Pie, Cheesecake, Chocolate Cake, Raspberry Almond Pie, Lemon Pie, Fluffy Peanut Butter Pie, and Indian Pudding. Enjoy the ambiance, company of friends and delicious desserts as you warm yourself by the fire. The last sitting will be at 3:30 p.m. Admission is $6 and includes a choice of two desserts and tea. There is no charge for children under age 5. FMI, please email or call 207-363-4974.

14 Candle Dipping and Holiday Decor. Without electricity how did people light their homes at night? With candles of course! Dip your own candles for when the power goes out this winter or as a centerpiece for a holiday dinner. Create colorful curled candles, string cranberries and make a decoration for your window or Christmas tree. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Registration required, ages 8 and up, $10 ($8 members).

Categories: breaking news, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, stories, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ellsworth Historical Society Going to Jail

Ellsworth Historical Society reports that their November meeting will be held at the Old Jail. (sorry, couldn’t resist the leading titleJ) There are lots of other functions going on around Maine as well, so keep an eye on your local societies calendar of events. This time of year, many of the smaller societies are having their final meets of the year, so it is extra important that you help them out with closing up shop for the winter season. Also, we’re getting into the Christmas season and volunteering opportunities to help out with seasonal events are coming up. If you have a function going on and would like to spread the word, feel free to share here by emailing the details to editor@touringmaineshistory.com.

The Museums of Old York also has a full roster of events for November. The annual Tavern dinner is apparently sold out, but check out the other events they’ve got scheduled at www.oldyork.org.

History headlines seem to be slowing down in frequency, so look for more excerpts and stories about Maine history to fill in the off days here on Touring Maine’s History.

Ellsworth Historical Society to meet at Old Jail…

The November 14th meeting of the Ellsworth Historical Society will be held at 40 State Street at the home of the Society, “The Old Hancock County Jail”. The regular business meeting will start at 7:00 pm and after the meeting members will be decorating the Victorian Home for the annual holiday open house scheduled for December 3, 2011 from 10:00 to 3:00. Members are asked to bring any Victorian Christmas ideas, traditions, and decorations they may like to share.

Membership is welcome to all and volunteers are always needed. For more information please contact Terri Cormier at 667-8235 or Linda Grindle at 667-5716. You may also email us at ellsworthhistory@yahoo.comand visit our website at http://ellsworthme.org/ellshistory/

A humble view of history
The Freeport Historical Society says its project helps visitors relate to life before indoor plumbing. By Kelley Bouchard kbouchard@mainetoday.com FREEPORT – There was a time when every backyard in Maine had a privy. A nine-member AmeriCorps team…

Local group files request to save Wood Island Life Saving Station
KITTERY, Maine — One group submitted a proposal Thursday to restore the Wood Island Life Saving Station, and maintain the building and grounds of the island. The Wood Island Life Saving Station Association and Old York Historical…

Maine libraries, museums look to embrace technology
… of those organizations that are working toward historical preservation, sharing information, sharing expertise,” said Maine Archives and Museums Vice President George Squibb, who is also the archivist at the Belfast Historical Society and Museum…

Courthouse plan to be scaled back

AUBURN — A plan for modernizing Androscoggin County’s Civil War-era courthouse is getting a rewrite. The reason is a price tag of $34 million and climbing. A 123-page report to the County Commission detailed the aging building’s many flaws and possible changes including: the…

Museum offers second chance to see plane project

LEWISTON — Museum L-A is offering a second chance to see the Lockheed “Super Star” reconstruction project at the Auburn-Lewiston Airport with behind-the-scenes tours on Saturday, Nov. 12.

Thursday, November 10, 7pm

In Partnership with the National Society of the Colonial Dames in Maine

Tales from an Art Detective: Tracing Nazi-era Provenance

Presenter: Victoria Reed, Curator for Provenance, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

November Happening at Museums of Old York

4 Shaker Furniture.*Co-sponsored with York Public Library* Gene Cosloy is recognized as one of the leading interpreters of the Shaker philosophy as it pertains to the design and craftsmanship of their furniture. Never considering their work to be art but merely utilitarian and functional, the Shaker craftsmen nevertheless achieved worldwide fame and influence. Gene will explore the meaning and reasons behind this achievement by examining the history of the Shaker experience in America over a period of two centuries. 7 p.m. at York Public Library, 15 Long Sands Road, York. Call 207-363-2818 more information.

11 Tavern Dinner. *This dinner is SOLD OUT!*Another in our popular series of scrumptious meals in a historic setting! Menu highlights include apple squash soup,pork roast and chocolate torte, among other timeless treats.Jefferds Tavern, 7 p.m. Email Richard Bowen for more information and to be placed on our waiting list for cancellations.

12 Author Talk: Elizabeth Collins Cromley. *Co-sponsored with York Public Library* Elizabeth Collins Cromley will speak about her book, “Food Axis: Cooking, Eating and the Architecture of American Houses”. She examines the way the architecture of America houses has evolved as food preparation changed from the colonial period through modern times. 11 a.m. at York Public Library, 15 Long Sands Road, York. Call 207-363-2818 for more information.

17 Super Soap. Get your hands dirty while making soap. Learn how people made soap before you could buy it in the store and then make some of your own. Choose your ingredients, poor them into a decorative mold of your choice and take home totally useable and beautiful bars of soap for your kitchen and bathroom. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center.Registration required, ages 5 and up, $10 ($8 members).

21 The Art of Wreathmaking. Join MOY staff as we prepare wreaths to decorate our historic properties for the holiday season. Afternoon at The Parsons Center. More information to come.

30 Gingerbread House Competition. Help the Museums of Old York decorate a gingerbread rendition of the John Hancock Warehouse. Use frosting and candy to add windows, shingles, a ramp and the ocean so the house can be entered in York Library’s gingerbread house contest! After helping with our gingerbread house, decorate your very own house in true Victorian holiday style to take home. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Registration required, ages 5 and up, $25 ($20 members).

Other Museum News

Museums of Old York’s historic musuem buildings and exhibits are closed for the season, however, we are happy to arrange tours by appointment. Please contact our education and curatorial staff by email or call us at 207-363-4974 ext. 12 for more information.

Our Library and Archives are located in the Museums’ Administration Building at 207 York Street. The Library is open Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday by appointment. Please contact our library staff by email or call us at 207-363-4974 ext. 19 for more information.

Categories: articles, breaking news, events, headlines, historical societies, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hearth Cooking at the Remick Barn

Family events on tap at Belfast Cohousing and Ecovillage
Bangor Daily News
MACHIAS, Maine — The annual meeting of the Machias Historical Society will be held during a Dutch treat supper at 6 pm Friday, Aug. 12, at Helen’s Restaurant in Machias. A ceremony commemorating the 1777 Battle of Machias will be held at 5:30 pm at…

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Community Website: Islesboro

Tomorrow’s book talk at MHS, described below, explores the love story between a young couple from Islesboro during the Civil War. This community website–developed by local partners from the Islesboro Historical Society, Islesboro Central School, and Alice L. Pendleton Library working with MHS staff–surveys the broader history of this special island in Penobscot Bay. Visit the site.

~~~

Museums of Old York Programs and Events
For a complete and up-to-date calendar of Museums of Old York programs see our website.

August

9, 16 Community Supper Benefit for Old York at Robert’s Maine Grill. Every Tuesday night Robert’s Maine Grill in Kittery offers a “Community Supper” and donates a portion of the proceeds to a local non-profit — in this case, Museums of Old York! The main focus of the supper is a $12, 3 course menu in the spirit of Robert’s style: Maine Comfort Food with an updated twist. The menu is posted by Friday at www.robertsmainegrill.com. For more information email or phone 207-439-0300

11 “History Challenge!” Game Show. Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email Richard Bowen to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

12, 19, 26 Hearth Cooking Demonstrations. Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th-century recipes and techniques over the open fire. Stop in Fridays around 3:00 p.m. to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museum buildings.

14 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email Richard Bowen for details and reservations.

15 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium. This year’s Fellows Symposium will feature presentations on their Tavern and the Library projects, tours of the new Tavern exhibit, and a reception. We encourage all our members and friends to attend and see the results of their work this summer! Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 5 p.m. Free.

21 Museums of Old York Annual Meeting. Calling all members! Please join us this year to weigh in on a new vision for your organization! There will be a recap of highlights of the past year and a financial report. Enjoy refreshments with staff, trustees, and other members. 4 p.m., Remick Barn, York.

25 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

September

9 Preview Party: Fouth Annual Old York Antiques Show. The Old York Antiques Show will begin with a preview party on Friday, September 9th from 5 – 8 p.m. Guests will have an exclusive preview of dealer booths and the first opportunity to purchase antiques while enjoying hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and live music. Tickets for the preview party are $75 and include admission to the Antiques Show on Saturday and Sunday. Patrons who donate $125 will receive one ticket to the Preview Party, be recognized at the event and are invited to a special reception to honor our dealers. Spending Spree Raffle Tickets will be on sale. 100% of the proceeds support the museum’s education programs, which serve over 20,000 children and families each year. Tickets can be purchased in advance by calling the Museums of Old York at (207) 363-4974

10-11 Fourth Annual Old York Antiques Show. The fourth annual antiques show at the Museums of Old York will take place September 10-11. This year’s boutique show, which is generously sponsored by a number of area businesses, will feature approximately twenty dealers highlighting exceptional silver and brass, furniture, paintings, ceramics, jewelry, oriental rugs, nautical items, textiles, folk art and decorative art. 100% of the proceeds from the show support the museum’s education programs. The Antiques Show will take place at the museum’s main campus, located at 3 Lindsay Road in York Village and runs Saturday, September 10 and Sunday, September 11 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The $10 admission includes a two-day ticket to experience the Museums of Old York. Free parking is available on-site.

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of areas outside the village proper. Email Richard Bowen for more information.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany their hearth-cooked meal.Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Reservations required. Email Richard Bowen.

29 History Brought to Life. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

~~~

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.


Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.


Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, events, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston Christopher Glass, author of “Historic Maine Homes: 300 Years of Great Houses,” will be the featured speaker at the Thomaston Historical Society’s program Tuesday, Aug. 9 at the Knox Farmhouse, 80 Knox St. The evening will begin with…

Blueberry pancake breakfast to be held in Ellsworth The Blue Hill Historical Society will host a tour of historic Gettysburg Oct. 17-21 with departure locations in Bangor and Portland. The deposit deadline is Aug. 15 and the final payment deadline is Sept. 12…

Discovery of 2 books reveals Strong history The society recently received a grant from the Maine Historical Society’s Maine Memory Network (www.mainememory.net) that will allow the Strong team to purchase a high-quality scanner, computer and archiving materials. The Maine Memory Network was…

Strong groups awarded grant for history project The Strong Historical Society, the Strong Public Library, the High Peaks Alliance, and Strong School have partnered to begin a local history project, funded by a grant recently awarded by the Maine Memory Network…

History symposium scheduled for Aug. 4 in Machias Earl Shettleworth, of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, will be the keynote speaker at the History Symposium being sponsored by the Machias Historical Society. The theme of the symposium will be “Historic Preservation is Alice and Well in…

Author to sign mystery novel at Blueberry Festival Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will sign copies of her book, “The Wilding House,” on Friday and Saturday at the Wilton Historical Society during the Blueberry Festival. Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will…

Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture Everybody knows what wicker is, right? It’s that woven stuff that’s painted white. It may even be that stuff used in some chair seats. Or is that cane? Or rush, or reed? It turns out, Worthologist Fred Taylor explains, the word wicker in furniture terms actually refers to a process rather than a product. Follow along as Fred weaves the story of the evolution of wicker furniture, from ancient Egypt to the late Victorian period of the 1880s and 1890s to today. Read”Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture”

~~~

Maine Historical Society

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit:

Practical Nursing in Waterville

This exhibit was created by staff at Kennebec Vally Community College, one of Maine Memory Network’s 210+ Contributing Partners.

Thousands of nurses were trained at the Maine School of Practical Nursing in Waterville from the 1950s through the 1980s. Read the story.

MHS News

September 1 Deadline for

Maine Memory Network Grants

Does your community have a story to share? Or a historical collection it would like to provide better access to? MHS is accepting proposals to help YOUR community share its history through Maine Memory Network:

  • Digitization grants (up to $750) are provided to help organizations and local teams use Maine Memory to digitize, catalog, and manage their collections online.
  • Online exhibit grants (up to $1250) are provided to help organizations and local teams share historical stories online. Topics might reflect any aspect of your town’s past, and range from the history of local businesses and industries to the community’s experience during a national event (e.g. the Civil War).

Encourage your favorite local organization to apply! Grants are accompanied by extensive training and support designed to help communities complete their projects and develop a broad range of skills. Detailed information.

From the Collections

MHS Online Catalog and Maine Memory Network recently updated!

If you are looking for a historical object from our collection, or want to browse through Maine artifacts, you can visit our online catalog PastPerfect. We recently added nearly 500 records and over 1,200 images to the catalog, which now contains almost 32,000 searchable records and 23,500 images for museum objects, photographs, manuscript letters, architectural drawings, and newspapers.

Newly added highlights: CMP collection objects, additional images from the Portland Press Herald glass plate negative collection, panoramic photographs, and additional Fogg collection autograph letters, including examples from artist Paul Akers and naturalist Louis Agassiz.

Additions to Maine Memory Network happen every day and we are now featuring 20,155 records! Contributors such as the L.C. Bates Museum and the Dyer Library Archives/ Saco Museum have been busy this summer adding new photos.

You can see what’s new to MMN and even subscribe to an RSS feed for new images and exhibits!

~~~

Museums of Old York

Programs for adults

Thursday, August 4
Author Talk with David Remington at Remick Barn.
We are very pleased to offer an evening with David Remington, who will speak on his recently published book, Ashbel P. Fitch, Champion of Old New York. This biography of his great-grandfather provides a rare glimpse into the gilded age of New York City’s political world. Free for Members of Old York. $5 for nonmembers. Remick Barn, 7 p.m. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Saturday, August 6
Indian Encampment.
Well-known re-enactor, Ken Hamilton, presents a 17th-18th-century Indian Encampment during the day in front of the Remick Barn and Jefferds Tavern. This is a not-to-be-missed event with exciting activities for all age groups. Donations are appreciated. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Thursday, August 11
“History Challenge!” Game Show.
Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answer questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email rbowen@oldyork.org to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

Through Saturday August 13
Emerson House — 2011 Decorator Show House.
Our fundraiser continues with tours on Mon-Wed-Fri-Sat from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., and Sunday afternoons from 1-4 p.m. The house is closed to visitors on Tuesdays. Tickets are $20 at the door. We also have just a few tickets remaining for our final luncheon and designer discussion on August 10 at The York Harbor Reading Room. Tickets are $55 and include lunch, lecture and a full show house tour. To purchase tickets, please call (207) 363-4974. Visit our website for updates on the show house and other special events.

Sunday, August 14
Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed.
Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

Monday, August 15
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening. The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and Grand Opening of the Exhibit — Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer; Report on Library and Archives Project — Jessica Frankenfield, Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine, 5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m. Reception immediately following. Email development@oldyork.org for more information.

Fun for kids and families

Friday, August 5
Hearth Cooking Demonstration.
Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th -century receipts and techniques over the open fire. Watch and help as they prepare everything from fish and chicken to bread, pies and pudding using traditional methods such as Dutch ovens, iron kettles, and the bake oven. Stop in around 3:00 p.m. every Friday in July and August in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museums buildings. Email education@oldyork.org for more information.

Through Thursday, August 25
Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs.
Our summer camp programs for children build on the core curriculum of our school programs and provide children with learning experiences in a fun and supportive environment. Download a brochure and sign-up form for Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs for Children. Reservations are required for all programs. Programs run 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. and cost $23 ($20 members) unless otherwise indicated. For more information email education@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974.

~~~

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. I have made a few concessions to changes of the cover and some images, but the stories are all there. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Museums of Old York, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Willowbrook Village Needs Your Help!

Willowbrook Village, a historic Maine gem, may be lost
Its endowment depleted, the museum of 19th century life in Newfield will close if it doesn’t get help.

19th Century Willowbook Village 501(c)(3) from Ameilia Chamberlain on Vimeo.

Civil War re-enactment coming to Otisfield The 1839 meetinghouse on Bell Hill Road will be transformed Sunday into a Civil War encampment for the first time in many years to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Members of Maine’s Company A, 3rd Maine Regiment Volunteer Infantry, will be camped out…

Volunteers unearth clues to town’s past Artifacts uncovered in a Freeport archaeological dig help tell the story of one of the community’s earliest residents…

The Value and Importance Of Maintaining Civil War Sites

Posted: 25 Jul 2011 08:54 AM PDT

It is an honor to stand with you on one of our most sacred American landscapes. Here, 150 years ago today, the nation got its first real look at civil war. This is where American democracy began its baptism by fire. Where the grueling four-year journey that shaped a nation, began in earnest. The battle of Manassas dispelled the myth that the war would be a quick affair…Over 620,000 lives. That was the price exacted by the Civil War. But those were only the military deaths. The war’s impact extended much farther than the battlefield….

Culture celebrated at Micmac farmers market It was a day of cultural and natural celebration at the Micmac farmers market Saturday aimed at encouraging natives and non-natives alike to get back to their roots. The Aroostook Band of Micmacs invited the public to their farmers market on Route 1 near the Caribou…

Last supper at Jacques Cartier Club
Just before 5 p.m. Saturday, a long table at the Jacques Cartier Club was brimming with baked beans of several varieties, hot dogs, bread, coleslaw and casseroles galore. More than 100 waited to eat, for $6 apiece, a meal that included dessert and beverage. For the last time…

Responding to ‘But, It’s ____’ Queries When conducting an appraisal, Worthologist Harry Rinker says he’s more likely to disappoint than please when providing values, as nearly everyone thinks what he/she owns is worth more than its value on the secondary market. When providing an appraisal value, he looks people straight in the eyes. Their facial expression, especially the eyes, is an excellent indicator of their unhappiness if they feel the value is too low. And then follows the question asking how can it be worth so little? “But, it’s (fill in the blank).” Click through to see how Harry answers this stock query. Read “Responding to ‘But, It’s ____’ Queries”

~~~

From the Museums of Old York:

Programs for adults

Thursday, August 4
Author Talk with David Remington at Remick Barn. We are very pleased to offer an evening with David Remington, who will speak on his recently published book, Ashbel P. Fitch, Champion of Old New York. This biography of his great-grandfather provides a rare glimpse into the gilded age of New York City’s political world. Free for Members of Old York. $5 for nonmembers. Remick Barn, 7 p.m. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Saturday, August 6
Indian Encampment. Well-known re-enactor, Ken Hamilton, presents a 17th-18th-century Indian Encampment during the day in front of the Remick Barn and Jefferds Tavern. This is a not-to-be-missed event with exciting activities for all age groups. Donations are appreciated. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Thursday, August 11
“History Challenge!” Game Show. Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answer questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email rbowen@oldyork.org to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

Through Saturday August 13
Emerson House — 2011 Decorator Show House. Our fundraiser continues with tours on Mon-Wed-Fri-Sat from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., and Sunday afternoons from 1-4 p.m. The house is closed to visitors on Tuesdays. Tickets are $20 at the door. We also have just a few tickets remaining for our final luncheon and designer discussion on August 10 at The York Harbor Reading Room. Tickets are $55 and include lunch, lecture and a full show house tour. To purchase tickets, please call (207) 363-4974. Visit our website for updates on the show house and other special events.

Sunday, August 14
Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

Monday, August 15
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening. The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and Grand Opening of the Exhibit — Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer; Report on Library and Archives Project — Jessica Frankenfield, Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine, 5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m. Reception immediately following. Email development@oldyork.org for more information.

Save the Date: August 15, 2011
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening

The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and
Grand Opening of the Exhibit

Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer

Report on Library and Archives Project
Jessica Frankenfield

Remick Barn
3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine

Monday, August 15, 2011
5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m.

Reception Immediately Following

RSVP by email or phone: (207)363-4974

Save the Date: August 21, 2011
Annual Meeting to Feature Discussion of Dramatic Changes for Old York
Calling all members! Please join us this year to weigh in on a new vision for your organization! Old York’s board and staff are working on a strategic plan to address the significant changes affecting Old York and historical museums nationwide. Join a lively discussion of where we may go from here to thrive as a vital part of our community.

There will be a recap of highlights of the past year and a financial report. Enjoy refreshments with staff, trustees, and other members.

Museums of Old York Annual Meeting
Sunday, August 21, 2011, 4 p.m., Remick Barn, York
Phone (207) 363-4974 for more information

~~~

From the Maine Historical Society:

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Historic Photograph: Model Train Races, Houlton, ca. 1960

Click the photograph above, contributed to Maine Memory Network

by the Oakfield Historical Society, to learn about the race!

This Week

Tuesday, July 26, 12pm

Screening: Rapid River Races, 1940

Presenter: Zip Kellogg, Author and Paddler

Join us for a special screening and talk. This 17 minute silent color film is a window into canoe and kayak racing equipment and techniques from another era. It documents the 1940 National Whitewater Canoe & Kayak Championships which were held on the Rapid River in western Maine. The film was lost since it was made 70 years ago; Maine paddler Zip Kellogg had been on the lookout for it for 30 years. Only by utter chance and a twist of fate did it turn up! Zip will share this wonderful story of historical serendipity.

National Whitewater Canoe, Royal River, 1940

Next Week

Tuesday, August 2, 12:00pm

Book Talk: Portland’s Greatest Conflagration: The 1866 Fire Disaster

Speakers: Michael Daicy and Don Whitney, Authors

Friday, August 5, 5-8pm

Dressing Up: First Friday Art Walk

Will you come dressed up to “fit in” or “stand out”?

Categories: antiques, archeology, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, Education, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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