Posts Tagged With: history

Frank Knight, Yarmouth Tree Hugger Passes


Frank Knight, man who cared for famed elm tree, dies at 103
PORTLAND — Frank Knight’s decades-long battle to save New England’s tallest elm served as an inspiring tale of devotion, so it is fitting that he will be laid to rest in a coffin made from the tree he made famous. Knight, who died Monday at 103, had affectionately referred to the 217…

Yarmouth man to be buried in casket made from tree he revered

Frank Knight, who cared for New England’s oldest known American elm for 52 years, dies at 103…

Restoring life to aging clocks a rare profession

AUBURN — There’s something about a grandfather clock’s low “tock … tock” that speaks to Patrick Rohman. “It’s kind of like a heartbeat,” the 57-year-old clock repairman said. Clear out the dead spiders. Clean the gears and springs. Restore the oil. Life returns…

Brunswick discontinues war hero’s imaginary street

BRUNSWICK — In an intriguing example of the sometimes-tenuous relationship between people and reality, the Town Council on Monday unanimously voted to do away with a 105-year-old street that existed only in the imagination of a long-dead war hero…

Ancient tradition of harvesting alewives still going strong in Woolwich

WOOLWICH, Maine — Steve Dodge, who has been helping with springtime alewife harvests in Woolwich for 54 years, held up a stick with 10 smoked fish Sunday and told a reporter to “write us up big.” “Tell ’em they’re smoked golden brown and incredibly delicious,” said Dodge. “Even if they’re…


More Events, Exhibits and Presentations

Maine Agriculture: Views from the Past: Historic photo exhibit. Donation requested. At Page Farm and Home Museum, University of Maine-Orono. Through Nov. 10.

Knox Country Through Eastern’s Eye: Exhibit of historic photos from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection. At Thomaston Public Library. Through June 29.

The Coastal Photography of Elmer Montgomery: Exhibit of works by the renowned Midcoast Maine photographer. At the Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge Visitors Center, 9 Water St., Rockland. Through June 30.

Greetings from Vassalboro: PMM photo archivist Kevin Johnson will show and discuss old photos of Vassalboro and surrounding towns. At Vassalboro Hist. Soc., 360 Main St., East Vassalboro. Free. May 17, 7 p.m.

Greetings from Brooks: PMM photo archivist Kevin Johnson will show and discuss old photos of Brooks and surrounding towns. At Harvest Home Grange Hall, Moosehead Trail H’wy (Rte.7), Brooks. Donation requested. More information: 207-722-3633. May 18, 6:30 p.m.

Greetings from St. George: PMM photo archivist Kevin Johnson will show and discuss old photos of St. George, Port Clyde, Tenants Harbor, Martinsville and Long Cove. At St. George Grange Hall, Wiley’s Corner Rd., St. George. Free; donation accepted. More information: 207-372-8893. May 31: potluck at 6:30; slide show at 7:30 p.m.

Greetings from Nobleboro: PMM photo archivist Kevin Johnson will show old photos of Nobleboro and surrounding towns. At Nobleboro Hist. Soc., 198 Center St. (Old Rte.1). Free. June 15, 7 p.m.


May Programs

18 Tavern Dinner. Join us for this month’s ever popular historic dinner. Relax and kindle new friendships as colonial ladies prepare a fabulous meal at the hearth. This month’s menu will include: Cream of Wild Mushroom Soup, Spring Greens with Goat Cheese and Nuts, Chicken with Dried Plums and Olives, Wild Rice Pilaf, Steamed Green Beans, and Rhubarb Upside Down Cake. Sign up soon –these dinners fill fast! $35 ($30 members) at the Parsons Education Center, 6 p.m.

20 Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center. $4 donation appreciated.

28 Buck-a-Building Memorial Day and Paddle-to-the-Sea. Come see the Museum properties, including the the Old Gaol, Emerson-Wilcox House, Elizabeth Perkins House, Jefferds Tavern, the School House, and our Exhibit, “The country heer is plentiful” Trade, Religion and Warfare in York and Southern Maine, open for $1 tours. At 2 p.m. families are invited participate in Paddle-to-the-Sea, a kid-focused program based on Holling Clancy Hollings children’s book by the same name. After hearing the story, build a little boat, label it with your family’s name and launch it down the river. Follow your boat’s journey to the ocean on our blog. $5 per mini boat at the John Hancock Warehouse. 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

June Programs

2 Museum Opening Day! Come to the Museums of Old York for our opening day, enjoy the historic tours and beautiful ambience of our buildings and grounds. Also stop by the George Marshall Store for the opening of a new exhibit: Michael Stasiuk.
18 Great Bay Sailors Performance at the Wharf Join us for a Seafaring concert complete with shanty tunes at the Hancock Wharf featuring the musical stylings of Portsmouth’s own Great Bay Sailors. The concert starts at 4p.m. a $5 donation is appreciated. Please bring your own chairs or blankets, rain site is inside the warehouse. For more information, pleae contact Zoe or call her at 207-363-4974 x12

News and Updates

For the First Time EVER! The Museums of Old York will hold our Decorator’s Show House and our Antiques show at the SAME time Come to our 23rd Annual Decorator’s Show House and our 5th Annual Antiques Show this summer. The Decorator’s Show House will take place at 19 Harmon Park Road from July 14th through August 11th. The Antiques Show will take place in our Parson’s Center on July 21st and 22nd. During that time, if you purchase a ticket to the Decorator’s Show House, you get free admission to the Antiques Show. Plus, a ticket to either show will entitle you to $5 off admission to all of the Museums of Old York during the 2012 season. For more information, please visit our website or if you would like to volunteer please contact us at 207-363-4974.

Celebration of the Working and Playing Waterfront. A team of staff and trustees are looking ahead to summer and have been working to create an array of programs for 2012 all under the theme York’s rivers and ocean dominate its history. Celebrating our heritage on the water will take many forms. A series of fun and educational programs will be offered throughout June-July-August-September including a river regatta and barbeque, workshops, lectures and demonstrations on the history of lobstering, fishing, boat building, waterfront stories, riverscape painting, the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, and more! A brochure will be coming out soon detailing all the offerings over the summer. See our website for a preliminary schedule of events — stay tuned for updated information.

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Categories: articles, events, headlines, historical societies, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Territory of Perkins Maine

The Kennebec River at Swan Island ca 1900

1890 topographic map of Swan Island

Maine is unique in that we have more unorganized territories than most of the other states in the union, with the exception of Alaska. Most of these unorganized territories are uninhabited, and lie to the northern and western regions of the state. One territory in particular lies in the more heavily inhabited portions of Maine, that being what is known as Perkins Township, located on Swan’s Island in the Kennebec River.

Perkins was initially settled in the mid 1700’s and became an incorporated township in 1847 when Thomas Handasyd Perkins, a summer resident paid for the costs of incorporating as a community in the state of Maine. During the 1800’s, Perkins was a small but thriving community with a brisk trade in shipbuilding and ice harvesting. As the 19th century came to a close, industry and interest drew people away from the town and by 1918, Perkins had become an un-incorporated township. After the ravages of the depression and WWII, not to mention the increasing levels of pollution in the Kennebec, Perkins was left with few residents and the last family left by the mid 1940’s.

At the turn of the century (1900), the US census listed just 61 full time residents, and by 1920, the population had dwindled to just 20 full timers.

The1890 topographic map here shows that there was quite a bit of activity, so what happened to all of the residents? One may surmise that people tend to go where the money is, and with the world changing as rapidly as it was during the last few years of the 19th century, there just was not any money to be made on Swans Island.

Dresden and Gardiner, during the ice harvesting heyday contained some of the largest ice companies in the northeast. Much of the ice was harvested on both sides of the island, with houses lining the banks in both Dresden and Richmond. Very few were built on the island itself, but many of the residents were occupied in the labor end of the ice trade.

Shipbuilding was a larger part of the island commerce, and could be conducted year round to some extent. One of the main components missing from the community was a bridge linking the island to the mainland. A bridge is a connection to the rest of society, and a community can feel left out of the rest of society if that link does not exist.

When the area was first visited by the Europeans, mainly the English, the island was occupied by the Canibis Indians, of whom the great Chief Kennebis (Sebenoa?), who was said to have resided on the island opposite of where the town of Richmond now lies [1]. There were an estimated 1500 braves living on the island at the time [2].

Varney writes[3]:

Perkins in Sagadahoc County, lies in the Kennebec River between Richmond on the west bank and Dresden in Lincoln County, on the east. Its length is about 3 miles and 4 miles in width. It bore the name of Swan Island almost from the time when it was first known until its separation from Dresden and incorporation under its present name in 1847. It lies 14 miles north of Bath, on the line of the Kennebec, Portland and Boston steamers. The nearest railroad station is at East Bowdoinham for the southern part and Richmond village for the northern. The town is mostly level, and is well wooded and fertile. When first discovered by Europeans, the island was the residence of Sebenoa, the sachem of the lower Kennebec. Col. Church and his men in 1692 had a conflict wjth a large body of savages at this place, in which the Indians were routed, some escaping to the mainland, and some to their fort at Teconnet, near Waterville.

The post-office for the town is Richmond. Perkins has one public schoolhouse, valued at $600. The valuation of estates in 1870 was $36,792. In 1880 it was $37,594. The population in 1870 was 71. In 1880 it was 78.

Having been obviously settled to a great extent by the whites prior to the 1800s, the island was at the time a sort of river-way trading settlement, with agriculture being the main industry. There must have been a great deal of traffic in fact, as we find a historical reference as to a Dr. McKechnie having treated a patient for small pox in 1764, blood letting other patients and supplying large quantities of drugs to the residents of the island [4].

The presence of a regular physician indicates a community at least large enough to provide an income for the doctor in residence.

It is unfortunate that such a treasure trove of history has been left to return to the wilds without extracting and retaining as much of our heritage as we can. The 1922 State Assessors Report claims that Swan’s and the smaller Alexander Island (Little Swan) that had made up the township of Perkins consisted of 1344 acres of Wildlands valued at a combined total for estates and Wildlands at 16,119,608. Much of the estate land consisted of cottages and farms, with the American Ice Company and the Crosby Navigation companies being the largest commercial owners of land on the island.

The Demaresq house, Swan Island ca 1900

The Barker House, at the foot of Swan Island ca 1900

  1. Varney, George Jones, Gazetteer of the State of Maine, page 295, pub 1881
  2. Ibid
  3. Ibid, page 440
  4. Kelly, Howard A., Burrage, Walter L., American Medical Biographies, Page 745, pub 1920
  5. Images ca 1900 from the New England Magazine, Ancient Pownalboro and Her Daughters, Charles E. Allen, pub 1901

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Categories: historic buildings, historic preservation, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The First Mass Said in Maine

400 years ago this month, the first Mass was said in Maine on an island in the Kennebec River, some three leagues from its mouth in Popham. There is a lot of discussion, along with reams and reams of documentation considering many of the aspects of Maine’s history, including religion. I found it interesting that the first Catholic Mass was celebrated by the French on the Kennebec, as opposed to some place further north, where their territory was held. The Popham Colony by then had gone by then and there was no opposition to the French presence on the river, so they had been left in peace. This excerpt is from The Makers of Maine, by Herbert Edgar Holmes, published first in 1912 by the Haswell Press in Lewiston. Also of interest to Maine Catholic history is the fact that the first consecrated host made in the new world was made by wheat grown by the same Father Biard, in the Fall of this same year, 1611.

The First Mass Said In Maine

The first Mass that ever was said in the country of what is now the Province of New Brunswick, and the first administering of the sacraments of Penance and Holy Eucharist, took place in the Fall of the year 1611. Biencourt and a ship’s company, together with Father Biard went on an expedition to the west to trade with the Indians living on the Kennebec River for corn and what other food they could get to help through the famine which they knew would come upon them during the next winter at Port Royal. On the way, Biencourt determined to hunt up the Maloans, (people from Malo in France) who were poaching, as we would say now, upon the lands and waters owned by Biencourt’s father, Poutrincourt. These people gave the men who had rightful grants from the Crown great trouble, as they hunted and fished, and what was a worse offense, traded with the Indians, over the lands reserved by lawful grant, illegally and wrongfully, without permission and without making compensation. Biencourt sailed up the St. John River several leagues and came upon their encampment. Their commander, Captain Merveille, was away at the time, but came into camp during the night, and was immediately taken prisoner by Biencourt. The next morning a peace was patched up between Biencourt and the Maloans and the latter agreed to recognise the superior title and authority of Biencourt and to make compensation for their illegal trading. Father Biard then said Mass and Captain Merveille made his confession to the Father and received communion together with three of his men.

However, to us who are studying the early history of Maine, it is of greater interest to know that the first Mass said on the soil of the State of Maine was said in the month of October, 1611, on an island in the Kennebec River, three leagues from its mouth. It is a pity that Father Biard leaves us no description of that island by which we can identify it today from among the great number of islands in the lower Kennebec. It lies between Bath and the sea, about three leagues from the mouth of the river, and imagination must supply the rest. The Jesuit relates it in these words:

“We arrived at the Kinibequi towards the end of October. Kinnibequi is a river near the Armouchiquois, in latitude forty-three and two third degrees, and southwest of Port Royal about seventy leagues or thereabouts. It has two quite large mouths, one distant from the other at least two leagues; it is also cut up by numerous arms and branches. Besides, it is a great and beautiful river; but we did not see good soil there any more than at the St. John River. They say however, that farther up, away from the sea, the country is very fine and life there agreeable, and that the people till the soil. We did not go farther up than three leagues; we whirled about through so many eddies, and shot over so many precipices, that several times it was a great miracle of God that we did not perish. Some of our crew cried out at two different times that we were lost; but they cried too soon, blessed be our Lord. The savages cajoled us with the hope of getting corn; then they changed their promise of corn to that of trade in beaver skins. Now while this trading was going on, Father Biard had gone, with a boy, to an island nearby, to celebrate Holy Mass.”

The company traded with the Indians and once came near to having trouble with them, but the peace was not disturbed, and they sailed away leaving behind them a good opinion in the minds of the Indians. It seems that these Indians had good reason to fear and hate the white men because (as I have stated in a former chapter) the English in 1608 had abused them shamefully. Father Biard says: “These people do not seem to be bad, although they drove away the English who wished to settle among them in 1608 and 1609. They made excuses to us for this act, and recounted the outrages they had experienced from the English; and they flattered us, saying that they loved us very much, because they knew we would not close our doors to the savages as the English did, and set our dogs upon them.” This is a different description from what has come down to us from the English writers, as I shall show later.

Maine History News Headlines

Wood Island preservation group gets help from Old York
Seacoastonline.com
By Deborah Mcdermott KITTERY, Maine — The board of the Old York Historical Society last week voted for the first time to help an organization outside the town’s boundaries, agreeing to assist the Wood Island Life Saving Station Association in Kittery

Column: History Buffs discuss the new Swampscott calendar
Wicked Local
The cover for the 2012 Swampscott Historical Society Calendar shows the passenger ferry Swampscott in Maine in about 1910. By Betty Dean Holmes/Wicked Local At the History Buffs October meeting, a dozen of us discussed the 2012 Swampscott Historical

Clubs and groups
Foster’s Daily Democrat
ELIOT — The Eliot Historical Society invites you to join them on Nov. 7 at 7 pm at the John F. Hill Grange, State Road. Eliot Maine. Stephen Dow will present the “27th Maine” , the volunteer regiment of York County during the Civil War

Categories: Acadian history, breaking news, headlines, history, stories, Uncategorized, weird Maine news | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

Note: If you have problems with the links, simply cut/copy and paste into your browser to open them.

Adelbert Ames and His Recollection of the Attempted Robbery in Northfield

Adelbert Ames was born in Rockland, ME, on Oct. 31, 1835. He graduated West Point Academy in 1861 and was commissioned to the 2nd U.S. Artillery and fought in the First Battle of Bull Run where he earned the Medal of Honor. He was later reassigned to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862 where he fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg…

Hurricanes of New England
Maps are available at the Weare Historical Society if you’d like to walk through … on record as the costliest and deadliest storm in New England history…

Old house requires special, loving care
I have had the privilege of … In the end, they offered the house to the Norway Historical Society…

Audience Calendar
Illustrated Lecture: History of Silk in America, Nancy Greenleaf and Sally Williams, Hiram Historical Society, free. 625-4762. 2:30 pm Saturday. …

Bangor Museum and History Center getting a museum makeover
A week after selling a rare … And with the Massachusetts Historical Society, which already has volumes one …

Three Chums tell tales of friendship at Lovell’s Brick Church Sept. 9
Gilman, a New Hampshire storyteller who periodically wanders into Maine… Baked Bean Awareness Month speaker for the Fryeburg Historical Society. …

Prospect News
The Prospect Historical Society will hold a meeting Sept.12th. in the Town Hall at 7:00 PM. Will be discussing the final Yard Sale at the Marsh School…

Publication on Dover-Foxcroft will be a genealogist’s treasure
The couple has long been involved with the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society and its home at the Observer building. Nancy is former president of MGS, and Jack is the current president. The Maine Genealogical Society produces its special publications …

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

It has taken more than 10 years, but recent place name changes approved by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names have removed the final racial slurs from Maine maps. The six locations, all in Aroostook County, are now named Scopan, Scopan Inlet, Scopan Knob, Scopan Lake, …

Archaeologists in Illinois dig to find civilization that vanished

The largest excavation of a prehistoric site in the country is poised to solve a riddle about Illinois prehistory that has lingered for a century — where did the Mississippians go? And why? An enormous dig of a village site first inhabited about 1050 A.D. is providing so much data and so many artifacts that archaeologists are daring to speculate that basic questions about the Mississippians will finally be answered.

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From Museums of Old York:

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

PLEASE NOTE:
The “History Challenge” programs previously scheduled for Thursday, September 1 and Thursday, September 8 at 7 p.m. in The Parsons Center have been cancelled.
Our regular programming and exhibits in The Parsons Center will be suspended from September 1 through September 11 so that we may bring you The Fourth Annual Antiques Show!

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

19 “The Country Heer is Plentiful” exhibit of Trade, Religion and Warfare and Southern Maine 1631-1745 resumes in the upstairs gallery at The Parsons Center during regular museum hours.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Click here to view the scrumptious menu on our website. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany the hearth-cooked meal. Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Seating is limited to twenty and reservations are required. Please email Richard Bowen or call (207) 363-4974 to make your reservation by September 21.

26 Needle Wizards. Every Monday morning starting the 26th of September. Join our Needle Wizards as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information email Cindi at registrar@oldyork.org.

29 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

October

3 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apple, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Remick Barn. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. $5 for teens and adults/ $15 for families. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

31 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

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From the Maine Historical Society:

MHS News

New Exhibit Explores One Way High Fashion Came to Maine

The new exhibit in the Lecture Hall Gallery, “Having in Paris a Great Success”: French Fashion, 1928-1936, features sheets from Paris fashion houses that demonstrate one source of fashion inspiration for well-to-do women in Maine during the 1920s and 30s. The sheets, which are drawn from MHS’s Mildred G. Burrage Collection, include beautiful hand-drawn illustrations of the latest styles and fabric samples.

This show is mounted in conjunction with Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In, our current museum exhibit.


Fall Program Highlights

Tuesday, October 4, 12pm
Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Thursday, October 13, 7pm
Book Event: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm
Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Wednesday, October 26, 7pm

Book Event: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Presenter: Colin Woodard, Author

Thursday, November 10, 7pm
In Partnership with the Colonial Dames in Maine
Tales from an Art Detective: Tracing Nazi-era Provenance at the MFA

Presenter: Victoria Reed, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Categories: antiques, archeology, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, indians, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maine History News for 01 March 2011

Last living U.S. World War I veteran dies
Frank Buckles, the last living U.S. World War I veteran, has died, a spokesman for his family said Sunday. He was 110.
Buckles “died peacefully in his home of natural causes” early Sunday morning, the family said in a statement sent to CNN late Sunday by spokesman David DeJonge.
Buckles marked his 110th birthday on February 1, but his family had earlier told CNN he had slowed considerably since last fall, according his daughter Susannah Buckles Flanagan, who lives at the family home near Charles Town, West Virginia.

Mark Your Calendars! Heritage Preservation’s 2011 Annual Meeting will be held on June 1st in Philadelphia, PA. Click here for more information.

Dr. Joyce Hill Stoner is the recipient of the 2011 College Art Association/Heritage Preservation Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation. Click here to read more.

The Underground Railroad Quilt Code – Truth or Myth?
The Sesquicentennial of the Civil War has also brought renewed interest in the Underground Railroad, and a talk this Saturday at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park will examine an intriguing question: “The Underground Railroad Quilt Code – Truth or Myth?”
Information about the event notes, “The Underground Railroad (UGRR) has captured the imagination of the country, and stories of its use have been published and repeated in countless books and songs over the years. One associated story that has received much attention over the past decade has been the tale of the UGRR ‘quilt code,’ a means by which escaping slaves could ‘read’ quilts hung outside houses to find their way north to freedom….

Rural anglophones a vanishing breed in Quebec
Back in 1989, a National Film Board documentary titled Dis paraitre warned that Quebec’s French culture could disappear within a couple of decades.
That doomsday scenario has not come true. But there is a group whose presence is fading in some parts of the province. Anglophones. Quietly, without fanfare, English-speakers are disappearing from regions where the roots of both language communities run deep. For rural anglophones, the prospect of Disparaitre poses a vexing question: Who will remember them after they are gone? That is a constant preoccupation for Donald Stewart, the last anglophone in Irlande, a community of 950 near Thetford Mines whose name betrays the origins of its first settlers. Stewart, 73, is a retired miner who looks after the cemetery at Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Maple Grove, a former English-speaking hamlet in Irlande that now survives only in memory. History weighs heavily on his shoulders….

204 and Longfellow’s still got rhythm
The Longfellow Chorus and Maine Historical Society host events to honor the celebrated Portland-born poet….    

Tracking down Maine’s Ulster-Scot roots So a few years ago, John Mann of Bowdoin set out to redress this historical oversight by establishing the Maine Ulster–Scot Project, with backing from The

House restorer to discuss ‘Replacing the Irreplaceable’ Lincoln County Historical Association in its annual Winter Lecture Series. Fossel, an authority on Maine’s 18th century structures, will speak on


Stories from Maine Memory Network 

Online Exhibit:  

Capturing Arts and Artists in the 1930s  Despite the economic difficulties presented by the Depression, Maine thrived with artistic activity in the 1930s. Between 1933 and 1940, Emmie Bailey Whitney, editor of the Lewiston Journal Saturday Magazine, and her husband G. Herbert Whitney, an accomplished amateur photographer, chronicled the work of a number of artists, writers, and others connected to the arts in Maine. Their newspaper articles and accompanying photos celebrate the 1930s version of Maine’s “creative economy.”
View the exhibit. 

Tuesday, March 15, 7 PM

Lecture: History of American Landscape and Garden Design 

Presenter: Lucinda A. Brockway, Past Designs, Kennebunk

Saturday, March 19, 10 AM-12 PM

Genealogy Workshop: Introduction to Online Genealogy Resources at MHS  

Presenter: Jamie Kingman Rice, MHS Public Services Librarian   

 For more information and a complete listing of programs, events, and news,

visit our website.


Categories: articles, breaking news, headlines, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maine History News for 16 Jan 2011

Online Exhibit: Protesting in Maine

As Americans pause today to remember the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., we honor Maine people who have protested and worked for social change. Mainers played an active role in the movement for civil rights for African-Americans in the 1950s and ’60s, fighting for racial equality in Maine, at rallies in Washington DC, and in marches, protests, and actions throughout the South. This online exhibit explores some of the issues, causes, and moments throughout Maine history when Mainers have stood up and fought for change. View the exhibit.

Maine Ski museum focuses on Nordic, manufacturing history

KINGFIELD — The Ski Museum of Maine is presenting  two Fireside Chats focusing on the state’s rich skiing heritage on Friday, Jan. 21, and Sunday, Jan. 23. The first is titled “Maine’s Nordic Skiing Heritage: 1870-2011&r…

Tourists Mimic Polar Pioneers, Except With Planes and Blogs

Tourists, adventurers and history buffs are lining up to visit the South Pole this year and next in honor of the 100th anniversaries of two polar expeditions.

From the Penobscot Marine Museum:

PMM Presents Three Historic Photo Exhibits

This winter and spring, Maine residents can enjoy three free exhibits of vintage photographs from PMM’s photography archives. Free receptions are scheduled for two of the exhibits later this month in Belfast

 
 

Both Belfast exhibits are from the museum’s Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. collection. The largest single collection of historic photography in Maine, the Eastern collection consists of nearly 50,000 images of Maine and other New England states and upstate New York. A publisher of “real photo” postcards, Eastern Illustrating was founded in Belfast in 1909, and remained in business into the 1950s.

 
 

The third exhibit, in Ellsworth, is from the collection of The Atlantic Fisherman – once the industry’s premier trade journal for New England. The collection provides an unmatched look at commercial fishing during the fifty years after engines replaced sail.

 
 

All three exhibits will be available to travel around the state at the conclusion of  their scheduled runs. Parties interested in hosting exhibits should contact Kevin Johnson: 207-548-2529 ext.210

 
 

WALDO COUNTY THROUGH EASTERN’S EYE

On display: now through April 30

Free Reception: January 27, 5-7 p.m.

Where: Allen & Sally Fernald Gallery, U-Maine Hutchinson Center, 80 Belmont Ave., Belfast

Times: M-F, 8 a.m.- 7 p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m. – noon

Description: Town and country views from almost every town in Waldo County. Research was conducted by individuals and historical societies from throughout the county.

More information: 207-338-8000

MAINE AGRICULTURE: VIEWS FROM THE PAST

On display: Jan. 26 – Mar. 21

Free Reception: Jan. 28, 5-7 p.m.

Where: Maine Farmland Trust Gallery, 97 Main St., Belfast

Times: M-F, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Description: Images of potato and dairy farming, the poultry industry, corn husking, canning operations and other scenes from Maine’s agricultural past. Researched by renowned Maine historian William H. Bunting.

More information: 207-338-6575

 
 

IMAGES FROM THE ATLANTIC FISHERMAN

On display: now through March 31

Where: The Maine Grind, 192 Main Street, Ellsworth

Times: Mon.-Sat., 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Description: Photos from 1920s to the 1950s of working boats and the men who crewed them; shore-based fishing methods; and shoreside supply, processing and distributing activities.

More information: 207-667-0011

From the Maine Historical Society;

Online Exhibit: Les Racquetteurs

Snowshoeing took Lewiston by storm during the first half of the 20th century. The spark: Louis-Philippe Gagné, a newspaper editor who immigrated to the area from Quebec in 1922. He brought his love for the sport, and quickly helped form more than a dozen hugely popular snowshoe clubs that hosted athletic events and provided an important social space for the Franco community. Visit the exhibit.

Elise Fellows White

Library staff have recently finished processing a collection of materials related to Elise Fellows White (1873-1953) given to MHS by Houghton White in 2010. Elise was a violin prodigy from Skowhegan whose musical talents and adventuresome spirit took her around the country and abroad from an early age. She kept journals and saved letters, programs, and photographs throughout her life, all of which offer wonderful glimpses into life in Maine and beyond. The collection is now available to researchers in the library. See the catalog record, and related material on Maine Memory.

HNN’s Coverage of the AHA

Highlights from the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Boston
David A. Walsh

Categories: Art Exhibit, articles, breaking news, events, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine Historical Society, Penobscot Marine Museum, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maine History News

Maine history news headlines…

Cummings Mill site to be dedicated

NORWAY — The former C.B. Cummings & Sons Co. mill site will be dedicated by its current owners, Western Maine Healthcare Corp., in the near future, hospital officials say. Details of the ceremony were not available, said Kate Wight, community relations coordinator, but they are …

Grandfather clock donation clicks with historical society
(This one’s a great piece for clock lovers from all over!)

KINGFIELD — The Kingfield Historical Society will showcase one of its new treasures during this weekend’s Kingfield Days festivities. Last year, George Stanley, a descendant of the well-known Stanley brothers who invented the Stanley Steamer, asked Society president David Holmes, if he’d …

Mount Desert Island lures leaders past and present

By REBEKAH METZLER Kennebec Journal AUGUSTA – Trains, steamships, yachts, and now planes. That’s how presidents have traveled to Mount Desert Island for summertime getaways…

Wanted: Old library chairs with stories to tell

By STEPHANIE HARDIMAN Staff Writer The VIA Group is offering cash to libraries across the nation for chairs with backgrounds…

Roxbury’s 175th anniversary to feature two parades

Two of 220 town of Roxbury 175th anniversary cookbooks, which include a wide variety of recipes collected from people in the River Valley area and their extended families, are shown here with a drawing of the town’s old train depot, which will adorn anniversary celebration T-shirts that will be s…

New cookbook for Roxbury’s 175th anniversary quickly selling out

ROXBURY — No self-respecting cook should be without the town of Roxbury cookbook, a collection of recipes from the River Valley area that began selling last month for $10 each. Out of 220 books printed and sold starting last month, 30 remained as of Friday afternoon. “We did w…

Local murals highlight historical society program

FARMINGTON — The work of Rufus Porter, well known for his painted landscape murals in local homes during the early 1800s, will be featured in a presentation by Jane Radcliff during the Farmington Historical Society’s July 12 meeting. The society meets in the basement of Henderson Me…

New mineral museum aims to involve local residents

Posted July 15-Larry Stifler likens his effort to bring world-class Maine gems back home for display in a new museum in Bethel to “a Greek coming to the British Museum to take back part of the Parthenon.” Stifler and his wife, Mary McFadden, own a summer home in Albany. Their p…

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Maine Historical Society…

The Maine Historical Society invites you to a poetry reading and workshop…

 
 

Wednesday, August 4, 5pm
COMING HOME?

A Poetry Reading by Estha Weiner and Betsy Sholl, Poet Laureate of Maine

Estha Weiner brings her newest book, Transfiguration Begins At Home (Tiger Bark Press 2009) back home to Portland, to read with Betsy Sholl.  Hear the poets, who first met at The Stonecoast Writers Conference, weave their friendship and their poems as they consider how “home” shapes and shifts over time.  Maine, of course, plays a key role in that: Estha, a Portland native, moved away to go to college while Betsy moved here 27 years ago. Book signing to follow.

 
Wednesday, August 4, 9:30am-12:30pm
MAINE REVISED AND REVISITED:
A Poetry and Writing Workshop with Estha Weiner

This multi-genre 3-hour writing workshop welcomes your poems, short fiction, plays, and non-fiction. Its only requirement is a fresh vision of Maine, past or present, an attentive ear and eye, and supportive feedback for fellow writers.  (If you have work that has nothing to do with Maine, that’s OK too.)  We will read and discuss each other’s work, discuss the writing process, and participants will receive careful, helpful feedback, towards revision. Please bring 11 copies of your work. We may add a short in-class exercise or two, and discuss how you go through your day as a writer, even if you think you can’t!  Registration required by Friday, July 30. Fee: $100/person. MHS members/students: $75/person.

For more information or to register, please email Estha Weiner at: esthalynne@hotmail.com

Estha Weiner is co-editor and contributor to Blues for Bill: A Tribute to William Matthews (Akron Poetry Series, 2005), and author of The Mistress Manuscript (Book Works, 2009) and newly published Transfiguration Begins At Home (Tiger Bark Press, 2009). In the Weather of the World is forthcoming from Ireland’s Salmon Press in 2011.  Her poems have appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines. including The New Republic and Barrow Street.  She won a 2005 Paterson Poetry Prize, a 2008/9 nomination for a Pushcart Prize, and  a 2008 Visiting Scholar at Stratford’s Shakespeare Institute. Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at City College of NY, Estha serves on the Board of Slapering Hol Press, Hudson Valley Writers Center and is founding director of Sarah Lawrence College NY Writers Nights.

 
Betsy Sholl, Poet Laureate of Maine, has published seven collections of poetry, most recently Rough Cradle (Alice James Books, 2009). Don’t Explain won the 1997 Felix Pollak Prize from the University of Wisconsin, and her book The Red Line won the 1991 AWP Prize for Poetry. Her chapbooks include Pick A Card, winner of the Maine Chapbook Competition in 1991, and Betsy Sholl: Greatest Hits, 1974-2004 (Pudding House Publications). She was a founding member of Alice James Books and published three collections with them: Changing Faces, Appalachian Winter, and Rooms Overhead. Among her awards are a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts, and two Maine Writer’s Fellowships. Her work has been included in many anthologies and magazines. Betsy has been a visiting poet at the University of Pittsburgh and Bucknell University. She lives in Portland, Maine, and teaches at the University of Southern Maine and in the MFA Program of Vermont College.

Event Information
When: Wednesday, August 4, 2010,  9:30am-12:30pm and 5pm
Where: Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress Street, Portland, ME 

For more information: 207-774-1822 or info@mainehistory.org or www.mainehistory.org 

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Museums of Old York

 

Museums of Old York

2010 Annual Meeting

You are cordially invited to the

Annual Meeting of the Membership at:

The Visitor Center at Remick Barn

3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine

Tuesday, July 20, 2010 at 6:30 p.m.

We will vote on nominees for trustee positions and officers; hear the reports of the President, Treasurer, and Executive Director, and vote on proposed bylaw changes. Once business is done, we will introduce this year’s Elizabeth Perkins Fellows and hear briefly about their work.  Some of our Junior Docents will demonstrate traditional crafts they are learning.  Refreshments will include some authentic treats from the past baked that day by Junior Docents.

For more information or to download copies of the meeting agenda or the proposed changed bylaws please visit us online at http://www.oldyork.or

Please RSVP at (207) 363-4974


Opening Night Reception

21st Annual Decorator Show House

Just a reminder that the Opening Night reception for the 21st Annual Decorators Show House is a week from this Friday, July 16th.   Be among the first to view the newly decorated home and meet the designers who made it all possible. Admission is $50 and includes live music, heavy hors d’oeuvres, cash bar and a tour of this spectacular home.To reserve admission to the Opening Night Reception please have people contact The Museums of Old York at (207) 363-4974, or send mail in your reservation or give us a call.

The Show House will open to the public July 17th and run through August 14th on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 10 am to 5 pm; Thursday 10 am to 7 pm; Sunday 1 to 4 pm. The Show House is closed on Tuesdays. Parking will be on-site. A $20 admission fee will be charged at the door, advanced ticket sales available through the Museums of Old York Office.

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Penobscot Marine Museum


Meet Bestselling Author Linda Greenlaw
July 18, 3 pm

Commercial fishing captain, bestselling nonfiction author and mystery novelist Linda Greenlaw launches the Maine leg of her book tour for her latest – Seaworthy: A Swordboat Captain Returns to the Sea – in a talk and party jointly sponsored by Penobscot Marine Museum and our friends at Left Bank Books.

At the First Congregational Church, right next to the museum. Free.

Windjammer Exhibit Opens

July 1, Main Street Gallery

Maine’s passenger-carrying schooners are the largest commercial sailing fleet in the developed world and a resonant image of the state’s modern coastal communities. See their history brought to life in “Earning Their Keep,” a new exhibit incorporating historic photography, artifacts, ephemera, videos, and models. The exhibit features rotating displays of top contemporary marine photographers:
·     Benjamin Mendlowitz (July 1 – August 3)
·     Michael Kahn (August 5 – 24)
·     Fred LeBlanc (August 26 – September 14)
·     Neal Parent (September 17 – October 24)

Events:

7/19-8/1
Birchbark canoe building demonstration
An authentic birchbark canoe will be built at the museum using traditional methods.

7/24
Penobscot Bay Day
Multiple events at the museum. Details TBA.

AUGUST
10:00am
Children’s Events, Blue Hill
Activities with PMM educators at Blue Hill Public Library.
10-11am Mapping Penobscot Bay (ages 4-7)
11:30am-12:30pm All About Lobsters (ages 7+)

8/4

8/5
5:00pm-10:00pm
Gala and Auction
See below for details.

8/13-15
Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Show
Visit the PMM booth at this popular annual show in Rockland.

8/21
Belfast Harbor Festival
Another PMM exhibit at a fun waterfront festival.

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Independence History News

America’s Revolutionary Insurgents

(Audio file) LISTEN NOW By Meghna Chakrabarti

The Stamp Act of 1765. The Boston Tea Party of 1773. The Coercive Acts of 1774. When we think of the American Revolution, we think of a fuse that, once lit, burned slowly but steadily, fanned by the political philosophies of Enlightenment thinkers and the spirits of the Founding Fathers…..In Brunswick, Maine, once well-behaved townsmen forced a loyalist to dig his own grave. In the small town of Camden, N.H., local men and women forced a parliamentary sympathizer to straddle a fence rail as they beat him….Historian Tim Breen offers some surprising answers.

South Portland History Museum Opens

The South Portland Historical Society makes its new home in a house with ties to the city’s past as a center for shipbuilding….

Norway, state agree on land for Gingerbread House

NORWAY — A memorandum of agreement between the Maine Department of Transportation and the town of Norway to acquire a 2,346-square-foot parcel of land on Route 117 for the Gingerbread House was signed Thursday night by the Board of Selectmen. The vote was unanimous.

Book captures spirit of man who named Bangor

The eight pages of Noble genealogy is just one of many reasons to read Carol B. Smith Fisher’s “Rev. Seth Noble: A Revolutionary Soldier’s Promise of America and The Founding of Bangor, Maine

Categories: Books, breaking news, events, headlines, historical societies, history, museum news, radio program, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Margaretta Days Festival, and more news

Machias fest, book celebrate Revolution

Bangor Daily News- The saying goes that we are our stories. If that’s so, I’d like to be a Watts, specifically a descendant of Hannah (Watts) Weston, who at 17 carried ammunition through the woods to help the patriots fight the British in the Battle of the Margaretta, the first naval battle of the Revolutionary War….

History teacher from Milo lauded by national DAR

Bangor Daily News- A history teacher at Penquis Valley High School for more than 35 years placed third in the National DAR Outstanding Teacher of American History Contest this spring. Russell Carey, who grew up here, was nominated to receive the state honor by Tisbury Manor Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, in Monson.

Categories: events, Geneology, headlines, historical societies, history, Maine, preservation, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maine History News…

I have decided to get back into sharing the many history and preservation news headlines I’ve been reading and looking into around the state. Click on the links to go to the sources of these stories to read them in their entirety. And by the way, if you have a story to share, or maybe a press release regarding your group’s activities, email them to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com.

Civil War Feast; Mary Wierzbicki cuts carrots and onions while Bill Barr relaxes on a sunny afternoon in Lisbon on Sunday. Wierzbicki and her husband John cooked a Civil War era supper for about 30 members of the Lisbon Historical Society. The Wierzbickis are members of the 20th Maine, a Civil War reenactment gro…

Gathering to focus on historic preservation; Revitalization of historic downtown business districts can be done. “Main Street — and even our small village centers can thrive and retain the quality of life that is Maine’s special brand,” said Roxanne Eflin, program director of the Maine Downtown…

Historic pine coming down in Bridgton; A tree at what used to be the landing spot for steamboats carrying wealthy 19th century city tourists up Long Lake to Bridgton is about to be taken down. “I came upon it by accident,” said Alan S. Manoian, community and economic development director in Bridgton…

Gingerbread House inches closer to move; Plans to move the historic Gingerbread House on Main Street continue to move forward despite some land-transfer issues. “This is a slow and tedious process,” Norway Downtown President Andrea Burns said of the transfer of ownership and land to a local group estab…

Maine launches program to encourage park visits; AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Maine’s Bureau of Parks and Lands has launched a new program that aims to get more people out to state parks and historic sites. …

Willing spirits gather for Readfield’s Meeting House; He did 51 buildings in Maine. This is the only one that remains. … The building was listed on the US Register of Historic Places in 1982, so repair work …

Maine Reports: Burns crew films for Roosevelt documentary; CAMPOBELLO ISLAND – The historic Roosevelt home and international park on Campobello Island bustled with a crew from Ken Burns’ Florentine Films just days …

Student Website Highlights Lincoln History; It’s part of a program called the Maine Community Heritage Project, which is a joint effort of the Maine Historical Society and the Maine State Library. …

From the Maine Historical Society…

Eight Maine Communities to Launch New History Websites on Maine Memory Network

The Maine Historical Society is excited to announce the upcoming launch of new websites on the Maine Memory Network
(www.mainememory.net) dedicated to the histories of eight Maine communities.

The websites are being created by local teams from Bangor, Biddeford, Blue Hill, Cumberland/North Yarmouth, Guilford, Hallowell, Lincoln, and Scarborough through the Maine Community Heritage Project (www.mainememory.net/mchp), an initiative sponsored by the Maine Historical Society and Maine State Library. Funded by a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum & Library Services, the MCHP is designed to foster collaboration between local schools, historical societies, and libraries through technology and the study of local history.

Each team spent nearly a year researching their town’s history, digitizing local historical collections, developing online exhibits, and building their sites. The new sites will be launched at local celebrations in each community as follows:

Tuesday, 5/25, 6:30PM         Lincoln (Mattanawcook Jr. High School)

Wednesday, 5/26, 6PM        Blue Hill (Blue Hill Consolidated School)

Wednesday, 6/2, 6:30PM    Bangor (Bangor High School)

Thursday, 6/3, 5PM        Guilford (Piscataquis Community Middle School)

Tuesday, 6/8, 6PM        Scarborough (Scarborough Middle School)

Wednesday, 6/9, 11:30AM    Biddeford (McArthur Public Library)

Wednesday, 6/9, 6PM        Cumberland/North Yarmouth (Skyline Farm)

Thursday, 6/10, 6:30PM     Hallowell (Hall Dale Middle School)

Created by the Maine Historical Society and launched in 2001, the Maine Memory Network (www.mainememory.net) is a statewide digital museum that empowers communities to share their history and includes digital contributions from more than 200 historical organizations, museums, and libraries across the state.

For more information:

Maine Historical Society

489 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101

207–774–1822

www.mainehistory.org

www.mainememory.net

The Maine Historical Society promotes the understanding and enjoyment of Maine history.

And don’t forget…

188th Annual Meeting at the Franco-American Heritage Center, Lewiston


Join us for our Annual Meeting at the Franco-American Heritage Center (formerly St. Mary’s Church) in Lewiston, Maine.

Following a brief business meeting at 10:00 am, Denis Ledoux will present: From Facts to Memoir – From Genealogy to Stories. After a Franco style lunch, participants are invited to tour Museum LA, a few blocks from the Center.

Everyone welcome; Registration required. ($25/members, $30/nonmember) Call 774-1822 to register.

Event Information

When: Saturday, June 5, 2010, 10:00am – 2:00pm
Where: Franco-American Heritage Center

           46 Cedar Street, Lewiston, ME

For more information call 207-774-1822 email info@mainehistory.org


Categories: breaking news, civil war, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, preservation, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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