Posts Tagged With: heritage

Piscataquis River Fishways

This post is a continuation of a look at the fishing heritage of Maine’s angling locations, refer to “A Paradise for Anglers” post of 15, May, 2012 for the beginning article…

This being the time of the year it is, meaning fishin’ time in the Pine Tree State, I thought I would share some excerpts from the 1907 Bangor & Aroostook Vacationist’s Guidebook. Historically speaking, Maine has been a destination of choice for many anglers, with the choices for game fish ranging from brook trout, to bass to togue and salmon, and then there is the offshore fishing as an option too. Remember as you read this that it was written over 100 years ago, and I share this here for the historical value these old guidebooks provide to the reader today. I intend to share the entire section on angling from this book in shorter segments, so come back tomorrow for more on Maine’s angling paradise from the bygone days!

Remember that this book is over a century old now, and the trains no longer carry passengers to any of these station, and in fact, none of these stations exist today. I include them here for those of you that might want to do a little treasure hunting and search for these old stations.

Piscataquis River Fishways

Piscataquis river; offers plenty of black bass and pickerel, and some trout; can be reached from any of the stations along the Moosehead lake division from Milo Junction to Shirley.

Seboois lake; offers white perch and exceptionally good pickerel fishing; waters flow through Endless lake and Seboois stream before entering Piscataquis river. Good trout fishing in these tributaries: Northwest pond, Seboois stream, Ragged Mountain pond and stream, Bear brook, Patrick brook, Endless lake (or Trout pond) and several smaller ponds. Nearest railroad stations: Schoodic and West Seboois.

Schoodic lake; offers landlocked salmon, trout, togue and black bass in abundance; flows into Piscataquis river through Schoodic stream, of which Hunt brook is a tributary. Tributaries: Norton pond and several smaller streams which flow into Schoodic lake, all well stocked with trout of good size. Nearest railroad station: Schoodic stream, of which Hunt brook is a tributary. Tributaries: Norton pond and several smaller streams which flow into Schoodic lake, all well stocked with trout of good size. Nearest railroad station: Schoodic.

Pleasant river; is well trouted in its upper waters; enters the Piscataquis near Milo Junction. Tributaries: Lower and Upper Ebeeme ponds, Roaring brook, Houston and Little Houston ponds, Houston brook, Mountain pond and brook, Big and Little Lyford ponds, West Branch pond, Hay and White brooks, Greenwood, Cedar, Spruce, Spruce Mountain, West Chairback, East Chairback and B ponds, Beaver and Guernsey brooks, all particularly well populated with trout. Nearest railroad station: Katahdin Iron Works.

Pleasant river; is well trouted in its upper waters; enters the Piscataquis near Milo Junction. Tributaries: Lower and Upper Ebeeme ponds, Roaring brook, Houston and Little Houston ponds, Houston brook, Mountain pond and brook, Big and Little Lyford ponds, West Branch pond, Hay and White brooks, Greenwood, Cedar, Spruce, Spruce Mountain, West Chairback, East Chairback and B ponds, Beaver and Guernsey brooks, all particularly well populated with trout. Nearest railroad station: Katahdin Iron Works.

Sebec lake, tributary to Piscataquis river; harbors landlocked salmon, trout, black bass, pickerel and white perch in quantity. Excellent trout fishing in these tributaries: Goose pond, Mill brook, Grape, Long, Second, Third, Fourth, Burden, Grindstone, Greenwood and the Benson ponds. Lake Onawa, another important tributary, has hordes of landlocked salmon and trout. Other more northern tributaries are the Greenwood ponds, Long Pond stream, Ixnig, Trout and Hedgehog ponds, Grindstone, South, Monson, Hebron and the two Spectacle ponds, Wilson stream, the Wilson ponds, Fogg, Bum and Trout ponds. All of these waters offer splendid trout fishing. Nearest railroad stations: South Sebec, Dover and Foxcroft, and Abbot Village.

To reach Lake Onawa, go to Brownville Junction or Greenville, thence over the Canadian Pacific railroad to Onawa station. Hebron and nearby lakes are best reached from Monson.

At Blanchard; good trout fishing in Blackstone brook, Mud, Spectacle and Thanksgiving ponds, Bald Mt. and Bog streams.

At Shirley; trout in Piscataquis river, Gove and Gravel brooks, West and Oakes bogs, Spectacle, Ordway, Indian, Trout,

Notch, Hound and Moxie ponds. Indian and Ordway ponds also offer togue of splendid size.

Next up in the “Paradise for Anglers”series is the Moosehead region

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Sawmills: a vanishing heritage

I actually made this vedeo some time ago, and had it over at Vimeo, so you may have seen it there already. Recently, I migrated all of my Vimeo videos over to my YouTube channel as this is going to be the platform for all of my video programs.

This one concerns the legacy and vanishing heritage of the old logging and lumbering days. Enjoy…

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MHS to Process CMP Collection

July 19, 2010

Maine Historical Society Awarded Grant to Process Central Maine Power Collection

The Maine Historical Society (MHS) has been awarded a Museums for America by the Institute of Museum & Library Services to process and provide access to the Central Maine Power (CMP) collection, one of the museum’s largest and most important recent acquisitions.

The CMP collection—donated to MHS by the company in 2002 and physically transferred in 2004—provides a case study of rural electrification in Maine from 1890 to 1998, one of the great technological transformations in American life. The collection is vast, consisting of approximately 1,878 objects and 1500 linear feet of archival material. It includes early electrical equipment and appliances; advertising, marketing and public education materials; and extensive documentation of the politics, economics, and business practices of the utility industry in the 20th century.

According to MHS Executive Director Richard D’Abate, the CMP Collection will be a resource of major significance to researchers in Maine and beyond and provide critical insights into key aspects of economic development and domestic life in the state. “This project will establish physical and intellectual control over the collection, provide comprehensive information about it online, support key goals of our strategic plan, and lay the groundwork for substantial scholarship, exhibition, and programming at MHS. Significantly, the CMP Collection provides valuable context for contemporary efforts to develop alternative energy sources in Maine.”

 

 

“Appliance and electrical store, Central Maine
Power,” c. 1920

Description of image; As early as 1916, CMP set up appliance stores
to sell products using electricity. The company operated stores in Augusta,
Brunswick, Dexter, Greenville, Rockland, Union as well as other towns.

For more information:

Maine Historical Society

489 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101

207–774–1822

www.mainehistory.org

www.mainememory.net

The Maine Historical Society promotes the understanding and enjoyment of Maine history.

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http://www.imls.gov/news/2010/071310.shtm

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The Institute’s mission is to create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information and ideas. The Institute works at the national level and in coordination with state and local organizations to sustain heritage, culture, and knowledge; enhance learning and innovation; and support professional development. To learn more about the Institute, please visit http://www.imls.gov.

Categories: collectibles, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, museum news, preservation, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tourists, Fort Halifax, Railroads, and Gundalows

Things seem to be cooking up in Winslow at the Fort Halifax historical site. A piece in Sunday’s Morning Sentinel describes the plan b y the Friends of Fort Halifax to improve the future of this piece of Maine’s past. Their plans include new parking, grounds and buildings. The article says Included in the group’s “master plan” are a new parking lot, entrance and welcome center, reconstructed historic buildings, new boat landings, gazebos and park benches, a 2-mile-long walking path and a riverboat offering dinner cruises. The price tag for all of this reportedly comes to about 1.5 million dollars. The piece further states that The intent is to turn the park into a year-round recreational and cultural hub.

All well and good, and I do wish these people the best of luck, but I am hoping that the historical significance of this site remains at the forefront of their vision. Too often well meaning people will take an area of great historical significance and turn it into just another amusement park in their quest to boost attendance at the site. Apparently the town and group share the idea that funding could come from some kind of a federal earmark, bad idea in my mind, and no local taxes or fundraising would be needed. My feeling is that zero dollars for these sorts of projects should come from any tax dollars at all. When people contribute of their own volition to a project they in turn become part of that project, even if in just a very small way.

By becoming part of a project you can take ownership of the project, and be proud of the outcome and more willing to provide continued support to that project. Obtaining funding from some impersonal federal grant or earmark is nothing more than taking anonymous donations from every single taxpayer in this nation. That being the case, how many of them will actually put any effort into that particular recipient project? Most people in the US have never even heard of Fort Halifax, so why should they care?

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You know, one of the things Maine has a history for is tourism, and it surprises me that more local historical societies don’t seem to want to connect to that part of Maine’s heritage by promoting themselves more. One hardly ever sees advertising for museums beyond local papers, and when you do, the museums are only open for a few hours each week, frequently at times not conducive to drawing any interest from possible visitors from away.

A Bangor Daily News article, Waterfront train proposed to Belfast councilors, tells of at least one organization, the Brooks Preservation Society, and their plans to take advantage of that heritage and try to entice more visitors to the Belfast area by enlarging the operations of the Belfast & Moosehead Lake Railroad by extending their tracks to the Belfast waterfront. Belfast is a great little community, and I hope things work out for everyone up there. By connecting the sea going and railroad histories of the area together they’ll go a long way towards improving the future outlook of preserving Belfast’s history.

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Wesget Sipu Inc. of the St. John Valley area has received a grant for the preservation of the cultural traditions of the Mic Mac and Maliseet tribes. I understand that the intent of this nonprofit group is to record the genealogies of the areas tribal population as well as collecting ephemera, pottery and other articles relating their heritage.

Speaking of grants, I also hear that the Gundalow Company received a $30,000 in funding to promote their educational program in assisting to preserve the Piscataqua Maritime Region, which extends from York down to the Hamptons in NH. The intent is to further share the educational resources in promoting the preservation of the coastal area with various historical and educational organizations such as Strawberry Banke, Museums of Old York and the Great Bay Discovery Center in NH.

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If you have something you’d like to share here regarding any of Maine’s historical or preservation organizations, please drop me a line at editor@touringmaineshistory.com. I’ll get it up as soon as I can. Happy history!

Categories: headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, museum news, preservation, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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