Posts Tagged With: grants

Norway’s Luther Farrar House Destroyed by Fire

Here is another batch of headlines for your history reading pleasure. As always, if you have something to share that is Maine history related please email it to editor@touringmaineshistory.com. If it’s an event, make sure you get it to me in plenty of time to share.

Loss of historic house a ‘tragedy’ for downtown
The destruction by fire of one of the oldest houses on Main Street has left another hole in one of the state’s most complete downtown National Historic Districts. “For Norway Downtown whose rehabilitation efforts hinge on significant historic buildings, this is a tragedy…

New barn for the Searsmont Historical Society A dedication ceremony for the new Searsmont Historical Society Barn will be held Saturday, May 28, and will feature a ribbon cutting ceremony, pig roast and barn dance.— Some small towns are…

Next Maine Event: Bug Light a breezy beacon for kite connoisseurs South Portland Historical Society board members will be manning the barbecue, grilling hot dogs and hamburgers. Chips and soda will also be available for purchase. KID-FRIENDLY FACTOR: What kid…

City seafaring family in spotlight Shipbuilding in Biddeford and Saco reached its height in the mid-1800s, when two or three ships per year were being built in shipyards on both sides of the Saco River, according to the archives at the Maine Historical Society. …

Despite $97,000 grant, Addison church may be lost
Despite having just received a $97,000 restoration grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the historic Church on The Hill in Addison may still be lost soon. Since 1798, a church has always stood on the top of the hill. The first, a community meetinghouse, was blown…

Acadian Festival, Cyr Family Reunion moving to August
The 34th Acadian Festival and the annual family reunion held at the same time in Madawaska are being moved from late June to Aug. 11-15 this year to coincide with International Acadian Day on Aug. 15. This year’s gathering is the Cyr Family Reunion, celebrating ancestors and descendants of one…

Early Declaration of Independence document winds up its 50-state tour in Bangor
A precious piece of America’s history — an original Dunlap broadside of the Declaration of Independence printed on July 4, 1776 — has visited each of the 50 states and on Saturday made Maine its last stop on its decade-long tour. Only 26 copies of the original…

Mill museum has support
Lisa Flynn worked at WestPoint Home until the end. “I never thought we’d shut down,” she said Saturday, seated around a table in the vast North Dam mill with several former co-workers, reminiscing…

Life at sea, revisited
A new exhibit at the Saco Museum explores 19th century maritime history through the life of sea captain Tristram Jordan and his family. The exhibit, Voyages and the Great Age of Sail, opens Friday with a free reception at 5:30 p.m. and runs through Sept. 4. The exhibit is a culmination of a history class of the same name at University of New England, which is team taught by UNE History Professor Elizabeth De Wolfe and Camille Smalley, program and education manager for the Saco Museum…

From the Maine Historical Society;


Online Exhibit: High Water

While many Mainers are thrilled that spring has finally arrived, others who live or work along the state’s swollen rivers watch rising water levels cautiously. This exhibit revisits historic floods and the impact they have had on local people and communities. Read more.

Thursday, May 19, 7:00 pm

The Annual Olmsted Lecture

The Longfellow Gardens: The Evolution of Two Landmarks

Speaker: Lauren Meier, Pressley Associates, Cambridge, MA

Join us to learn about the rich history and recent rehabilitation of the Longfellow Garden at MHS and the garden at the Longfellow National Historic Site in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Meier, a landscape architect with a specialty in historic preservation, contributed to the rehabilitation of both gardens. This event is held in partnership with the Longfellow Garden Club. Details.

Saturday, June 4, 9 am – 12:30 pm

MHS Annual Meeting: Looking (Back) at Television

Join us to conduct the official business of MHS! The annual meeting includes awards, the welcoming of new Trustees, and a talk by Fred Thompson, former head of the Maine Broadcasting System (1983-98), on the early days of television in Maine. MHS membership and event registration required. Details.

Saturday, June 4, 1 – 3:30 pm

The Dave Astor Reunion Show

Featuring Dave Astor with Tony Boffa, Steve Romanoff, and Fred Thompson

Join us to remember and celebrate one of Maine’s best-loved homegrown television shows, The Dave Astor Show (For Teenagers Only). Location: Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress Street, Portland. Details.

Categories: Acadian history, articles, breaking news, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, lighthouses, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

General Knox and Historical Maine Buildings

Well, I’m back to blogging about Maine history again. For reasons that I won’t mention here, search engine problems drove my ranking to the bottom of the heap. But changes have been made, and hopefully people will begin to find me again. I’ve also decided to change the format of my posting as well, so don’t be surprised that things just don’t seem the same around here anymore.

Fund hike keeps University of Maine museum entry free, an article in the Bangor Daily news relates a good story regarding the UofM’s Art museum. Apparently the Machias Savings Bank has increased its annual gift to the museum to $7500 allowing the museum to offer free admission throughout 2010. Kudos to the Machias Savings Bank for their gift and caring for the arts.

We also saw this past weekend the ending of a piece of Maine history as the last two P3 Orion’s left the Brunswick Naval Air Base ending 60 years of patrolling the Eastern Seaboard and helping to protect our seaways. The base, originally used as a training and stop off base during WWII for US, British and Canadian air force planes, was temporarily closed after the war ended before being converted to Naval use. At its normal level of use, BNAS provided homes and work for about 4,000 employees and their families, providing a great opportunity for the mid coast area by way of economic stability. Too bad the base closed, we’ll miss the Navy greatly.

Champlain’s Valley Voice has a good piece regarding Maine’s own General Henry Knox in From Fort Ticonderoga to Boston: The Wintry Trek of Henry Knox. The story relates to Knox’s efforts to relocate 60 tons of artillery from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston in 1775. WABI has a nice video piece regarding the historic Liberty Hall in Machiasport as the historic Restored Belvedere Tower
cupola was returned to the top of its bell tower. It’s amazing how some of the restoration takes place on these historic properties with all of the details and work it takes to return Maine’s beautiful architecture to where it once was.

Foster’s Daily Democrat reports that tours are now being offered at the historic Hurd Mansion on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 1 to 3 PM at a cost of ten dollars per person. Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., was quoted in the article as saying the Hurd Manor was “the most outstanding example of its style in southern Maine and nowhere in the state does a more impressive Queen Anne—Eastlake residence exist.” The paper also reports that the Sanford
Mill yard makes the National Register,
as the historic property was recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Yard was established by Thomas Goodall in 1867 and became a major source of employment and industry in the area, until it was sold off by Burlington Industries in 1955.

Another couple of interesting articles related to Maine history in that same paper are Ski Museum of Maine and North Berwick Historical Society holding ‘Fireside Chat’
and Funds sought for historic exhibit at North Berwick’s Olde Woolen Mill complex. Ever noticed that some papers place more interest in history than others? I think it’s important to realize that there really is a lot of activity in the preservation and sharing of history here in Maine, but the bulk of it goes on behind the scenes, relatively unnoticed by the public. Fosters Daily Democrat is just one paper that gives these projects and news the coverage they deserve. Three cheers for Fasters, and I hope they can continue with their efforts in these days of closing newspapers.

As I gear up for the coming year, I’ve decided to do my column on a weekly basis which will give me more time to get around and visit. Writing as much as I do consumes a lot of time, so I really need to begin concentrating on various projects, and some of these projects will be terminated. However, I’m still here, and things will progress. If you have some news you’d like to share, enter it into the comments or email it to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com and I’ll consider including it. Also, if you have a link to place on the links page, or an event for the events page, please feel free to email the information to me at the same address.

Categories: Art Exhibit, events, historic buildings, historic preservation, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Grants in the news…

John Deere Foundation announces grant…

$3 million in grants given in Pennsylvania….

Today’s Almanac…

Categories: Almanac, museum news | Tags: | Leave a comment

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