Posts Tagged With: Fort Knox

A Haunted Maine Fort?

Maine Fort to be Featured on TV Ghost Show Maine’s Fort Knox is going to be featured on a TV program about ghosts. The Department of Conservation says stars of SyFy Channel’s program “Ghost Hunters” will reveal their findings next Wednesday about whether the fort along the Penobscot River near Bucksport is haunted. State park historian Tom Desjardin says it’ll be nice to see Fort Knox presented on the national stage. Desjardin says there are no official reports of haunting at Fort Knox, and only three soldiers on record died while at the fort….

Mementos of a Royal Hawaiian Love Story A matched set of silver goblets. A great golden bed. A marvelous and mysterious hand-stitched quilt of a unique design not found in the index of the Hawaiian Quilt Research Project. These are the mementos of one of Hawaii’s great love stories between a young man with royal Hawaiian blood in his veins and a hula dancer. The two young people, both famous in their own way, seemed fated for each other, and in the end, spent the rest of their lives together. View some of the items that help to tell this Hollywood-like Honolulu love story. Read “Mementos of a Royal Hawaiian Love Story”

Finding history in a rocking chair The first time, she had a desk and chair from the Maine Senate that were given … the Caribou Historical Society who might have an interest in my treasure. …

Wabanaki culture, history explored Colonial-era Wabanaki culture and history will be spotlighted Sunday, April 10 at the Camden-Rockport Historical Society’s next Maine Living talk. …

Tuesday’s Calendar — April 5 Anson Historical Society, 6:30 pm, Anson town meeting room; All are welcome. … a licensed Maine falconer will speak about the life history and ecology of …

Et Cetera: Listings Fundraising Card Party, benefits Falmouth Historical Society, Holy Martyrs Church, … 10 am to 1 pm “Horse-Drawn Vehicles in Maine,” slide presentation and …

Historical society creates craft fund to honor member The Bethel Historical Society’s board of trustees voted unanimously and preserve traditional crafts relating to the history of western Maine,

The Civil War: 01 April 1861 to 09 April 1861

April 3.—Dispatches were received in “Washington to-day, confirming the reported reinforcement of Fort Pickens; and the Cabinet held a long session, without coming to any definite conclusion in regard to the long-mooted evacuation of Fort Sumter. One company of artillery left Washington for Fort Hamilton, and two more are to follow to-morrow. Unwanted activity also prevails in the navy, several vessels being rapidly fitted for service. — World, April 4.

—The mortar batteries on Morris’ Island, Charleston harbor, fired into an unknown schooner. She displayed the stars and stripes, and put to sea. A boat from Sumter with a white flag went out to her; nobody hurt. A shot had gone through her.—{Doc. 49.)

—All officers of the Southern Confederate army, on leave of absence, were ordered to their respective commands.—Times, April 5.

—The South Carolina Convention ratified the Constitution of the Confederate States, by a vote of 114 to 10.—Tribune, April 0.

—The Charleston correspondent writes: “By the by, let us never surrender to the North the noble song, the ‘Star-Spangled Banner.’ It is southern in its origin; in sentiments, poetry and song; in its association with chivalrous deeds, it is ours; and the time, I trust, is not remote, when the broad stripes and brilliant stars of the confederate flag of the South will wave triumphantly over our capitol, Fortress Monroe, and every fort within our borders.”—Richmond Examiner.

April 4.—The Virginia Convention adopted, in committee of the whole, several of the series of resolutions reported by the majority of the Committee on Federal Relations, and rejected, by the decisive veto of 89 to 45, a motion to substitute for one of the resolutions an ordinance of secession, to be submitted to the popular vote.— World, April 5.

—Many rumors are in circulation to-day.

They appear to have originated from movements on the part of the United States troops, the reasons for which have not been communicated to the reporters at Washington as freely as the late Administration was in the habit of imparting Cabinet secrets. There can be no doubt that serious movements are on foot. The tone of the southern press for the last week, and the concentration of troops at Pensacola, indicate a determination to precipitate a conflict at Fort Pickens, probably with a view to hasten the secession movement in Virginia.—Tribune, April 5.

April 7.—General Beauregard issued an order, and sent a special messenger to Major Anderson, to give him an official notification that no further intercourse between Fort Sumter and the city would be permitted. — Times, April 9.

—The steam transport Atlantic sailed under sealed orders from New York, laden with troops and provisions. Among the troops is Captain Barry’s celebrated company of United States Flying Artillery. — Commercial Advertiser, April 8.

April 8.—Information having been given by the United States authorities to the authorities at Charleston that they desired to send supplies to Fort Sumter by an unarmed vessel, they were informed that the vessel would be fired upon and not permitted to enter the port. Official notification was then given by the United States Government that supplies would be sent to Major Anderson, peaceably if possible, otherwise by force. Lieutenant Talbot, attached to the garrison of Fort Sumter, and who accompanied the bearer of this dispatch, was not permitted to proceed to his post.

—Orders were issued to the entire military force of Charleston, held in reserve, to proceed to their stations without delay. Four regiments of a thousand men each were telegraphed for from the country.

Dr. Gibbs, surgeon-general, was ordered to prepare ambulances, and make every provision for the wounded.

—At midnight Charleston was thrown into great excitement by the discharge of seven guns from Citadel square, the signal for all the reserves to assemble ten minutes afterwards.

Hundreds of men left their beds, hurrying to and fro towards their respective destinations.

In the absence of sufficient armories, at the corners of the streets, public squares, and other convenient points, meetings were formed, and all night the long roll of the drum and the steady tramp of the military, and the gallop of the cavalry resounding through the city, betokened the close proximity of the long-anticipated hostilities. The Home Guard corps of old gentlemen, who occupy the position of military exempts, rode through the city, arousing the soldiers, and doing other duty required by the moment.

United States vessels were reported off the bar. Major Anderson displayed signal lights during the night from the walls of Fort Sumter.—Times, April 10.

—The State Department at Washington replied to-day to the Confederate State Commissioners, declining to receive them in their official capacity, but expressing deference for them as gentlemen. The Secretary expressed a peaceful policy on the part of the Government, declaring a purpose to defend only when assailed. — Tribune, April 9.

April 9.—Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania, sent a special message to the Legislature to-day, urging the necessity of purchasing arms and reorganizing the military system of that State. —Times, April 10.

—Jefferson Davis made a requisition on the Governor of Alabama for 3,000 soldiers. — Tribune, April 10.

—The Charleston Mercury of to-day announces war as declared. “Our authorities,” it says, “yesterday evening received notice from Lincoln’s Government, through a special messenger from Washington, that an effort will be made to supply Fort Sumter with provisions and that if this were permitted, no attempt would be made to reinforce it with men! This message comes simultaneously with a fleet, which we understand is now off our bar, waiting for daylight and tide to make the effort threatened.

“We have patiently submitted to the insolent military domination of a handful of men in our bay for over three months after the declaration of our independence of the United States. The object of that self humiliation has been to avoid the effusion of blood, while such preparation was made as to render it causeless and useless.

“It seems we have been unable, by discretion, forbearance, and preparation, to effect the desired object, and that now the issue of battle is to be forced upon us. The gage is thrown down, and we accept the challenge. We will meet the invader, and the God of Battles must decide the issue between the hostile hirelings of Abolition hate and Northern tyranny, and the people of South Carolina defending their freedom and their homes. We hope such a blow will be struck in behalf of the South, that Sumter and Charleston harbor will be remembered at the North as long as they exist as a people.”

—Steamers Illinois and Baltic, in commission for United States Government, got to sea from New York. They discharged their pilots at 7.30 A. M., and sailed southwardly.—{Doc. 60.)

—United States sloop-of-war Pawnee sailed from Norfolk at 6 P. M., with sealed orders. — Times, April 11.

Next week- the battle begins with the bombing of Fort Sumter on 12 April, 1861 at 04:30 AM from Fort Moultrie, and assorted batteries joining in…

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General Knox and Historical Maine Buildings

Well, I’m back to blogging about Maine history again. For reasons that I won’t mention here, search engine problems drove my ranking to the bottom of the heap. But changes have been made, and hopefully people will begin to find me again. I’ve also decided to change the format of my posting as well, so don’t be surprised that things just don’t seem the same around here anymore.

Fund hike keeps University of Maine museum entry free, an article in the Bangor Daily news relates a good story regarding the UofM’s Art museum. Apparently the Machias Savings Bank has increased its annual gift to the museum to $7500 allowing the museum to offer free admission throughout 2010. Kudos to the Machias Savings Bank for their gift and caring for the arts.

We also saw this past weekend the ending of a piece of Maine history as the last two P3 Orion’s left the Brunswick Naval Air Base ending 60 years of patrolling the Eastern Seaboard and helping to protect our seaways. The base, originally used as a training and stop off base during WWII for US, British and Canadian air force planes, was temporarily closed after the war ended before being converted to Naval use. At its normal level of use, BNAS provided homes and work for about 4,000 employees and their families, providing a great opportunity for the mid coast area by way of economic stability. Too bad the base closed, we’ll miss the Navy greatly.

Champlain’s Valley Voice has a good piece regarding Maine’s own General Henry Knox in From Fort Ticonderoga to Boston: The Wintry Trek of Henry Knox. The story relates to Knox’s efforts to relocate 60 tons of artillery from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston in 1775. WABI has a nice video piece regarding the historic Liberty Hall in Machiasport as the historic Restored Belvedere Tower
cupola was returned to the top of its bell tower. It’s amazing how some of the restoration takes place on these historic properties with all of the details and work it takes to return Maine’s beautiful architecture to where it once was.

Foster’s Daily Democrat reports that tours are now being offered at the historic Hurd Mansion on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 1 to 3 PM at a cost of ten dollars per person. Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., was quoted in the article as saying the Hurd Manor was “the most outstanding example of its style in southern Maine and nowhere in the state does a more impressive Queen Anne—Eastlake residence exist.” The paper also reports that the Sanford
Mill yard makes the National Register,
as the historic property was recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Yard was established by Thomas Goodall in 1867 and became a major source of employment and industry in the area, until it was sold off by Burlington Industries in 1955.

Another couple of interesting articles related to Maine history in that same paper are Ski Museum of Maine and North Berwick Historical Society holding ‘Fireside Chat’
and Funds sought for historic exhibit at North Berwick’s Olde Woolen Mill complex. Ever noticed that some papers place more interest in history than others? I think it’s important to realize that there really is a lot of activity in the preservation and sharing of history here in Maine, but the bulk of it goes on behind the scenes, relatively unnoticed by the public. Fosters Daily Democrat is just one paper that gives these projects and news the coverage they deserve. Three cheers for Fasters, and I hope they can continue with their efforts in these days of closing newspapers.

As I gear up for the coming year, I’ve decided to do my column on a weekly basis which will give me more time to get around and visit. Writing as much as I do consumes a lot of time, so I really need to begin concentrating on various projects, and some of these projects will be terminated. However, I’m still here, and things will progress. If you have some news you’d like to share, enter it into the comments or email it to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com and I’ll consider including it. Also, if you have a link to place on the links page, or an event for the events page, please feel free to email the information to me at the same address.

Categories: Art Exhibit, events, historic buildings, historic preservation, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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