Posts Tagged With: Fort kent

Gov. William King

Headlines  

History comes to life … and, for the first time, is available online

“It brings history to life,” said Amoroso, a genealogy buff who is director of digital projects for the Maine Historical Society. Amoroso was one of many people who trolled through data on millions of mid-20th century Americans that became publicly…

Fires a part of Fort Kent’s history

“That section of town had never burnt,” Chad Pelletier, president of the Fort Kent Historical Society, said this week. “Those were some of the town’s original buildings from the 1880s.” Pelletier referenced a map from an old Roe & Colby atlas showing…

Events  

April event at Museums of Old York

15 Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. Join this lively bunch on the third Sunday of (almost) every month from 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI, email or call 207-363-4974 ext 13.

18 – 20 April Vacation Camp – History of Science — KIDS PROGRAM 9:30am —1:30PM. Travel back through the ages to experience the world as people begin to understand scientific principles. $65 ($60 members) Ages 5-12. Preregistration is required. All activities take place at the Parsons Center on the corner of York Street and Lindsay Road in York, Maine.

Wednesday: Travel back to ancient Greece where Archimedes proved the use of the lever and pulley. Demonstrate these principles using our giant trebuchet to throw watermelons far into the York River and haul them back using pulleys!

Thursday: Meet 17th century scientist Sir Isaac Newton and help him prove universal gravitation and the laws of motion. Build a marble roller coaster, race toy cars, and build a bottle tornado.

Friday: Experience the world of color! Learn about natural dyes, perform some amazing science experiment, and Tie Dye a t-shirt with chemicals and plants.

20 Tavern Dinner. Traditional hearth cooked meal in a cozy, colonial tavern environment. Menu includes Baked Stuffed Clams, Assorted Pickled Vegetables, Herbed Cheeses, Crackers, and Nuts, Shaker Stew with Chive Dumplings, Fiddleheads Dijon, and Pecan Pie with Whipped Cream. Bring your Favorite Beverage. 6-8 p.m. at Jefferds Tavern, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Cost: $30 members / $35 non-members. Reservations are required. Please email early to reserve your space.

Events at the Maine Historical Society

Tuesday, April 10, 12pm

The Titanic: A Survivor’s Story

Speaker: Dr. Karen Lemke, St. Joseph’s College

Thursday, April 19, 7pm

The Civil War of 1812

Speaker: Dr. Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis

Tuesday, April 24, 7pm

Gateways to Portland: Rebuilding Veterans Memorial and Martin’s Point Bridges

A panel discussion presented in partnership with Greater Portland Landmarks

Spotlight on Maine History

Gov. William Ring.

Portrait ca. 1806 by Gilbert Stuart

THE first Governor of Maine was a son of Richard King, of Scarborough, who is said to have been a man of surpassing natural ability. He was a merchant, and laid the foundation of his fortune from the profits he received as Commissary under Sir William Pepperell.

William King, the seventh child of Richard, was born in Scarborough, Me., February 9, 1768. He was half brother to Rufus King, the statesman, who took such an important part in the formation of our government. William had few advantages in his boyhood. While Rufus was fitting himself at Cambridge for the great eminence he afterwards attained in the nation, William was tending a sawmill in Saco. Notwithstanding his lack of early educational training, his wonderful native ability, his great natural resources, and his strong, energetic intellect forced him early to the front. He set his standard high, and his ambition was untiring and almost unconquerable. Being possessed of wonderful perceptive faculties and a sound judgment, he relied upon these to carry him through, and they never failed him. In native endowment, he was thought to have been superior to his celebrated brother, Rufus.

When a young man Mr. King removed to Topsham, where he lived for a time, but as the Kennebec River offered superior advantages for his lumbering and ship building operations, he removed to Bath in or about the year 1800, where he carried on business very extensively. He afterwards established the town of Kingfield, in Franklin County, of which he was at one time principal owner.

He was a merchant and ship-builder, in which he acquired a large fortune. At one time, he was one of the largest ship-owners in America. In politics, he was a Democrat, and being first in everything he was connected with, he was the leader of his party in Maine—the master mind that managed all the party machinery. He wielded an immense influence in favor of the separation of Maine from Massachusetts. He was President of the Convention that framed the Constitution of the State, and it was his great wisdom and good judgment that directed all the affairs in the formation of the new State.

Mr. King became immensely popular with the people, and was elected the first Governor of Maine by an overwhelming majority. He administered the office with marked ability and to the great satisfaction of the people. Before the expiration of his term, he was appointed a Commissioner under the Spanish Treaty at Washington. Upon receiving this appointment, he resigned the office of Governor of the State and entered upon the duties of his new office, which he also discharged with great ability. He afterwards accepted the appointment as Collector of Customs at Bath, which office he held from 183 1 to 1834. He was a prominent Free Mason and was the first Grand Master of Masons in this State.

Several writers have described his characteristics and personal appearance. John H. Sheppard, Esq., of Boston, said of him: “In his person he was tall and of a striking figure; and with a finely formed head, strongly marked features, high forehead, and black, impending brows, he had a natural and majestic air of command which impressed every beholder with respect.” Deane Dudly wrote; “The sound of his voice seemed to echo grimly from the deep concaves of his eyes, which from under their forest-like brows would sternly look a command that was not to be resisted by ordinary mortals. So conspicuous was he in every circle where he moved, that the most indifferent observer failed not to notice him.”

Mr. King was unfortunate in his last years, not only in the loss of a considerable portion of his property, but in the loss of friends and relatives, which broke down his once splendid mind so that at last his sun went down in darkness. He died at Bath, Me., June 17, 1852, and his wife died in Portland, July 4, 1857.

Advertisements
Categories: history, Maine, museum news, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fort Andross Winter Antique Show

Steeple repairs to make history

The 186-year-old structure atop First Parish Church is being refurbished to match the original, even the wood

Community Calendar Feb. 1-12
Portland History Docents classes, Thursdays 9 am-12 pm, Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress St. #2, Portland, registration required, 774-5561 ext. 120. City of Portland Republican Caucus, 9:30 am, Riverton Elementary, 1600 Forest Ave., Portland.

Fort Kent Historical Society, archives unveil massive genealogical collection
Thanks to his efforts and with the support of the Fort Kent Historical Society and the Acadian Archives at the University of Maine at Fort Kent, the massive collection of books, photographs, notes, maps and related genealogical ephemera is now indexed…

Eastport’s 1814 history deserves commemoration
Members of the Eastport Border Historical Society have done a great job in opening the pages of our history to so many people. It is time, however, for the entire community delegation, Maine state government, members of Congress and all of Maine to get…

Maine to Ohio … Farmall collection finds new home

Alden Peabody, of Augusta, Maine, restored the tractors with his father, Harold. … and did not understand the history or the significance of the models…

FORT ANDROSS WINTER ANTIQUE SHOW!

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO THE SECOND ANNUAL FORT ANDROSS WINTER ANTIQUE SHOW!
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 26TH, 2012
FROM 10AM TO 3PM!
LOCATED IN TH HISTORIC FORT ANDROSS BUILDING
AT 14 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, ME 04011
THE SHOW WILL OFFER 54 PLUS DEALERS SELLING AN ASSORTMENT OF ANTIQUES AND ACCESSORIES!
THESE RANGE FROM 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY PRIMITIVES, FURNITURE, FOLK ART, ART, POTTERY, FIRE ARMS, NAUTICAL, JEWELRY, PEWTER, TEXTILES, AND SO MUCH MORE!
EARLY BUYING FROM 8AM TO 10AM, $5 ADMISSION FEE
FREE GENERAL ADMISSION STARTING AT 10AM!
FREE PARKING
FOOD WILL BE PROVIDED BY FORT ANDROSS’ OWN “THE FOOD DUDE” JAC CARY
AND DELECTIABLE DESERTS BY DAVE HANSEN!

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU!
“YOU ARE SURE TO FIND SOMETHING RARE, UNUSUAL, OR ONE OF A KIND!”

THANK YOU!

FOR SHOW INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
DEBORAH J. STUFFLEBEAM
SHOW MANAGER
207-607-4514
207-522-1977
207-607-4513-FAX
CABOT@WATERFRONTME.COM
WWW.CABOTIQUES.COM

February events at Museums of Old York:

For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

February

2nd Maine’s Museums: Art, Oddities & Artifacts. Janet Mendelsohn, author of Maine’s Museums: Art, Oddities & Artifacts (Countryman Press, 2011) will present “On the road to Maine’s Museums,” a talk, slide show and book signing at York Public Library. Explore Maine through its art, history, maritime, children’s and quirky museums. Mendelsohn, a freelance writer for the Boston Globe travel section and other publications, will offer ideas for day trips, mini-vacations and armchair traveling. Books will be available for purchase. The event, part of the York Public Library’s Brown Bag Lunch series, is co-sponsored by Museums of Old York. Free and open to the public. 12–1 p.m at York Public Library, 15 Long Sands Road in York. For information about the author, visit www.janetmendelsohn.com.

3rd George Marshall Store Gallery Opening Reception. Please join us for an opening reception for the gallery’s winter installation. Mary has installed the gallery with a selection of work; some will be familiar and others will be new to you. It is nice to have a reason to come together during these quieter winter days.
RECEPTION Friday, February 3, 2012 5-7 pm at George Marshall Store Gallery, 140 Lindsay Road, York, Maine, 207-351-1083
EXHIBITION DATES Through April 8, 2012
GALLERY HOURS By chance and appointment

8th & 12th “Let’s Talk About York History” at the Parsons Center. First sessions for 1631 Partners as well as our current and former Trustees. Feb. 8 at 5 p.m. and Feb. 12 at 3 p .m. Please email Laura at development@oldyork.org for more information and to RSVP. (General membership sessions will be held on the 26th and 29th of February – see below.)

17th Tavern Dinner. Traditional hearth cooked meal in a cozy, colonial tavern environment. Menu to be announced. 6-8 p.m. at Jefferds Tavern, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Cost: $30 members / $35 non-members. Reservations are required. Please email Eileen early to reserve your space.

19th Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI, email or call 207-363-4974 ext 13.

26th & 29th “Let’s Talk About York History” Discussion Groups Convene for our Members at the Parsons Center. Feb. 26 at 3 p.m. and Feb. 29 at 5 p.m. Please email Laura at development@oldyork.org for more information and to RSVP. (We have invited our 1631 Partners and current and former Trustees to discussion sessions earlier in February – see above.)

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, headlines, historical societies, Maine, Maine things to do, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Joshua Chamberlin’s Civil War Letters Online

Here are a few more headlines from around the state of Maine’s newspapers. If you have any headlines you’d like to share, please forward them to me at editor@remembermemedia.com, and please enclose a link to the article as well as the contents first couple of lines. Thanks for your help!

Not your Run of the Mill lumberman: George Gustin going strong at 78

WALES — From a padded seat in a tiny wooden and Plexiglas enclosure, George W. Gustin pressed buttons and pushed and pulled two fat gray joysticks, controlling the position and passage of a thick oak log. After mechanical dogs rolled and adjusted the log, vertical and horizontal saws trimmed it neatly into uniform 12-foot-long planks….

Dover-Foxcroft club caters to train buffs

There’s a new train on the tracks in Piscataquis County, and locomotive engineers are needed. more

America’s First Mile dedicated in Fort Kent

As of Sunday afternoon, C.R. Joy had the boasting rights and distinction of being the first visitor to Fort Kent photographed in front of the new granite sign marking the start of U.S. Route 1. In addition to marking the start of the 2,000-mile highway ending in Key West, Fla., the large white, gray and black granite stone debuted the town’s new slogan, “America’s First Mile.” more

Maine archive puts Civil War-era letters online

AUGUSTA, Maine — In 1862, Joshua Chamberlain, a 34-year-old language professor at Bowdoin College, wrote to Maine’s governor saying he wanted to serve in the war between the North and the South, … more

Reuse of mill celebrated

BIDDEFORD — More than 150 years ago, in 1845, Laconia Mill 1 was built. It was one of the first buildings to house Biddeford’s burgeoning textile industry. Eventually, the city’s mill district grew to an estimated 1.5 million square feet, and thousands of people were employed by the mills….

Developer seeks OK to demolish historic house

FREEPORT — Discussion of a proposal by a New York City-based company that owns several retail buildings in downtown Freeport — to demolish one of the last remaining historic Mallett houses on Depot Street to reconfigure a parking lot — was among the agenda items the Municipal Facilities Committee was scheduled to consider at a meeting this morning at the town hall….

Pictures from ‘The Forgotten War’

BRUNSWICK — For almost 60 years, Robert Galloupe has saved the 35mm negatives and yellowing snapshots he took while serving in the Army during the Korean War….

Christmas will be upon us soon, and what better gift is there for Christmas than a Maine history book. Salt and Pines, volume 1 is available at the low price of $20.00 plus shipping, but you need to order it quickly to have it by Christmas time! Simply click onto the Title link and you’ll be taken to a secured ordering site….

Salt & PinesSalt & Pines

Available as print: $20.00 or available as a download: $10.00

Salt & Pines: tales from bygone Maine is an anthology of stories and poetry about living in Maine’s bygone days. From the Islands of Casco Bay to the backwoods of Maine you’ll find tales to bring memories of your own to mind. Join us as we share Maine’s bygone days with;Allen Sockabasin, Ann Allen Brahms, D.L. Soucy, Dave Sargent, Doris Doggett, Jeanne Mason, Linda Aaskov, Luthera Dawson, Patricia Smith Ranzoni, Philip Candelmo, Philip Turner, Rene Cloukey, Roberta Gomez Ricker, Roy Fairfield, Ruth Richardson Maloney, Terrell Crouch, Thomas Carper, Tim Sample, Tom Fallon, Trudy Chambers Price, Salt & Pines, a taste of the ocean, the sound of the wind in the Maine forests….a combination you cannot find in any other state.

 

From the historical societies and museums…

Maine Historical Society;

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit:
Gifts from Gluskabe: Maine Indian Artforms

Gluskabe, a hero of the Wabanaki people, created the Indians and taught them to make what they needed while using the land and resources wisely. This online exhibit, featuring items from the collections of the Hudson Museum at the University of Maine, demonstrates how the artistry used to create objects was deeply connected to the natural world.  View the online exhibit.

Thursday, November 18, 7:00 PM 

Book Event: The Killing of Crazy Horse
Speaker: Thomas Powers, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist 

Join us for a special evening that will be recorded for C-SPAN 2’s Book TV.

MHS is fortunate to host acclaimed journalist Thomas Powers who will discuss his new book. Crazy Horse was perhaps the greatest Indian warrior of the 19th century, and his victory over General Custer at the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876 shocked the country. The details surrounding Crazy Horse’s death in federal custody the next year were the subject of great dispute and have remained controversial for more than a century. With the Great Sioux War as background, and drawing on many new documents, Powers will recount the final months and days of Crazy Horse’s life. Watch for Powers on WCSH’s 207 on Wednesday, 11/17. More…

New Exhibit Opens in Lecture Hall Gallery

Wednesday, November 17
The Art of December: Original Holiday Cards by Maine Artists from the Mildred Burrage Collection
 
This selection of holiday cards demonstrates the wide range of artists who called Maine home–such as Dahlov Ipcar, Stell and William Shevis, and Waldo Peirce— and exemplifies the personal connections of Mildred Burrage, whose love for the holidays is seen throughout her collection.

Join us December 3rd for the First Friday Art Walk and exhibit opening reception.

 

 

Penobscot Marine Museum;

 

Thanks for a Great 2010

Maine’s sardine industry was the subject
of our successful history conference.
 

75th Anniversary Exhibits Preview 

 
 

An exciting schedule of events is taking shape to celebrate Penobscot Marine Museum’s 75th anniversary in 2011. Among the highlights will be two major exhibits:

The Art of the Boat will honor George Wasson, author of Sailing Days on the Penobscot and one of the founding spirits of Penobscot Marine Museum.
  •  “75/75!” – 75 Favorites from PMM’s First 75 Years.
    The curator’s pick of the best, most historic, and most fascinating items in our collection. Located throughout the museum and on the web.
  • The Art of the Boat. A juried art show that explores the boat as art and the boatbuilder as artist. Artist submissions are invited. More information.

 

After of strong year of increased visitor traffic, Penobscot Marine Museum has battened down its exhibits for the season. Exhibits will re-open Friday, May 27, 2011 (Memorial Day weekend).

During our last open weekend, attendees of our 2010 history conference were treated to an evening and a full day of live and recorded media presentations, documentation and discussion about how Maine’s once-thriving sardine industry simply disappeared – a topic whose ramifications provide food for thought concerning employment and competitiveness on national and global levels. Speaking of food, the conference’s luncheon, the Great Sardine Cook-off, was a pescivore’s delight.

Of course we’re not going into hibernation just because the exhibits are closed. A number of presentations are scheduled through the rest of the fall, winter and spring, and we’re busy planning activities and exhibits for 2011. In addition to the items listed below, stay up to date by checking the website.

Historic Photo Exhibits and Talks

From the Atlantic Fisherman Collection

PMM’s photographic archives department has scheduled several exhibits and talks. All events are free. (Contact the venue to confirm dates and times.)

  • Historic Photos of Machias and Environs. Slide talk by photo archivist Kevin Johnson. At 28 Center St., Machias. November 18, 6:00p.m. Sponsored by Machias Historical Society.
  • Selections from the Atlantic Fisherman Collection. Exhibit at Maine Grind, 192 Main Street, Ellsworth. Now through April 30, 2011.
  • Waldo County Through Eastern’s Eye. Exhibit from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing collection. At the Hutchinson Center, 80 Belmont Ave., Belfast. January 2 through April 30, 2011.
  • Main Streets of Waldo County (presentation). Slide talk by Earle Shettleworth, Jr., Maine State Historian and Director of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission. At Belfast Free Library, 106 High St., Belfast. November 30, 7:00 p.m.
  • Main Streets of Waldo County (exhibit). At Belfast Free Library, 106 High St., Belfast. Now through December 30.
  • Historic Photos of Winterport and Environs. Slide talk by photo archivist Kevin Johnson. At Victoria Grant Civic Center, 40 Abbott Park, Winterport. December 13, 7:00 p.m. Sponsored by Winterport Historical Society. For more information: 207-223-4035.
Morrill, Maine (Eastern Illustrating & Publishing collection)

 

See you next time on Touring Maines History!

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine oddities, Maine things to do, museum news, Penobscot Marine Museum, preservation, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: