Posts Tagged With: civil war

Joseph B Stearns of Camden

Quite often we Mainer’s plug on with our lives giving scant remembrance to those who went before us, but while here were, in their own ways, great men, aiding and increasing the comfort and ability of the rest of us to make our own way in the world. Communicating with one another is just one of the many things that we have come to take for granted, and is one of the main conduits for transferring the information we use to make life better, in every way. Without the telephone, where would we be today?

But before the telephone, we had the telegraph as our main method of communication. However, there was a problem with using these methods of communication, as messages could only travel down a wire one at a time. If you wanted to send two messages at the same time, you needed two wires. Fortunately, The little village of Weld Maine gave us one of these men that we never hear much of, if anything at all today, that provided a solution to this problem. Joseph B. Stearns worked out, and patented a way in which multiple electrical signals could be communicated along both directions of a wire at the same time, thus revolutionizing the still young industry of telegraphy.

It also turns out that Mr. Stearns also played a small part in the War for Southern Independence by intercepting some information and providing it to President Lincoln in time to avert a disaster for our capitol city. Reul Robinson has the following to say about Stearns in his History of Camden and Rockport, Maine:

Joseph B. Stearns of Camden died July 4 [1895]. Mr. Stearns was born in 1831, was a native of Weld, Maine, and the son of poor parents. When fourteen years of age his father moved to Searsmont and three years later Mr. Stearns went to Newburyport, Mass., where he worked for a time in a cotton mill. In 1850 being 18 years of age, he began the study of telegraphy at Newburyport and remained there and along the line to Portland for four years. In 1854 he went into the fire telegraph office at Boston and in a few months was appointed superintendent. While in that position he went to Charleston, S. C, during the war of the rebellion to put in a fire alarm system and was able to perform an important service to his country by gathering information on his way home, which he gave to President Lincoln, thereby preventing the rebel army from occupying Arlington Heights and saving Washington from falling into their hands.

In 1867 Mr. Stearns was elected President of the Franklin Telegraph Co., which office he held between two and three years. It was at about this time that Mr. Stearns’ genius gave to the world one of the most important inventions of the century, namely, the duplex system of telegraphy, by which two messages can be sent over the wire at the same time. The invention brought him great wealth and will make his name forever famous. It was patented in 1868 and about three years later, he sold the right of the United States and Canada to the Western Union.

In 1872 he went to England to introduce his system there and after two years of effort Parliament gave him a royalty for the use of his invention. He also received royalties in France and Italy. In 1880 Mr. Stearns engineered the Mexican cable, putting 750 miles of cable into operation and in 1881 he engineered a line in Central and South America.

In 1882 Mr. Stearns went to Short Hills, N. J., where he lived until 1885 when he came to Camden to visit the family of James B. Swan, who were his relatives, and was so enchanted with the natural beauty of the place that he purchased a tract of land on the Belfast Road, with the object of making Camden his future home. He said that he had travelled the world over, and considered Camden the most beautiful place he ever visited.

The following year (1886) he erected the magnificent stone residence “Norumbega” where he passed the remainder of his life. Afterwards he bought large tracts of land farther up the Belfast Road, where he operated the large fancy stock farm known as “Sagamore Farm” and did much for the development and prosperity of the town. Mr. Stearns was twice married. His first wife was Lois M. Brooks by whom he had three children all of whom died young. His second wife was Amanda Edmonds of Portsmouth, N. H. The children of this union were two sons, Edward S., now of Thomaston, Maine, and Harry W., of Camden.

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Categories: Geneology, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Malaga Island

Malaga Island: A century of shame

By: Colin Woodard

Analysis: A new exhibit at the Maine State Museum tells the story of the eviction of Malaga Island’s residents, one of the state’s most disgraceful official acts ever.

Maps and letters by the ‘Great Geographer’ topic of museum speaker series …
Lake of the Woods Enterprise
Maine Historical Society librarian Frances Pollitt discusses the ‘Great Geographer’ with Lake of the Woods Museum educator Braden Murray following her presentation David Thompson – Letters and Maps at the museum speaker series, Tuesday.

Garvey to perform for Old Berwick Historical Society 50th anniversary concert
Seacoastonline.com
Folk-rock singer-songwriter Connor Garvey will perform at the society’s Counting House Museum (1 Liberty St., South Berwick, Maine) on Thursday, May 24. Doors open at 7 pm The concert is open to members of the public who join the Old Berwick Historical …

Maine students’ field trip includes Rollinsford Mills
The Union Leader
By JOHN QUINN SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — Elementary students from Central School are getting ready to take a Hike Through History and will visit several key stops in the downtown as well as cross the state line to learn about the nearby mills this Friday.

Owls Head struggles to save relegated one-room schoolhouses
Bangor Daily News
By Heather Steeves, BDN Staff OWLS HEAD, Maine — At its peak, this small coastal town had five one-room schoolhouses. Now only two remain, and both are out of use. To raise awareness about the legacy of the schools, the Mussel Ridge Historical Society …

Midlander to donate quilt to Maine museum
Midland Reporter-Telegram
It most likely was made on one of the Fox Islands — either Vinalhaven or North Haven in Maine — where Denham’s grandmother was born, he said. Once Denham realized the historical value of the quilt he began researching its history.

Waterboro presentation honors Civil War’s 32nd Maine
KeepMEcurrent.com
According to local historian Bruce Tucker, who gave a presentation on the 32nd Maine Regiment on May 3 to the Waterborough Historical Society, most of the men who signed up were either “really young” or “rather old,” since by the spring of 1864 most of …

Rockland neighborhood off Route 1 to be leveled
May 16, 2012 05:23 pm | Stephen Betts

ROCKLAND, Maine — Nearly every home along a street off Route 1 is expected to be demolished over the next week. The 12 cottage-style homes and several sheds date back more than a century in some cases. Applications were filed this week by David Landry of Superior Restoration to demolish…

An ‘amazing’ collection set to go public at USM

By: Kelley Bouchard

A Mainer’s painstaking work tracks the chief mode of travel from the U.S. to Europe for a century.

PHOTO: A place in Lewiston history

Susan Hall, right, owner of The Vault at 84 Lisbon St., chats with Jennifer Ferguson, left, and Rick Morris of the Lewiston Historic Preservation Commission on Thursday. The building at 84 Lisbon St. has been recognized as a piece of Lewiston history. The Healy Terrace on Ash Street and the Andro…

Categories: articles, headlines, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

WWII Warbirds Flock to Auburn

Hello everyone! I’ve been vacationing, so a lot of news has been missed, but here is another roundup (a long one this time) of Maine history news highlights and headlines from around the state. Lots of exciting things going on, from the visit of some WWII warplanes to the LA municipal airport in Auburn. Also, a lot of events are still happening all over, even though Fall is coming, along with the traditional shuttering of many historical society operating seasons.

As usual, if you have trouble with a link, copy and paste it into your browsers search window to visit the site. And if you have any news to share ot events to schedule, feel free to email them to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com.

I would like to give a shout out this week to Susan Sheffield of Dover Delaware for emailing a couple of excerpts from an issue of the New England Magazine with a story about Thomas B. Reed. It is unusual to find something like that so far from its home area. Thanks Susan!

Journalist/author visits Thomaston Historical
Thomaston — Author Kevin C. Mills will discuss his journey researching his family history to publishing his first novel, “Sons and Daughters of the Ocean,” at the monthly meeting of Thomaston Historical Society at the Knox Farmhouse, 80 Knox St. The…

Author to discuss Civil War regiment from Maine at Heritage Day in Brooks
Brooks — Brooks Historical Society will hold its annual Heritage Day Open House on Sunday, Oct. 9 from 1-4 pm at the Pilley House. New this year will be a featured speaker Peter Dalton of Northport, author of “With Our Faces To The Foe: A History Of…

Bird talks on ‘Rockland, Maine’s Tidal Turn’
Rockland — On Tuesday, Oct. 11 at 6:30 pm, Rockland Public Library will present a talk John Bird on his recent book, “Rockland, Maine’s Tidal Turn.” The talk is co-sponsored by the Rockland Historical Society. Bird has compiled a series of columns…

Clean gravestones with water, elbow grease, gentle brushes
When I hear them talk about their travels — a newly discovered cemetery in Mercer, a historical society meeting in Hope — all I can think of is a pinball machine pinging them around Maine’s graveyards in need. Bill’s slide presentation took us along…

25 things to do this fall — festivals, foliage and fun
See how Mainers from the past two centuries got dressed up at the Maine Historical Society’s fashion in Maine exhibit, which runs into 2012. Hats, jewelry, shoes, hair combs, walking sticks and several complete costumes are on display along with a wide…

Irish lecture series proving to be a hit
A former teacher, he is a member of the Androscoggin Historical Society, Maine Historical Society and the Irish American Club of Maine. He has authored two books, “Early Murphy Descendants of Mary Hurley and James McCarthy” and “Androscoggin Irish…

Hauling History: Jon Hentz to share lobster trap lore
But through personal memory, research and craftsmanship, Hentz has hauled up more than a century’s worth of trap-making that he will present at the Georgetown Historical Society building Tuesday night. The free talk will trace the development from the…

Surprise takes WWII veteran back to old heights

A ride in a historic plane honors a Maine Tuskegee Airman who served his country and came home to face racial bias.

World War II bombers make stop in Auburn

AUBURN — “You see them on TV, but you never really know what they’re like inside,” marveled Russ Allen of Auburn as he made his way slowly through the belly of the B-17G Flying Fortress at the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport on Monday afternoon. Inside, the plane was a…

Wings of Freedom bringing vintage planes to airport

AUBURN — Former New Gloucester resident Tom Driscoll picks up the leather flying jacket that his father, Lt. John Driscoll Sr., wore when he piloted B-17s in the 1940s. The jacket is a family treasure and symbol of the stories that John finally began telling about the war near th…

Old Otisfield Town House may be raised to save historic listing

OTISFIELD — The old Otisfield Town House and the approximate one-half acre of land it sits on may be raised 52 inches so it can retain its listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The wood-frame 1905 building on Bell Hill Road has its original oak chairs and voting booth…

From WorthPoint; Q& A: Talking 125 Years of Coke
This year, Coca-Cola marks the 125th anniversary of the creation of the famous beverage, first introduced as a fountain drink in Atlanta, Ga., in 1886. The popularity of the sparkling refreshment was aided by a merchandising frenzy, as thousands of mass-market advertising collectibles were produced over the years—from promotional items, holiday-themed items and signs—and all proved to be pretty durable, making collecting fairly easy. In that vein of thought, Worthologist Liz Holderman interviews Denis Bardin, the president of the Coca-Cola Collectors Club. Check out what hardcore Coke collectors are looking for these days. Read “Q & A: Talking 125 Years of Coke”

Museums of Old York Events:

October
3 Needle Wizards. Join us every Monday morning as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery at 3 Lindsay Road for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information, email Cindi Young-Gomes at registrar@oldyork.org.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apples, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Parsons Center. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. Members free. $5 for teens and adults and family rates for non-members.

Maine Historical Society Events:


Tuesday, October 4, 12pm

Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Get in the mood for the World Series with this wonderful new memoir of growing up with the Temple Townies in the 1940s and ’50s. Our Game Was Baseball follows A Soldier’s Son, Hodgkins’ poignant memoir of his childhood in Temple, Maine during World War II. Hodgkins interviews former team members, recounts his own passion for the Townies, and explores the central role the Townies played in the life of this western Maine community.

Friday, October 7, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk: Two Fabulous Fashion Exhibits

Thursday, October 13, 7pm

Book Talk: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light

Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm

Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Categories: antiques, articles, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, preservation, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Civil War Happenings in Maine & More!

Time tour looks at Deer Isle 150 years ago
Island Ad-Vantages
A Maine Town in the Civil War, by Vernal Hutchinson, with anecdotes such as this one, was the topic of a talk at the Deer Isle-Stonington Historical Society July 23 on the occasion of the annual Touring Through Time event held by area historical

Rachel Field — poet, writer, daughter of Maine
Bangor Daily News
As a result, her legacy is a cherished part of local history around the Cranberry Islands of Maine, of which Sutton is a part. The folks from Great Cranberry Island Historical Society have dedicated a good portion of their wonderful museum to Rachel

Barker book to explore Portland’s Irish in the Civil War
Portland Daily Sun
By David Carkhuff At age 8, Matthew Jude Barker began tracing his family history. At age 11, he joined the Maine Historical Society. So it may come as no surprise that Barker today is immersed in writing not just one but two books on Irish history.

Weekly calendar, Aug. 4, 2011
Bangor Daily News
BREWER — Brewer Historical Society, Clewley Museum, Civil War history and artifacts, 1-3 pm Thursdays, 199 Wilson St. CORINTH — Corinth Historical Society Museum, 2-7 pm Wednesdays, Main Street. HAMPDEN — Hampden Historical Society, Katherine

Museum slide talk to be held in Owls Head
Bangor Daily News
OWLS HEAD, Maine — A slide talk by the Penobscot Marine Museum’s photo archivist Kevin Johnson will be held at 7 pm Thursday, Aug. 11 at the Owls Head Community Building, 224 Ash Point Drive. The talk, sponsored by the Mussel Ridge Historical Society

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History of Bar Harbor Told Through PostcardsEarle Shettleworth pens new book
The newest addition to Arcadia Publishing’s Postcard History series is Bar Harborfrom local author Earle G. Shettleworth Jr. The book boasts more than 200 vintage postcards and memories of days gone by.By 1898, when the production of picture postcards began, Bar Harbor had become one of America’s leading summer resorts and second only to Newport, RI, in wealth and social standing. For the next six decades, the postcard recorded the transformation of this coastal island community into a middle class tourist destination.

Grand hotels, seaside mansions, and elegant gardens made way for roadside cabins and motels catering to automobile travelers. Bar Harbor features many never-before-published postcards from the collections of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, the Bar Harbor Historical Society, and the Penobscot Marine Museum.

Join the Author for the Following Events!

Sherman’s Books and Stationery

Saturday, August 13

6 – 8 p.m.

Available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at www.arcadiapublishing.com or (888)-313-2665

Arcadia Publishing is the leading publisher of local and regional history in the United States. Our mission is to make history accessible and meaningful through the publication of books on the heritage of America’s people and places. Have we done a book on your town? Visit http://www.arcadiapublishing.com.

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Bar Harborby Earle G. Shettleworth Jr.

Postcard History Series

Price: $21.99

128 pages/ softcover

Available: June 13, 2011

Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, civil war, events, headlines, historical societies, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston Christopher Glass, author of “Historic Maine Homes: 300 Years of Great Houses,” will be the featured speaker at the Thomaston Historical Society’s program Tuesday, Aug. 9 at the Knox Farmhouse, 80 Knox St. The evening will begin with…

Blueberry pancake breakfast to be held in Ellsworth The Blue Hill Historical Society will host a tour of historic Gettysburg Oct. 17-21 with departure locations in Bangor and Portland. The deposit deadline is Aug. 15 and the final payment deadline is Sept. 12…

Discovery of 2 books reveals Strong history The society recently received a grant from the Maine Historical Society’s Maine Memory Network (www.mainememory.net) that will allow the Strong team to purchase a high-quality scanner, computer and archiving materials. The Maine Memory Network was…

Strong groups awarded grant for history project The Strong Historical Society, the Strong Public Library, the High Peaks Alliance, and Strong School have partnered to begin a local history project, funded by a grant recently awarded by the Maine Memory Network…

History symposium scheduled for Aug. 4 in Machias Earl Shettleworth, of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, will be the keynote speaker at the History Symposium being sponsored by the Machias Historical Society. The theme of the symposium will be “Historic Preservation is Alice and Well in…

Author to sign mystery novel at Blueberry Festival Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will sign copies of her book, “The Wilding House,” on Friday and Saturday at the Wilton Historical Society during the Blueberry Festival. Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will…

Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture Everybody knows what wicker is, right? It’s that woven stuff that’s painted white. It may even be that stuff used in some chair seats. Or is that cane? Or rush, or reed? It turns out, Worthologist Fred Taylor explains, the word wicker in furniture terms actually refers to a process rather than a product. Follow along as Fred weaves the story of the evolution of wicker furniture, from ancient Egypt to the late Victorian period of the 1880s and 1890s to today. Read”Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture”

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Maine Historical Society

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit:

Practical Nursing in Waterville

This exhibit was created by staff at Kennebec Vally Community College, one of Maine Memory Network’s 210+ Contributing Partners.

Thousands of nurses were trained at the Maine School of Practical Nursing in Waterville from the 1950s through the 1980s. Read the story.

MHS News

September 1 Deadline for

Maine Memory Network Grants

Does your community have a story to share? Or a historical collection it would like to provide better access to? MHS is accepting proposals to help YOUR community share its history through Maine Memory Network:

  • Digitization grants (up to $750) are provided to help organizations and local teams use Maine Memory to digitize, catalog, and manage their collections online.
  • Online exhibit grants (up to $1250) are provided to help organizations and local teams share historical stories online. Topics might reflect any aspect of your town’s past, and range from the history of local businesses and industries to the community’s experience during a national event (e.g. the Civil War).

Encourage your favorite local organization to apply! Grants are accompanied by extensive training and support designed to help communities complete their projects and develop a broad range of skills. Detailed information.

From the Collections

MHS Online Catalog and Maine Memory Network recently updated!

If you are looking for a historical object from our collection, or want to browse through Maine artifacts, you can visit our online catalog PastPerfect. We recently added nearly 500 records and over 1,200 images to the catalog, which now contains almost 32,000 searchable records and 23,500 images for museum objects, photographs, manuscript letters, architectural drawings, and newspapers.

Newly added highlights: CMP collection objects, additional images from the Portland Press Herald glass plate negative collection, panoramic photographs, and additional Fogg collection autograph letters, including examples from artist Paul Akers and naturalist Louis Agassiz.

Additions to Maine Memory Network happen every day and we are now featuring 20,155 records! Contributors such as the L.C. Bates Museum and the Dyer Library Archives/ Saco Museum have been busy this summer adding new photos.

You can see what’s new to MMN and even subscribe to an RSS feed for new images and exhibits!

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Museums of Old York

Programs for adults

Thursday, August 4
Author Talk with David Remington at Remick Barn.
We are very pleased to offer an evening with David Remington, who will speak on his recently published book, Ashbel P. Fitch, Champion of Old New York. This biography of his great-grandfather provides a rare glimpse into the gilded age of New York City’s political world. Free for Members of Old York. $5 for nonmembers. Remick Barn, 7 p.m. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Saturday, August 6
Indian Encampment.
Well-known re-enactor, Ken Hamilton, presents a 17th-18th-century Indian Encampment during the day in front of the Remick Barn and Jefferds Tavern. This is a not-to-be-missed event with exciting activities for all age groups. Donations are appreciated. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Thursday, August 11
“History Challenge!” Game Show.
Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answer questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email rbowen@oldyork.org to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

Through Saturday August 13
Emerson House — 2011 Decorator Show House.
Our fundraiser continues with tours on Mon-Wed-Fri-Sat from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., and Sunday afternoons from 1-4 p.m. The house is closed to visitors on Tuesdays. Tickets are $20 at the door. We also have just a few tickets remaining for our final luncheon and designer discussion on August 10 at The York Harbor Reading Room. Tickets are $55 and include lunch, lecture and a full show house tour. To purchase tickets, please call (207) 363-4974. Visit our website for updates on the show house and other special events.

Sunday, August 14
Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed.
Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

Monday, August 15
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening. The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and Grand Opening of the Exhibit — Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer; Report on Library and Archives Project — Jessica Frankenfield, Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine, 5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m. Reception immediately following. Email development@oldyork.org for more information.

Fun for kids and families

Friday, August 5
Hearth Cooking Demonstration.
Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th -century receipts and techniques over the open fire. Watch and help as they prepare everything from fish and chicken to bread, pies and pudding using traditional methods such as Dutch ovens, iron kettles, and the bake oven. Stop in around 3:00 p.m. every Friday in July and August in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museums buildings. Email education@oldyork.org for more information.

Through Thursday, August 25
Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs.
Our summer camp programs for children build on the core curriculum of our school programs and provide children with learning experiences in a fun and supportive environment. Download a brochure and sign-up form for Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs for Children. Reservations are required for all programs. Programs run 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. and cost $23 ($20 members) unless otherwise indicated. For more information email education@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974.

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Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. I have made a few concessions to changes of the cover and some images, but the stories are all there. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Museums of Old York, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Navy in the Civil War

The Navy in the Civil War

Ellsworth Historical Society Meeting

The Ellsworth Historical Society meeting for July 11th, 2011 will be featuring a special guest speaker, Jack F. Battick, PHD, Professor Emeritus,University of Maine, who will be speaking on the topic of the Navy in the Civil War. The meeting will be held at the dining hall of the Meadowview Retirement Complex, 25 Tweedie Lane, at 7:00 pm, Monday evening July 11th.

Meetings of the Ellsworth Historical Society are open to the public and we encourage members and guests to attend this very special talk and remember the anniversary of the Civil War and its everlasting effect on our history.

For further information please contact the Ellsworth Historical Society at ellsworthhistory@yahoo.com or contact President Terri Cormier at 207-667-8235 or Vice President Linda Grindle at 207-667-5716. Membership is 20.00 per year and may be sent to The Ellsworth Historical Society PO Box 355Ellsworth, Me 04605 along with your contact information. Donations are also gratefully appreciated to help preserve our history.

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Unloved Antiques: Hummel Knockoffs Goebel Hummel figures—based on the original designs of innocent views of children created by Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel—have been popular since the late 1930s. Like most popular items, manufacturers are very quick to latch onto a new product and try and claim a piece of the market share. Original Hummels came flowing into North America after the Second World War, brought home by troops occupying Germany. But according to Worthologist Mike Wilcox, many “Hummel” figures are actually made in Japan. Mike has some tips on how to ID the genuine from the reproductions. Read”Unloved Antiques: Hummel Knockoffs”

Ask an Expert: What Did Abraham Lincoln’s Voice Sound Like? Civil War scholar Harold Holzer helps to decode what spectators heard when the 16th president spoke Read More »

Retired attorney-turned author to discuss early Maine law The author explains how the evolving law in Maine’s early years played out against the backdrop of old rules from the past running up against a society undergoing radical transformation brought on by momentous historical events, including the …

Waterford Historical Society announces events … he is coming to the North Waterford Church to share some of his Maine humor. Tickets are $15 in advance, $18 at the door, and will be available at Books ‘n Things in Norway and the Bridgton Bookstore and through members of the Historical Society…

CJ Pike: Willowbrook, Newfield Historical society to celebrate the Fourth The Newfield Historical Society and 19th Century Willowbrook Museum have an exciting Fourth of July celebration planned with music, firecracker ice cream, a children’s’ parade, and free admission on Monday, July 4. Families are invited to bring a…

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The Caleb Cushing Affair

Yes indeed, the Civil War came to the state of Maine, albeit briefly and with little fanfare from the national front. One of these instances was the attempt by a few Southern privateers, or CSN sailors if you’d rather call them that entered Portland Harbor with the intent of disrupting shipping by burning and otherwise destroying the waterfront of this hub of marine activity. What follows is but a brief portion of a longer piece I have written under the same title, which will be available in an upcoming book. In 2007 I posted this piece to the Wikipedia platform, but it is far from complete in this format. But the general details given here can tell most of the story, and you can go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Portland_Harbor to read that version with its changes. The accompanying image is of the Caleb Cushing on fire from Harpers Weekly magazine.

The Caleb Cushing Affair;

The Civil War Comes To Maine

The Federal Government during the Civil War had made many preparations to prevent attacks by the Confederate Army and Navy along the Southern sections of the Eastern Seaboard. Various installations of cannon and earthworks were built here and there for protection against any possible incursions. Construction of earthen works and establishment of batteries at strategic points were planned and some were begun.

The construction of Fort Popham, in Phippsburg, was just one such installation. Portland Harbor was considered an important location as well, and several projects were begun, and forts were constructed. But a lot of time was wasted on some of the proposed projects, and one of those was the construction of earthworks and battery at Portland Head in Cape Elizabeth.

Before the earthworks were commenced, a small detachment was assigned to the Head with the intention of placing a cannon there for firing warning shots should the rebel navy make it this far along the coast. The actual establishment was delayed for some reason, and the detachment was not posted until well after originally planned.

This was a serious mistake on the governments part as the following year, on June 26th, a Confederate raiding party entered the harbor at Portland, sailing right past the Portland Head Light. Two days prior to this a Confederate raider named the Tacony was being pursued by the union navy at sea.

To thwart the pursuers, the Confederates captured a Maine fishing vessel of the name Archer from out of Freeport. After transferring their supplies and cargo onto the Archer, the Confederates set fire to the Tacony hoping the Union navy would believe the ship was destroyed. The rebels then slipped into Portland Harbor under the guise of fishermen. Their plan was to slip back out of the harbor and try to destroy the commercial shipping capability of the area.

Sometime after midnight, the raiders slipped into the harbor itself and proceeded to the federal wharf. Having the advantage of surprise, the crew seized a cutter belonging to the Revenue service, the USRC Caleb Cushing, named after a Massachusetts Congressman . They made their escape and fled out to sea. News of the actions of the Confederates spread and the military was informed of the rebel intrusion. They had been observed by several persons while taking over the cutter, and public fury was fanned by the incident.

The seventeenth infantry was stationed at Fort Preble and 28 infantry men along with ten artillery men were dispatched to pursue the Southerners. Early in the morning, the soldiers went in pursuit after the sailing vessel in two small steamers.

Along with the soldiers went a six pound field piece and a 12 pound howitzer. The soldiers commandeered the steamer “Forest City” a cruise ship, and another steamer called the “Chesapeake”. All of the civilians on board were issued muskets to defend against the Rebels. The Forest City, being a faster boat, caught up to the Cushing and the Archer first. The Cushing opened fire upon the Forest City when it was within the two mile range of the Cushing. The Captain of the Forest City was afraid, and refused to pursue any further.

The Chesapeake, which had left port sometime after the Forest City, finally caught up and continued on towards the Cushing. The wind was beginning to blow against the rebel sailors and the steamers soon caught sight of the Cushing. Lt. Read, of the Confederate Navy ordered the Cushing torched.

The munitions exploded and destroyed the cutter after it was abandoned by his two dozen crewmen escaped in the lifeboats. They were subsequently captured and held as prisoners of war at Fort Preble. The Archer was also soon captured and all Rebels were returned to Portland. It was discovered that the Rebels were in possession of over one hundred thousand dollars in bonds. These were to be paid after a treaty for peace was ratified between the North and the south.

Public anger against the Southerners was high, and additional troops to safeguard the prisoners was requested. They had to be spirited out of Portland during the night to prevent a riot from breaking in July, when they were removed to Boston Harbor, where they were then held at Fort Warren.

This true story is just one of thousands of little stories that make Maine what it is today. History tends to place emphasis on the heroes, the newsmakers, the solitary leaders surrounded by the story. But history is much more than the big news flash of the moment. History is all of the little stories combined. Fact and fiction strive against one another and legends are born in the process. Because of this educators and history buffs tend to overlook the many little pieces that assemble into the puzzle of our past.

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Strathglass Park Sees the Light Again

More headlines from around Maine…

Please be sure to email your contributions and links to editor@touringmaineshistory.com and if you have an event to share, get it to me at least two weeks ahead of time.

It’s time for fiddleheads For most of his 71 years, Frank Buckley Sr. of Industry has gathered fiddlehead ferns in the spring to eat and to freeze for future meals. The abundance of the quickly maturing plants found around the Sandy River this time of year had him sitting in his car off the…

Strathglass Park restoration efforts light up Rumford For the first time in more than half a century, the historic Strathglass Park’s imposing granite gateway was lit up Monday night. That project is the culmination of a two-year effort by local nonprofit Strathglass Pa…

Documenting the Death of an Assassin In 1865, a single photograph was taken during the autopsy of John Wilkes Booth. Where is it now? Read More »

VIDEO: In the Footsteps of Lincoln’s Assassin »

Gen. Lee’s sword returning to Appomattox, Va.
It’s an enduring myth of the Civil War: Robert E. Lee surrendered his sword to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox, and his Union counterpart refused the traditional gesture of surrender. “Lee never offered it, and Grant never asked for it,” said Patrick Schroeder, historian at Appomattox Courthouse National Historical Park. In an historical twist, though, Lee’s French-made ceremonial sword is returning to Appomattox 146 years later, leaving the Richmond museum where it has been displayed for nearly a century…

200-year-old library book returned to Camden The stamp inside a book published in 1790 shows that it was the property of the “Federal Society Library in Cambden,in the County of Lincoln,” the first library established in Camden. The worn

History of Aldermere Farm On Tuesday, May 17 at 7 pm at the new Hope Corner Firehouse, Hope Historical Society’s monthly meeting will feature a talk on the history of Aldermere Farm. The Chatfield’s Aldermere farm on Russell Avenue in Rockport is known to most as the

Forgotten Maine murals focus of new book The book explores the history of Maine murals as seen through the work of Rufus a firm that specializes in the documentation of historical collections.

History trail shows Freeport has more than shops in store The Freeport Historical Society will unveil the Freeport Heritage Trail at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Old First Parish Meetinghouse and Burial Ground at Lower Main Street and Meetinghouse Road. Consisting of 17 interpretive signs and related podcasts, the trail will direct people to significant spots in Freeport history. The goal is to reinforce the town’s identity among residents and visitors alike, said Christina White, historical society director…

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Antique Appraisals & the Civil War in the News

Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions about Appraisals
Appraisers are often asked questions about how the appraisal process works and whether an appraisal is even needed. Worthologist Liz Holderman rounds up the most frequently asked questions (FAQs) and gives some quick and easy answers, including how an appraiser knows what your collection is worth, why appraisers need to know why you want an appraisal, whether your baseball-card collection is covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy and how the Internet changed the value of collectibles. See if your questions are answered here, and if not, ask away in the comments section. Liz will be glad to reply.Read “Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions about Appraisals”

Who fired first Civil War shot? A dispute in Fla.

A raid 150 years ago by Confederate sympathizers on a Union fort at what is now Pensacola Naval Air Station was likely little more than an ill-planned and drunken misadventure, perhaps ended by one soldier’s warning shot — and a blank one, at that. But don’t tell Pensacola residents that the Jan. 8, 1861, skirmish meant nothing — the event is the stuff of legend in this military town. Some even claim the clash was the Civil War’s first, three months before the battle on April 12, 1861, at South Carolina’s Fort Sumter, which is widely recognized as the start of the war. Dale Cox, the unofficial historian for the Florida Panhandle chapter of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, wrote on his blog that he considers the Pensacola shot the first of the Civil War, saying in an interview that it marked the first time federal troops fired toward Confederate agitators….

How We’ve Commemorated the Civil War

Take a look back at how Americans have remembered the civil war during significant anniversaries of the past… Read More »
also read;
The Civil War at 150 »

Poll: 4 in 10 Southerners Still Side With Confederacy

A century and a half after the opening shots of the U.S. Civil War, nearly four in 10 Southerners say they still sympathize with the Confederacy. That’s according to a new CNN poll released on the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, when Union soldiers raised a U.S. flag over Fort Sumter in South Carolina and the opening shots of the war rang out. The poll’s results reveal that the war that divided the nation for four years still divides American public opinion today. In the South, 38 percent of respondents said they sympathize with the Confederacy, which lost the bloody war. More than 600,000 American soldiers on both sides were killed. Overall, the number from all geographic areas who said they still side with the South is less than a quarter….

How Civil War Photography Changed War

Civil War photographers completely changed popular perceptions of modern warfare. We’ve all seen photographs of the Civil War: black-and-white images of bearded Union generals or mustachioed Confederate colonels posing to one side of the camera, dead bodies stacked on the battlefield or common soldiers around a camp tent. Looking back 150 years to the start of the Civil War this month, what impact did photography have on the war? On the people who lived during the time? What do these images tell us today about the soldiers and their families?

Historic Structures at Fort Davis National Historic Site Threatened by Major Wildfires

We’ve grown accustomed to media coverage of property threatened by raging wildfires in California, but… West Texas? Large fires that raced across the high desert last weekend caused major damage in the small town of Fort Davis. Thus far, the key historic structures at Fort Davis National Historic Site have escaped, but it’s been a close call, and fires continue to burn in the vicinity. Fort Davis National Historic Site preserves perhaps the best example of an Indian Wars’ frontier military post in the Southwest, and the rugged terrain adds to the fort’s appeal for modern-day visitors. That terrain, combined with severe drought and fierce winds, contributed to some of the worst fires in Texas history in recent days. Last weekend, the Rock House Fire burned over 108,000 acres in the region, including more than 106 acres of pinion-juniper, brush and grass in the higher elevation area of Fort Davis National Historic Site. The area affected is on the west side of the park, and includes land just acquired by the NPS in January….

Artifacts And Archives From Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Heading South For Safekeeping

Sometime this summer a truck, or trucks, loaded with artifacts and papers at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in Montana, will slowly pull away from the monument and set out on a 20-or-so-hour drive south. When the truck, or trucks, pull into the National Park Service’s Western Archaeological and Conservation Center in Tucscon, Arizona, workers will unload roughly 150,000 artifacts and archives tied in some fashion to the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry’s darkest days in June 1876…

Reenactments Highlight Fort Sumter Battle Anniversary Commemoration

One hundred and fifty years ago this Tuesday, April 12, the first salvos of the Civil War were launched when Confederate forces began a 34-hour bombardment that ended with the surrender of Fort Sumter. “The firing upon that fort will inaugurate a civil war greater than any the world has yet seen,” declared Robert Toombs, Confederate secretary of state, not long before the conflict began. Despite the lack of fatalities (except for two that a surrender ceremony accident produced), the siege on the Union fort on Charleston Harbor in South Carolina commenced

4 ways we’re still fighting the Civil War

He stood 5-foot-8 and weighed 145 pounds. His face was gaunt and sunburned. Ticks, fleas and lice covered his body. Before battle, his lips would quiver and his body went numb. When the shooting started, some of his comrades burst into maniacal laughter. Others bit the throat and ears of their enemy. And some were shattered by shells so powerful that tufts of their hair stuck to rocks and trees. Take a tour of a Civil War battlefield today, and it’s difficult to connect the terrifying experience of an average Civil War soldier — described above from various historical accounts — with the tranquil historic sites where we now snap pictures today. But you don’t have to tour a battlefield to understand the Civil War. Look at today’s headlines. As the nation commemorates the 150th anniversary of its deadliest war this week, some historians say we’re still fighting over some of the same issues that fueled the Civil War.

Maine’s historic churches presentation May 4

Union Historical Society will present a program on “Maine’s Historic Churches” on Wednesday May 4 at 7:30 pm in the Old Town House, Town House Road, Union. Christi A. Mitchell, architectural historian with the Maine Historic Preservation …

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Sumter 150 Years Ago

150 years ago today, as I write this, the ‘War between the State’s began as Rebel forces began the unprovoked bombardment of Fort Sumter. Following is a selection of press releases and articles concerning this fateful day;(image is an exterior view of Sumter taken sometime after the bombardment, LOC image)

April 10.—The floating battery, finished, mounted, and manned at Charleston, was taken out of the dock last evening, and anchored in the cove, near Sullivan’s Island.

The people are not excited, but there is a fixed determination to meet the issue. The Convention has just adjourned, subject to the call of the president. Before adjourning, it passed resolutions approving the conduct of General Twiggs in resigning his commission and turning over the public property under his control to the authorities.

Governor Pickens was in secret session with the Convention. About 1,000 troops were sent to the fortifications to-day; 1,800 more go down to-morrow.

Messrs. “Wigfall, Chesnut, Means, Manning, McGowan, and Boyleston, have received appointments in General Beauregard’s staff. A large number of the members of tho Convention, after adjournment, volunteered as privates. About 7,000 troops are now at the fortifications. The beginning of the end is coming to a final closing. Fort Sumter will be attacked without waiting for the fleet. Everything is prepared against a land attack. The enthusiasm is intense, and the eagerness for the conflict, if it must come, unbounded.—JV”. Y. Day Boon.

—The officers of the District of Columbia militia were ordered to meet at 10 o’clock AM in consequence of information relative to a contemplated movement for the seizure of the city of Washington by the secessionists under Ben McCullough. Orders were issued for the militia to assemble at their armories.

Seven militia companies reported to General Scott, and between six and eight hundred of them volunteered for any service in which the President might desire them to act.—Times, April 11.

April 11.—The steamship Coatzacoalcos arrived at New York this morning, bringing home the Federal troops who were left in Texas without a commander, after the treason of General Twiggs.

—The Government at Washington is acting on positive information in taking all possible precautionary measures for the defense of, and the maintenance of peace at, that point.

A company of military were marched inside the capitol to-night, and a picket of guards is stationed on each of the roads leading into the city. This was done on no new information, but is among the signs of the revolution. A military company has not been within the walls of the capitol before since the war of 1812.

The oath of fidelity was administered to several companies of volunteers today. — World, April 12.

—Unusual activity now prevails in military circles in Pennsylvania. New companies are forming, and the old organizations are drilling frequently. The prospect of active service in the event of the breaking out of actual hostilities in the South, is exciting much discussion among the volunteer companies, and it is understood that several have already tendered their services to the Secretary of War, in case the Government should need their aid. It is also understood that in the event of an attack on the Government, the latter will make an early call upon Pennsylvania for men. Our volunteers labor under great disadvantages in respect to arras, and in a case of emergency many more men would be forthcoming than there are arms to place in their hands. —Phila. Press.

—This morning the Commissioners of the Confederate States left Washington. They are satisfied that no recognition of the Southern Confederacy will ever take place under the administration of President Lincoln. In their final communication they reflect severely on the Administration, taking the ground they have exhausted every resource for a peaceful solution of the existing difficulties, and that if civil war results, on the head of the Federal Government will rest the responsibility. They charge the Administration with gross perfidy, insisting that under the shelter of the pretext and assertion that Fort Sumter was to be evacuated, an immense armada has been dispatched to provision and reinforce that fort. They repeat they had almost daily indirect assurances from the Administration that Fort Sumter was positively to be abandoned, and that all the Government’s efforts were to be directed toward peace. The commissioners allege that the Government at Montgomery was earnestly desirous of peace; and that, in accordance with its instructions, as well as their own feelings, they left no means unexhausted to secure that much-desired end; but all their efforts having failed, they were now forced to return to an outraged people with the object of their mission unaccomplished; and they express the firm conviction that war is inevitable.—(Doc. 51.)— World, April 12.

—at 2 P. M. Colonel Chesnut and Major Lee, aids to General Beauregard, conveyed to Fort Sumter the demand that Major Anderson should evacuate that fort. Major Anderson replied at 6 P. M. that his “sense of honor and his obligations to his Government would prevent his compliance” with the demand. He informed the gentlemen verbally that he would be “starved out in a few days.”

It was stated that there were at this time 7,000 men around Fort Sumter under arms, and 140 pieces of ordnance of heavy caliber in position and ready for use.—Charleston Mercury.

April 12.—At 1 A. M. a second deputation from General Beauregard conveyed to Fort Sumter the message that if Major Anderson would name the time when he would evacuate, and would agree not to fire in the mean time upon the batteries unless they fired upon him, no fire would be opened upon Fort Sumter. To this Major Anderson replied that he would evacuate at noon on the 15th, if not previously otherwise ordered, or not supplied, and that he would not in the mean time open his fire unless compelled by some hostile act against his fort or the flag of his Government. At 3.30 A. M. the officers who received this answer notified Major Anderson that the batteries under command of General Beauregard would open on Fort Sumter in one hour, and immediately left.

The sentinels in Sumter were then ordered from the parapets, the posterns were closed, and the men ordered not to leave the bombproofs until summoned by the drum.

At 4.30 A. M fire was opened upon Fort Sumter from Fort Moultrie, and soon after from the batteries on Mount Pleasant, Cummings’ Point, and the floating battery; in all 17 mortars and 30 large guns for shot—mostly Columbiads. Meantime the garrison of Sumter took breakfast quietly at their regular hour, were then divided into three reliefs, each of which was to work the guns for four hours; and the fire of Sumter was opened at 7 A. M. from the lower tier of guns, upon Fort Moultrie, the iron battery on Cummings’ Point, two batteries on Sullivan’s Island, and the floating battery simultaneously. “When the first relief went to work, the enthusiasm of the men was so great that the second and third reliefs could not be kept from the guns.

As the fire of the enemy became warm, it was found that there was no portion of the fort not exposed to the fire of mortars. Shells from every direction burst against the various walls. Cartridges soon run out; there were no cartridge bags, and men were set to make them out of shirts. There was no instrument to weigh powder, and this, with the absence of breech-sides and other implements necessary to point guns, rendered an accurate fire impossible.

Fire broke out in the barracks three times, and was extinguished. Meals were served at the guns. At C P. M. the fire from Sumter ceased. Fire was kept up from the enemy’s batteries all night, at intervals of twenty minutes.—Tribune, Times, and Herald, April 13, 14, 15.

April 13.—Fire from the enemy’s batteries was resumed at daylight and from Fort Sumter at 7 A. M. At about 8 the officers’ quarters in Sumter took fire from a shell, and the work at the guns was necessarily somewhat slackened, as nearly all the men were taken away to extinguish the flames. Shells from Moultrie and Morris’ Island fell now faster than ever. Dense volumes of smoke still poured out of the barracks at 9, when the men were again sent to the guns. At 10 o’clock the halyards on the flag-staff were cut by a shell, and the flag ran down a little and stuck, so that it appeared to be displayed at half-mast. Several ships, one a large steamer, were in the offing at 10.30, and shots were fired at them from Morris’ Island and Fort Moultrie. About 11 o’clock the fire in the barracks again burst forth fiercely. Three piles of hand-grenades and shells, placed ready for use, became heated by it and exploded at intervals. The day was oppressively warm, and the heat of the fire added, made the atmosphere of the fort almost insufferable. At 12 the whole roof of the barracks was in flames and soon after men were set to work to take the powder out of the magazine, lest the heat should reach and explode it there. Ninety barrels were rolled out and the doors closed. The fire of Fort Sumter was now almost entirely relinquished, though from the other forts it was rather increased. Cartridges were nearly all gone, and owing to the flying sparks no more could be made. Smoke from the fire was blown into the fort so thickly that the men could not see one another. As the fire in the barracks spread from the officers’ to the men’s quarters, it became necessary to throw overboard the powder that had been taken from the magazines. All was thrown over but three barrels, which were wrapped around with wet cloths and left. From these the garrison was soon separated by the fire, and now only the cartridges in the guns were left. These were fired now and then to indicate that the fort was not silenced. Thus in truth the work was held while there was a cartridge to fire or powder enough accessible to make one. The flagstaff, which had been hit nine times, was cut at about 1, and the flag was then nailed to the cut piece, and so raised upon the ramparts. At this time both officers and men were compelled to lay flat upon their faces in the casemates, and hold wet cloths to their mouths to escape suffocation. Soon after Ex-Senator “Wigfall came to the fort with a flag of truce, which he wished held up while he spoke; but the batteries did not respect it. He, however, represented himself as an aid of General Beauregard, and agreed for the evacuation of Fort Sumter. It was afterward learned that he had spoken falsely, and had no authority whatever from General Beauregard.

At 12.55 P. M. the flag of Fort Sumter was drawn down, and the fort was surrendered soon after upon honorable terms; the garrison to carry away the flag of the fort, and all company arms and property, and all private property; and all proper facilities to be afforded for their removal to any post in the United States the commander might elect.

No men were hurt in Sumter by the fire of the enemy. It is reported by the secessionists that no men were either killed or wounded upon their side.

A boat from the United States squadron outside, with a flag of truce, arrived at Morris’ Island, with a request to be allowed to come and take Major Anderson and his forces. — {Doc. 52.)—Tribune, Times, Herald, and World.

—A Dispatch from Montgomery, Ala., says that Fort Pickens was reinforced last night. — {Doc. 53.)

—To-day the President expelled from the Federal army, for refusing to act on a particular service, Captain William B. St. Johns, of the Third Infantry, and First Lieutenant Abner Smead, of the First Artillery.

—The Legislature of Pennsylvania passed the war bill without amendment last evening. Previous to its passage, the news of the bombardment of Fort Sumter was announced, and produced a profound sensation. The bill appropriates five hundred thousand dollars for the purpose of arming and equipping the militia; authorizes a temporary loan; provides for the appointment of an Adjutant-General, Commissary-General, and Quartermaster-General, who, with tho Governor, aro to have power to carry the act into effect. —Philadelphia Enquirer

—To-day the Virginia Commissioners were formally received by the President at Washington, when they presented the resolutions under which they were appointed.—{Doc. 54.)

—The attack upon Fort Sumter, and its surrender, instead of depressing, fires and animates all patriotio hearts. One deep, strong, overpowering sentiment now sweeps over the whole community—a sentiment of determined, devoted, active loyalty. The day for the toleration of treason—treason to the Constitution in defiance to the laws that we have made!—has gone by. The people have discovered that what they deemed almost impossible has actually come to pass, and that the rebels are determined to break up this Government, if they can do it. With all such purposes they are determined to make an end as speedily as may be.—{Doe. bo.)—Times, April 15.

—Bishop Lynch, Eoman Catholic, at Charleston, S. 0. celebrated the bloodless victory of Fort Sumter with a Te Deum and congratulatory address. In all the churches allusions were made to the subject.

The Episcopal Bishop, wholly blind and feeble, said it was his strong persuasion, strengthened by travel through every section of South Carolina that the movement in which the people were engaged was begun by them in the deepest conviction of duty to God; and God had signally blessed their dependence on him. If there is a war, it will be purely a war of self defense.—Tribune, April 16.

—General Beauregard, in general orders to-day, congratulates “the troops under his command on the brilliant success which has crowned their gallantry, by the reduction of the stronghold in the harbor of Charleston.”— {Doc. 56.)

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