Salt andPines project

Rusticating in Bygone Maine

Maine has a long history as being a place to get away to, and in some cases, we have surpassed the success of many better known vacation spots. During the latter 1800’s into the early 1900’s rusticating in Maine was in vogue. People came from all over the world to relax in our rustic environment, and as a result, several world class tourist spots were developed.

One of them, the Poland Spring Inn, as shown in this postcard of mine boasted of its miraculous spring water. The water was so popular it was bottled for distribution in the old familiar green bottles with the green labeling.

Most of the older mega hotels, if you want to call them that have disappeared, but you can still find remnants of many by way of old advertising, postcards and various publications describing their offerings. Things have changed over the course of the years, so we now see a differing sort of entertainment to keep visitors happy.

It used to be common to find people boating, or taking hikes through the woods or along a shoreline, enjoying the sights to be found in the world of nature. Those same sights are still there, however, and can be found again by those of an adventurous nature.

Another world famous resort was the Kineo House, which could be found on Moosehead Lake in the Greenville area. This ca. 1850 picture to the right shows the hotel before its latter additions. The Kineo House was a grand destination for those sportsmen who wanted to get back into the big woods for fishing and hunting, and there are many stories of the successful hunts that could be had with the right guide. Fishermen were able to catch overflowing strings of various species that could be found not only in Moosehead Lake itself, but from the many streams and brooks running into the lake.

Along the coastline, dozens of old hotels lined the beaches, and southern Maine offered miles of sandy beaches for the travelers enjoyment. At one time, Old Orchard Beach recorded more visitors than the famed beaches of Atlantic City in New Jersey, and surpassed by far the then newly marketed California shoreline.

Bar Harbor has become a locale enticing the rich and famous from around the world, and many of the one time visitors have become seasonal residents here in Maine, all due to our climate and abundant resources. In those days, coming to Maine for a vacation was referred to as ‘rusticating’. It was a combination of roughing it in the woods while living elegantly, so to speak.

It amazes me today to read of the accoutrements carried into the woods by folks in those days, setting up a rough camp with all the comforts of home. It makes me wonder at times where all the people came from to tote all of the equipment into the woods. Hotels were generally advertised as having all of the amenities one could wish for on their vacation, some even boasting of hot baths.

Classy restaurants could be found in most of the better hotels, with some of them gaining quite a reputation for their culinary flare and style. No matter how you slice the pie, Maine was the place to go when you wanted to get away. In spite of the changing times, you can still get away in Maine today, whether you want to get out into the deep woods, or relax by the seaside in a comfortable resort. And while you’re visiting, there are many museums and historical societies you see to enhance your vacation if you are indeed a history buff.

We are coming into a new year, and with every new year comes a new set of hoops to jump through. It is no different for these organizations, and every one of them, from the Maine State Historical Society down to the smallest village historical society you can find, needs your help to survive. Please visit them, and see if you can help them out by either a donation of cash, or maybe even volunteering some time in this new year. You might be surprised at what you can learn about our past!

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Categories: historical societies, Maine, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Norlands’ community, others mourn loss of leader

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Historian to give lectures on Maine Irish
This lecture will be held at the Androscoggin Historical Society. On September 22, he will discuss the St. Joseph’s and St. Patrick’s parishes, and in particular the art, architecture and history behind these two distinctly Irish strongholds…

Historic play about Hessians to be performed in Orono
The play is being produced in Castine in cooperation with the Castine Historical Society and Maine Maritime Academy. It is supported by a grant from the Maine Humanities Council. This will be the first time the play has been produced in English…

New Book Explores Maine’s Earliest Shipbuilding Tradition
The book can be found at Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, Maine Historical Society in Portland, BlueJacket Shipcrafters in Searsport, and Bowdoin College bookstore. John W. Bradford has a life-long interest in early Maine history and the Popham Colony in…

Historical Society’s calendars available
Send to: Dead River Area Historical Society, PO Box 15, Stratton, Maine 04982. There are many pictorial calendars left from previous years for sale at $2.50 each. Cook books may also be ordered from the same address, $6 each or two for $10…

Contractors discover 168-year-old tombstones during dig in Lincoln

LINCOLN, Maine — Old records, history texts and some forensic deduction helped town officials solve a 168-year-old mystery that was literally unearthed Monday on School Street and slightly delayed a $416,000 construction project. Subcontractors working for the Lincoln Water District replacing 87-year-old water lines behind Steaks ‘N Stuff discovered the…

Massacre site in Utah becomes national landmark

The southern Utah site of a pioneer-era wagon train massacre is being dedicated as a national historic landmark. The 760-acre Mountain Meadows Massacre site becomes a monument on Sunday. It marks the spot where 120 members of an Arkansas wagon train were shot and killed by a Mormon militia on Sept. 11, 1857. The Baker-Fancher wagon train was on a stop-over in the meadows on their way to California when it was attacked…

Winds fan flames that destroy landmark, other buildings in Grand Isle

GRAND ISLE, Maine — A huge fire, fanned by brisk winds, destroyed a local 90-year-old landmark and three other buildings Sunday afternoon and evening despite the efforts of more than 70 firefighters from 11 fire departments in northern Maine and Canada. Mike True, owner of Lille Antiques, said Monday that…

Norlands’ community, others mourn loss of leader

LIVERMORE — Members of the Washburn-Norlands History Center community and beyond are mourning the loss of acting Director Nancey Drinkwine, who died unexpectedly on Friday. Drinkwine, 63, of Hartford was at the Center when she had a heart attack, said her husband, Garnett Rutherford,…

The public is invited to a celebration of her life at 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 18, in the Meeting House at Norlands at 290 Norlands Road in Livermore.

~~~

From Museums of Old York:

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Meet at the Highland Farm Preserve parking lot, which is located 2.9 miles from the intersection of Rtes. 91 and1 in York. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

19 “The Country Heer is Plentiful” exhibit of Trade, Religion and Warfare and Southern Maine 1631-1745 resumes in the upstairs gallery at The Parsons Center during regular museum hours.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Click here to view the scrumptious menu on our website. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany the hearth-cooked meal. Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Seating is limited to twenty and reservations are required. Please email Richard Bowen or call (207) 363-4974 to make your reservation by September 21.

26 Needle Wizards.Every Monday morning starting the 26th of September. Join our Needle Wizards as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information email Cindi at registrar@oldyork.org.

29 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

~~~

From the Maine Historical Society:

Mark Your Calendar for Fall Programs

Tuesday, October 4, 12pm

Book Talk:Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Friday, October 7, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk: Fashion Exhibits

Thursday, October 13, 7pm

Book Talk: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light

Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm

Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Wednesday, October 26, 7pm

Book Talk: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Presenter: Colin Woodard, Author

Thursday, November 10, 7pm

In Partnership with the Colonial Dames in Maine
Tales from an Art Detective: Tracing Nazi-era Provenance at the MFA

Presenter: Victoria Reed, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

~~~

The Old Orchard House

Maine has long been known or at least advertised as “Vacationland,” and with good reason. There once was a time when Maine’s picturesque coastline and rugged interior proved to be a haven for what we call “rusticators” today, as millions of people flocked to our shores and woodlands in search of rest, relaxation, and a bit of adventure. Old Orchard Beach was called by some the queen of the eastern coast, and was one of the most heavily visited coastal sites in America, surpassing even the famed beaches of California and Florida, even.

The Old Orchard house was one of the premier establishments of this coastal resort town in its day, boasting of a capacity of 500 guests, with amenities in abundance to be had by all.

Here are a couple of selections from an upcoming volume on vacationing in Maine’s bygone days I am working on;

1: Old Orchard— This is one of Maine’s most famous summer resorts and Old Orchard Beach is the most important Maine beach, and one of the best in the country. The Boston and Maine Railroad passes in close proximity to it, and its accessibility causes it to be visited by vast numbers of people. It has a number of large and several smaller hotels which are well patronized during the summer months. It was formerly a part of Saco, but it is now incorporated as a town. Its patronage is largely by persons residing outside of the State. The Old Orchard House is the largest among its hotels.

2: Old Orchard follows. This is the most noted place on the Maine Coast, as a resort, except perhaps Mount Desert. It is twelve miles south of Portland and ninety-six miles from Boston. The beach of this region is as fine as any on the New England coast. It stretches a distance of twelve miles, from Scarborough River to Saco River. It takes its name from an old apple orchard, in the midst of which the first hotel was erected.

This place is reached by the Boston and Maine Railroad, which runs between the hotels and the sea-shore. It may also be reached from the Eastern Railroad, from the Saco depot, but this is some miles distant by stage.

There are numerous hotels here, with accommodations for from 50 to 500 guests each. Some of the principal of these are the Belmont, Blanchard, Central, Piske, Gorham, Irving, Lawrence, Ocean, Old Orchard House, Pleasant House, Sea Shore and St. Cloud. The largest of these is the Old Orchard House, which has a capacity of 500 guests. Next is the Ocean, which will accommodate 400. The Blanchard and Sea Shore have room for 200 each. The Fiske and Central, Lawrence and St. Cloud have room for 150 each; the Gorham for 100. The capacity of the others is under 100. The charges at the Old Orchard are the highest; being from $3.00 to $3.50 per day, and from $10.00 to $21.00 per week. The Ocean House charges $2.00 to $3.00 per day, and $10.00 to $17.50 per week. The charges at the other houses vary, from $1.00 to $2.50 a day, and from $7.00 to $25.00 per week.

Between Old Orchard and Biddeford Pool is Ferry Beach. Here is a very good hotel called the Bay View House, accommodating 100 guests, and charging from $7.00 to $14.00 per week. It is best reached from Saco.

~~~

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, events, headlines, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Museums of Old York, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ponce’s Landing, Long Island

Headlines and articles on Maine history news

Historic Town House to hold unveiling ceremony in Dixmont

DIXMONT, Maine — An unveiling ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, at the historic Dixmont Town House, 702 Western Avenue in Dixmont. A historic marker recently was provided and installed at the Dixmont Town House by Central Maine Power Co. The Dixmont Historical Society invites the public to attend the ceremonies. Refreshments will be served. The Town House will be open to view the work that has been done to save the historic building, and members of the Historical Society Committee will be on hand to discuss future plans. For more information, call 234-2271.

Chamberlain Days kicks off Thursday
BRUNSWICK — The Pejepscot Historical Society will sponsor Chamberlain Days, a series of lectures, workshops, and other Civil War related programs for the general public. Programming begins at 7 pm Thursday in the Morrell Meeting Room at Curtis…

Holy History! Churches share stories
The editors were made up of people who had writing skills as well as a knowledge of local history, said historical society Member Sallie Huot, who was one of the editors, as well as the writer of the chapter on the history of Trinity Episcopal Church…

Work of 1800s itinerant artist focus of talk, tours
These are the pastoral views painted on the walls of local historic homes by artist Rufus Porter. History buffs and art admirers attended the Aug. 6 Townsend Historical Society “Porter Landscape School Murals: a Talk and Tour,” led by Rufus Porter…

Historic Orono mill torn asunder as town makes way for condo project

ORONO, Maine — When an excavator’s grapple peeled part of the roof off the old Webster Mill on Monday evening, the crowd that had gathered to watch the demolition of the more than 130-year-old building let out a cheer. The cheers grew louder when the grapple came down on the…

‘Sacred ground’ of Popham settlement commands archaeologist’s attention

PHIPPSBURG, Maine — Dr. Jeffrey Brain sat on a boulder at the edge of a nondescript field near the mouth of the Kennebec River, enjoying the view. Fishing boats puttered by in the swirling currents, cutting through blazes of sunshine cast up by the rippling water. A clam harvester donning…

An island prison: Rugged St. Croix Island brought ghastly death to early settlers

Editor’s Note: This is the first of three stories examining Maine’s historic role in the settling of the New World. The other two parts will run Monday and Tuesday. ROBBINSTON, Maine — When French settlers set out to claim parts of the New World at the turn of the 17th…

States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards
Looking for a fun collection that won’t break the bank or something for your children to collect? Worthologist Bonnie Wilpon says that one collection that’s easy to start while on vacation is state humor postcards, which can be found in gas stations, restaurants, hotels, airports and local shops, in addition to postcard shows and on online collecting sites for when you get back home. While every state likes to poke fun at itself and its residents, there are some jokes that transcend state boarders: Can you guess what “bird” is claimed by 30 different states as their “official” winged denizen? Bonnie will show you some examples. Read “States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards”

‘Clipperways’ to be razed

The 113-year-old home has been called ‘the jewel of Prouts Neck.’ The new owner will build another house…

Museum News:

Museums of Old York

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

August

19, 26 Hearth Cooking Demonstrations. Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th-century recipes and techniques over the open fire. Stop in Fridays around 3:00 p.m. to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museum buildings.

25 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of areas outside the village proper. Email Richard Bowen for more information.
23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany their hearth-cooked meal.Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Reservations required. Email Richard Bowen for more information.

29 History Brought to Life. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates. See above for more info.

October

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. Thursday, October 6, 7 p.m. Remick Barn.
15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Remick Barn Visitors Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the Remick Barn at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween. For the third year in a row, Old York invites you to meet the ghosts of the long-departed residents of the local area. Look for details in September. Saturday, October 29, 6 – 8 p.m.

Maine Historical Society


Monday-Friday, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: Innocent Interlude, Scenes of Life in Portland, Maine 1940-41

Take a tour of Portland in the early 1940s through this remarkable series of color films made by city officials. (60 minutes) More info

Wednesday, August 24, 11am

Family Tour of the Wadsworth-Longfellow House More info

Thursday, August 25, 11am

The Longfellow Trail: An Urban Expedition: Guided walking tour through downtown Portland More info

Saturday, August 27, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: The Dave Astor Show Visits Jordan’s Meats

In this episode recorded in 1962 (the only episode of the Dave Astor Show that still exists), Dave and his students celebrate the opening of the new Jordan’s Meats plant in Portland with song, dance, and lots of fun. (60 minutes) More info

Penobscot marine Museum

Greetings From Hampden: Selections from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Collection: Slide talk by Kevin Johnson, Photo Archivist. Sponsored by Hampden Historical Society. At Kinsley House, 83 Main Rd., So. Hampden, ME. For more information: hampdenmaine.com or 207-862-2027, Aug. 22, 7 p.m.

Historic Photos of Jonesport: Kevin Johnson will show historic images of Jonesport and environs from the Eastern Illustrating Collection. At Peabody Memorial Library, 162 Main Street, Jonesport, ME. For more information: 207-497-5644. Aug. 25, 7 p.m.

Shadowbox Workshop: Learn how to make dioramas inspired by the work of Anne-Emmanuelle Marpeau. At the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine. To register, contact Susan Henkel: 207-548-2529 ext.202. Sept. 17, 9 a.m.

And We’ll Be Exhibiting at:

Belfast Harbor Fest, Aug. 20

Camden Windjammer Festival, Sept. 2-4

Common Ground Fair, Sept. 23-25

~~~

Today’s postcard pick shows both Ponce’s and Trefethen’s Landing on Long Island, just outside Portland Harbor. Roberta Gomez Ricker has a story called At the Base of Ponce’s Landing in our new book, Salt & Pines, available through your local bookseller or online at History Press. It is a fine story that describes not only some of the hardships island living presents, but some of the joys life on one of Maine’s islands can bring as well. Islanders are a special kind of people, and this story will help at least one tale live on when all else has been forgotten. You may have caught the piece on the book in this past Sunday’s Portland Press’ Audience section, but if not head on over and check it out here. Volume two is just about ready to go, with just some minor editing and image placements remaining, and I’m currently accepting submissions for volume three. If you’d like to learn more, email your questions to me at editor@remembermemedia.com

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston Christopher Glass, author of “Historic Maine Homes: 300 Years of Great Houses,” will be the featured speaker at the Thomaston Historical Society’s program Tuesday, Aug. 9 at the Knox Farmhouse, 80 Knox St. The evening will begin with…

Blueberry pancake breakfast to be held in Ellsworth The Blue Hill Historical Society will host a tour of historic Gettysburg Oct. 17-21 with departure locations in Bangor and Portland. The deposit deadline is Aug. 15 and the final payment deadline is Sept. 12…

Discovery of 2 books reveals Strong history The society recently received a grant from the Maine Historical Society’s Maine Memory Network (www.mainememory.net) that will allow the Strong team to purchase a high-quality scanner, computer and archiving materials. The Maine Memory Network was…

Strong groups awarded grant for history project The Strong Historical Society, the Strong Public Library, the High Peaks Alliance, and Strong School have partnered to begin a local history project, funded by a grant recently awarded by the Maine Memory Network…

History symposium scheduled for Aug. 4 in Machias Earl Shettleworth, of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, will be the keynote speaker at the History Symposium being sponsored by the Machias Historical Society. The theme of the symposium will be “Historic Preservation is Alice and Well in…

Author to sign mystery novel at Blueberry Festival Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will sign copies of her book, “The Wilding House,” on Friday and Saturday at the Wilton Historical Society during the Blueberry Festival. Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will…

Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture Everybody knows what wicker is, right? It’s that woven stuff that’s painted white. It may even be that stuff used in some chair seats. Or is that cane? Or rush, or reed? It turns out, Worthologist Fred Taylor explains, the word wicker in furniture terms actually refers to a process rather than a product. Follow along as Fred weaves the story of the evolution of wicker furniture, from ancient Egypt to the late Victorian period of the 1880s and 1890s to today. Read”Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture”

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Maine Historical Society

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit:

Practical Nursing in Waterville

This exhibit was created by staff at Kennebec Vally Community College, one of Maine Memory Network’s 210+ Contributing Partners.

Thousands of nurses were trained at the Maine School of Practical Nursing in Waterville from the 1950s through the 1980s. Read the story.

MHS News

September 1 Deadline for

Maine Memory Network Grants

Does your community have a story to share? Or a historical collection it would like to provide better access to? MHS is accepting proposals to help YOUR community share its history through Maine Memory Network:

  • Digitization grants (up to $750) are provided to help organizations and local teams use Maine Memory to digitize, catalog, and manage their collections online.
  • Online exhibit grants (up to $1250) are provided to help organizations and local teams share historical stories online. Topics might reflect any aspect of your town’s past, and range from the history of local businesses and industries to the community’s experience during a national event (e.g. the Civil War).

Encourage your favorite local organization to apply! Grants are accompanied by extensive training and support designed to help communities complete their projects and develop a broad range of skills. Detailed information.

From the Collections

MHS Online Catalog and Maine Memory Network recently updated!

If you are looking for a historical object from our collection, or want to browse through Maine artifacts, you can visit our online catalog PastPerfect. We recently added nearly 500 records and over 1,200 images to the catalog, which now contains almost 32,000 searchable records and 23,500 images for museum objects, photographs, manuscript letters, architectural drawings, and newspapers.

Newly added highlights: CMP collection objects, additional images from the Portland Press Herald glass plate negative collection, panoramic photographs, and additional Fogg collection autograph letters, including examples from artist Paul Akers and naturalist Louis Agassiz.

Additions to Maine Memory Network happen every day and we are now featuring 20,155 records! Contributors such as the L.C. Bates Museum and the Dyer Library Archives/ Saco Museum have been busy this summer adding new photos.

You can see what’s new to MMN and even subscribe to an RSS feed for new images and exhibits!

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Museums of Old York

Programs for adults

Thursday, August 4
Author Talk with David Remington at Remick Barn.
We are very pleased to offer an evening with David Remington, who will speak on his recently published book, Ashbel P. Fitch, Champion of Old New York. This biography of his great-grandfather provides a rare glimpse into the gilded age of New York City’s political world. Free for Members of Old York. $5 for nonmembers. Remick Barn, 7 p.m. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Saturday, August 6
Indian Encampment.
Well-known re-enactor, Ken Hamilton, presents a 17th-18th-century Indian Encampment during the day in front of the Remick Barn and Jefferds Tavern. This is a not-to-be-missed event with exciting activities for all age groups. Donations are appreciated. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Thursday, August 11
“History Challenge!” Game Show.
Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answer questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email rbowen@oldyork.org to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

Through Saturday August 13
Emerson House — 2011 Decorator Show House.
Our fundraiser continues with tours on Mon-Wed-Fri-Sat from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., and Sunday afternoons from 1-4 p.m. The house is closed to visitors on Tuesdays. Tickets are $20 at the door. We also have just a few tickets remaining for our final luncheon and designer discussion on August 10 at The York Harbor Reading Room. Tickets are $55 and include lunch, lecture and a full show house tour. To purchase tickets, please call (207) 363-4974. Visit our website for updates on the show house and other special events.

Sunday, August 14
Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed.
Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

Monday, August 15
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening. The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and Grand Opening of the Exhibit — Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer; Report on Library and Archives Project — Jessica Frankenfield, Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine, 5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m. Reception immediately following. Email development@oldyork.org for more information.

Fun for kids and families

Friday, August 5
Hearth Cooking Demonstration.
Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th -century receipts and techniques over the open fire. Watch and help as they prepare everything from fish and chicken to bread, pies and pudding using traditional methods such as Dutch ovens, iron kettles, and the bake oven. Stop in around 3:00 p.m. every Friday in July and August in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museums buildings. Email education@oldyork.org for more information.

Through Thursday, August 25
Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs.
Our summer camp programs for children build on the core curriculum of our school programs and provide children with learning experiences in a fun and supportive environment. Download a brochure and sign-up form for Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs for Children. Reservations are required for all programs. Programs run 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. and cost $23 ($20 members) unless otherwise indicated. For more information email education@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974.

~~~

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. I have made a few concessions to changes of the cover and some images, but the stories are all there. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Museums of Old York, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Moxie Days in Maine!

Maine in a bottle — Lisbon makes merry with Moxie during 3-day fest Nothing says summer in Maine like July fireworks, barbecues and bottles of Moxie. All of those — especially the sweet, medicinal, orange-labeled, black-tinted soft drink — will be in abundance this weekend during Lisbon’s annual Moxie Days Festival, carrying the 2011 theme of: “Moxie…

Lexington residents band together to preserve its history
A remote region east of Kingfield has a rich agricultural and logging history that was slipping quietly into oblivion. Twenty years ago, a tiny group of current and former residents formed the Lexington Historical Society to preserve and share those stories…

Civil War Trust Announces Initiative to Save 20,000 Acres To mark the sesquicentennial anniversary of the American Civil War, the Civil War Trust has announced an ambitious national campaign that will permanently protect 20,000 acres of battlefield land over the next five years. The Trust has already protected more than 30,000 acres in 20 states over the past two decades…

National Trust Releases Annual List of Most Endangered Historic Sites The National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP) recently released its 2011 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. To see the list of endangered sites visit the Trust’s website

Never-Before-Seen Beatles Photos What did you do when you were 18? When Mike Mitchell was that tender age, back in 1964, he took rolls and rolls of photographs documenting The Beatles’ first hysteria-inducing visits to America. Now, 50 lots of these unpublished and never-before-seen photographs, shot in black and white, will be auctioned off. Will you have to work eight days a week to afford a piece of rock-‘n’-roll history, or baby, are you a rich man? Check out a few of these Fab Four photos, and decide for yourself. Read”Never-Before-Seen Beatles Photos”

Bangor Band performs last concert at gazebo; structure to be torn down for arena As a child, Christine Mihan came to hear the Bangor Band perform at the gazebo in Paul Bunyan Park. On Tuesday night, Mihan attend the band’s last concert at the gazebo with her husband, Eric Mihan, and her 13-month-old daughter, Nella, all of Bangor. “It’s sad, very, very…

Fort Allen Park: Reclaiming the high ground Fort Allen was particularly valuable during the War of 1812 because its position high on Munjoy Hill meant its men could fire down on any British ships – whose guns weren’t designed to fire up steep hills…

Maine Historical Society Event;

Thursday, July 14, 4pm

Illustrated Lecture & Bicycle Tour:

“I am an Old Wheelman” John Calvin Stevens and the Art of Bicycling in Maine 1880-1900

Presenter and Ride Leader: Sam Shupe

Join us to learn about this significant yet largely unknown aspect of John Calvin Stevens’ life. During the last decades of the 19th century, the prominent architect was a passionate cyclist who was instrumental in creating and sustaining bicycle culture in Portland. This illustrated talk at MHS will be followed by a leisurely bike tour of several Stevens-related sites in Portland’s West End. Learn more.

Program and bike ride are free but registration for the ride is required. Please call (207) 774-1822.

Celebration to mark 40th anniversary of Raymond-Casco group In Casco on July 16, history will not only be retold, but it will be made as well. The Raymond-Casco Historical Society will be celebrating its 40th…

Maine museum exhibits, talks honoring Civil War soldiers The Norridgewock Historical Society, 11 Mercer Road, Route 2. Eight solders’ and sailors’ uniforms from various wars. Hours, 10 am-1 pm Saturdays through Labor Day. 634-3871…

Abbe Museum transports visitors to 1800s Wabanaki encampments It was also an opportunity for the museum to work with several Maine museums and historical societies for artifacts and expertise. The Bar Harbor Historical Society, Bangor Museum and Center for History, Maine Maritime Museum and Penobscot Nation

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Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it. Alternatively, you can go to my author site at this link: D.L. Soucy.

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Salt & Pines Anthology

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. I have made a few concessions to changes of the cover and some images, but the stories are all there. It’s now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Or, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: Books, breaking news, history, Maine, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Salt & Pines, our new book is available

Salt & Pines

Salt & Pines (click on the title to order, or for more information)

Print: $20.00

Download: $10.00

Salt & Pines: tales from bygone Maine is an anthology of stories and poetry about living in Maine’s bygone days. From the Islands of Casco Bay to the backwoods of Maine you’ll find tales to bring memories of your own to mind. Join us as we share Maine’s bygone days with;Allen Sockabasin, Ann Allen Brahms, D.L. Soucy, Dave Sargent, Doris Doggett, Jeanne Mason, Linda Aaskov, Luthera Dawson, Patricia Smith Ranzoni, Philip Candelmo, Philip Turner, Rene Cloukey, Roberta Gomez Ricker, Roy Fairfield, Ruth Richardson Maloney, Terrell Crouch, Thomas Carper, Tim Sample, Tom Fallon, Trudy Chambers Price, Salt & Pines, a taste of the ocean, the sound of the wind in the Maine forests….a combination you cannot find in any other state.

          
Categories: Books, historic preservation, history, Maine, preservation, restoration, Salt andPines project, stories, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A story from the Sixties…

Tater Pickin’

I can remember when I was a kid growing up that we had to pick potatoes every fall. It was a miserable job that didn’t pay very well. We thought it was great money back then though. I’ll never forget the year most farmers started paying fifty cents a barrel. Now, mind you, a barrel of potatoes held about two hundred fifty pounds or so. More if you put rocks in it, less if you put the stalks in. neither of which you were supposed to do.

It was a great way to get out of school for a few weeks though. We’d start school in September and go for a couple of weeks or so. Then we would have four weeks off for the harvest. It used to be five weeks, but as time went on, and more farmers bought harvesters it had shrunk to four. After I got older and moved on the season shrunk down to three weeks. But it was a miserable way to make a few bucks.

The days were long and hard, so we were usually pretty glad when it rained too hard and we would get off early. But the day was still pretty long. We had to be up out of bed before five AM so we could listen to the Harvest Report on the local TV station. That was a pretty interesting show. We’d be entertained by the tune ‘Tater Raisin’ Man’ or something like that; I don’t recall the name of it any more. Had to do with raising potatoes at any rate.

The show listed all the news that pertained to the harvest, like weather reports and so on. More importantly the show relayed messages from the farmers about the daily work. They would report who was hiring, who was going to start late or not at all. That was the most important part of the show. It would suck pretty bad to get everything ready and be at the corner to be picked up, only to realize after an hour of standing in the rain the truck wasn’t coming.

The farmer would pick us up around six o’clock or so. Sometimes earlier, depending on how many workers they had to pick up. They usually used an old pickup truck with a handmade cap made out of plywood. I can remember there being as many as twelve to fifteen people being crammed into the back. If the news could get a hold of that today the farmer would get sued for the way he treated his employees today.

The trucks had the special mixture of old dirt and sweaty workers odor. I don’t believe that could be scientifically recreated today. The driver would haul us out to the field being dug and leave us there with our lunches and clothing. You always had to bring extra clothing. Never knew what the day’s weather would bring. I can remember waking up to a snowstorm, waiting for the pickup truck while getting drenched and having a clear blue sky and eighty degrees temperature by mid afternoon. All on the same day.

It was always cold in the morning and hot in the afternoon. We could be wearing two sweatshirts, long johns and a jacket in the morning, and be in a t-shirt at lunch time. It wasn’t like that every day, but it happened quite often.

The foreman was the guy in charge of the crew, and usually one of the farmer’s families. He would walk off sections and put up a little plastic flag on a wire to separate them. The sections were different sizes and were given to the people the boss thought could handle them. If you couldn’t keep up you got a smaller section, and you got a bigger one if you got ahead.

The tractor pulled a machine we called a digger. It was a simple affair that had steel plates on the front that would be lowered into the ground to dig up the earth. It would scrape the earth just a few inches below the furrows and push the dirt, rocks and potatoes, and anything else in its path onto a conveyor made of steel rods. Some oval shaped cams would cause the belt to shake up and down as it ran around its pulleys.

The dirt and smaller rocks would fall through the belt, and the larger potatoes rocks and lighter tops and weeds would be deposited on top of the ground at the rear of the digger. We just had to pick up the potatoes and put them in the barrels.

The barrels would get dropped off every few feet into the rows that were just dug, by the guys working the truck. This was an old farm beater truck with a flat bed on it. There were stakes in pockets around the bed, and a chain was strung through them to hold the barrels in place.

When we were hired by the farmer we each got a stack of numbered tickets to put on the barrels when they were full. As the truck came back down the row the guy on back would pick them up with the hoist. This was a neat little rig that ran off the trucks PTO. That is a power take off. This was a device used to power equipment from the trucks motor. It was an incredibly simple device and I don’t believe there was anything else that could do the job better.

There were two half hoops hinged together with a rod. The rod was connected to a chain attached to the boom of the hoist. The device was simply thrown over the barrel. When the boom was lifted, the rod would lift and the two half hoops would try to hang straight. Since the barrel was in the way, they couldn’t, and as the chain lifted the bar the hoops would clamp onto the barrel and lift it up to the height of the trucks bed. The boom was simply swung over the bed, lowered and the clamp would release from the barrel. If you think about it, it was pretty cool because the truck never stopped. It would be driven down the rows at a constant rate of speed a there was never a barrel missed.

Sometimes there would be a Micmac family that would get a really huge section, sometimes as much as a quarter of the field. People would complain, but they really did deserve it. They worked harder than us kids would. I didn’t know it until later on but for some of them, that was their entire income for the whole year. One year there was a woman the next section down from them that got caught stealing barrels from them.

That was something you always had to watch for. We were given numbered cards to put on the barrels so you could get credit for them. There were spaces between the top hoop and the staves of the barrel, and you’d stick one of your tickets there. When the barrel got picked up, the guy running the hoist would put them in a box. At the end of the day the farmer would separate the numbers and count the tickets to see how any barrels you picked that day.

At the end of the week, which was always Friday, we’d hang around the barn while the farmer, or his wife, added everything up and wrote out a check for you. Some farmers actually gave cash in little pay envelopes. The woman that was stealing barrels would switch one of her tickets with theirs on the barrel closet to her section when no one was looking. One of the truck drivers caught on and she got fired on the spot. Back then that was what you did. There wasn’t any of the crap associated with getting terminated like there is today. Employers were not concerned with getting sued, because workers didn’t sue when they got fired. They went out and got another job.

That was pickin’. Hated every day of it. I can remember those days well. The cool morning air under a sky clear as spring water and a perfect turquoise blue. The pungent odor of the earth being turned and the wisps of steam drifting from it as the frozen soil warmed in the sun. The creaking of the hoist as the barrels was lifted onto the truck. Then there was the constant chinka-chinka-chinka from the digger echoing of the distant woods. Every now and then a deer would poke their heads out of the trees, only to jump back into hiding.

Slogging through mud in the rain, broiling in the afternoon sun. Ice cold cokes in glass bottles the drivers would pick up for you on the way back from the potato house. Sharing a smoke with a friend, and eating raw potatoes. Getting sick ‘because you ate them. Football or baseball during lunch. Hoping the digger would break down so you could get caught up and take a break. Bone tired and sore after getting home in the dark. Measly paychecks you couldn’t wait to get on Friday. Cashing them on Saturday and spending it all on stuff you didn’t need. Yep, hated every day of it. Wish I could do it again. Well, maybe just for a day or two. But that’s it.

‘Tater Pickin’ is a story of bygone days in Maine. One of the projects we are working on here at Remember ME! Media is a book called Salt & Pines. It will be an anthology of stories from across the state by many Maine writers. Check out the project at: http://saltandpinesproject.blogspot.com/ for more information and to keep tabs on it’s progress. We’re hoping to be able to have it out for sale well before the end of October of this year.

We’re looking for writers to contribute to this project, as we intend to issue at least one anthology per year, and hopefully more if the interest is their. It’ll be a great way to spread the heritage of the Pine Tree State around, especially if you’re thinking of gift giving.

Categories: Salt andPines project | Leave a comment

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