museum news

May Sarton 100th Anniversary Event at MoOY

Maine state historian to talk Civil War monuments
Sponsored by the Old Berwick Historical Society, the program is open to the public. Maine’s memorial monuments range in location and age, from Bangor in 1864, while the war was still in progress, to Lisbon in 1999. Many feature standing Union soldiers…

Don Perkins: Freeport takes pride in 1800s warship
This year marks the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, and the Freeport Historical Society is paying tribute with a special program on May 6 titled, “Free Trade and Sailors’ Rights — The War of 1812.” The town has significant connections to this…

Old radar station to become energy park near Moscow, Maine

MOSCOW, Maine — A former U.S. Air Force radar station in Maine’s northern forest has been purchased by a trio of New England companies including Cianbro of Pittsfield, according to a release issued by the companies Monday. The others two companies involved in the purchase…

In death, Portland woman reunited with long-lost love

Teresa Getchell spent decades seeking the truth about her husband’s wartime death in 1969


May Programs From the Museums of Old York:

3-6 May Sarton 100 Anniversary Event. Come celebrate the life and times of Poet and Author May Sarton! In collaboration with the York Public Library and the First Parish Church, the Museums of Old York will be hosting a Centennial Symposium of May Sarton. Registration is filling up so please visit the May Sarton 100 Website for more information and to sign up for the symposium.

6 American Girl Doll Tea – in Jefferds Tavern–KIDS PROGRAM stop in from 2-4 p.m. You and your American Girl Doll are invited to a special Colonial tea. Dress yourself and your doll in your prettiest outfits for an afternoon of proper enjoyment. Sip tea and enjoy cookies in Jefferds Tavern while you learn about the American Girl Felicity who protested tea drinking during the Revolutionary War. Make a mob cap for you and your doll in the Parsons Center program room. $5 per person, tickets available at the door.For more information please contact Zoe Keefer-Norris or call 207-363-4974 x12.

18 Tavern Dinner. Join us for this month’s ever popular historic dinner. Relax and kindle new friendships as colonial ladies prepare a fabulous meal at the hearth. Keep an eye on our website for upcoming menus and announcements of unique entertainments. Sign up soon –these dinners fill fast! $35 ($30 members) at the Parsons Education Center, 6 p.m.

20 Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center. $4 donation appreciated.

28 Buck-a-Building Memorial Day and Paddle-to-the-Sea. Come see the Museum properties, including the the Old Gaol, Emerson-Wilcox House, Elizabeth Perkins House, Jefferds Tavern, the School House, and our Exhibit, “The country heer is plentiful” Trade, Religion and Warfare in York and Southern Maine, open for $1 tours. At 2 p.m. families are invited participate in Paddle-to-the-Sea, a kid-focused program based on Holling Clancy Hollings children’s book by the same name. After hearing the story, build a little boat, label it with your family’s name and launch it down the river. Follow your boat’s journey to the ocean on our blog. $5 per mini boat at the John Hancock Warehouse. 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

News and Updates

Celebration of the Working and Playing Waterfront. A team of staff and trustees are looking ahead to summer and have been working to create an array of programs for 2012 all under the theme York’s rivers and ocean dominate its history. Celebrating our heritage on the water will take many forms. A series of fun and educational programs will be offered throughout June-July-August-September including a river regatta and barbeque, workshops, lectures and demonstrations on the history of lobstering, fishing, boat building, waterfront stories, riverscape painting, the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, and more! A brochure will be coming out in May detailing all the offerings over the summer. See our website for a preliminary schedule of events — stay tuned for updated information.

OAH/NCPH 2012

Highlights of the Organization of American Historians in Milwaukie from the History News Network;


Highlights from the 2012 OAH Annual Meeting in Milwaukee

David A. Walsh

Index

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Gov. William King

Headlines  

History comes to life … and, for the first time, is available online

“It brings history to life,” said Amoroso, a genealogy buff who is director of digital projects for the Maine Historical Society. Amoroso was one of many people who trolled through data on millions of mid-20th century Americans that became publicly…

Fires a part of Fort Kent’s history

“That section of town had never burnt,” Chad Pelletier, president of the Fort Kent Historical Society, said this week. “Those were some of the town’s original buildings from the 1880s.” Pelletier referenced a map from an old Roe & Colby atlas showing…

Events  

April event at Museums of Old York

15 Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. Join this lively bunch on the third Sunday of (almost) every month from 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI, email or call 207-363-4974 ext 13.

18 – 20 April Vacation Camp – History of Science — KIDS PROGRAM 9:30am —1:30PM. Travel back through the ages to experience the world as people begin to understand scientific principles. $65 ($60 members) Ages 5-12. Preregistration is required. All activities take place at the Parsons Center on the corner of York Street and Lindsay Road in York, Maine.

Wednesday: Travel back to ancient Greece where Archimedes proved the use of the lever and pulley. Demonstrate these principles using our giant trebuchet to throw watermelons far into the York River and haul them back using pulleys!

Thursday: Meet 17th century scientist Sir Isaac Newton and help him prove universal gravitation and the laws of motion. Build a marble roller coaster, race toy cars, and build a bottle tornado.

Friday: Experience the world of color! Learn about natural dyes, perform some amazing science experiment, and Tie Dye a t-shirt with chemicals and plants.

20 Tavern Dinner. Traditional hearth cooked meal in a cozy, colonial tavern environment. Menu includes Baked Stuffed Clams, Assorted Pickled Vegetables, Herbed Cheeses, Crackers, and Nuts, Shaker Stew with Chive Dumplings, Fiddleheads Dijon, and Pecan Pie with Whipped Cream. Bring your Favorite Beverage. 6-8 p.m. at Jefferds Tavern, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Cost: $30 members / $35 non-members. Reservations are required. Please email early to reserve your space.

Events at the Maine Historical Society

Tuesday, April 10, 12pm

The Titanic: A Survivor’s Story

Speaker: Dr. Karen Lemke, St. Joseph’s College

Thursday, April 19, 7pm

The Civil War of 1812

Speaker: Dr. Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis

Tuesday, April 24, 7pm

Gateways to Portland: Rebuilding Veterans Memorial and Martin’s Point Bridges

A panel discussion presented in partnership with Greater Portland Landmarks

Spotlight on Maine History

Gov. William Ring.

Portrait ca. 1806 by Gilbert Stuart

THE first Governor of Maine was a son of Richard King, of Scarborough, who is said to have been a man of surpassing natural ability. He was a merchant, and laid the foundation of his fortune from the profits he received as Commissary under Sir William Pepperell.

William King, the seventh child of Richard, was born in Scarborough, Me., February 9, 1768. He was half brother to Rufus King, the statesman, who took such an important part in the formation of our government. William had few advantages in his boyhood. While Rufus was fitting himself at Cambridge for the great eminence he afterwards attained in the nation, William was tending a sawmill in Saco. Notwithstanding his lack of early educational training, his wonderful native ability, his great natural resources, and his strong, energetic intellect forced him early to the front. He set his standard high, and his ambition was untiring and almost unconquerable. Being possessed of wonderful perceptive faculties and a sound judgment, he relied upon these to carry him through, and they never failed him. In native endowment, he was thought to have been superior to his celebrated brother, Rufus.

When a young man Mr. King removed to Topsham, where he lived for a time, but as the Kennebec River offered superior advantages for his lumbering and ship building operations, he removed to Bath in or about the year 1800, where he carried on business very extensively. He afterwards established the town of Kingfield, in Franklin County, of which he was at one time principal owner.

He was a merchant and ship-builder, in which he acquired a large fortune. At one time, he was one of the largest ship-owners in America. In politics, he was a Democrat, and being first in everything he was connected with, he was the leader of his party in Maine—the master mind that managed all the party machinery. He wielded an immense influence in favor of the separation of Maine from Massachusetts. He was President of the Convention that framed the Constitution of the State, and it was his great wisdom and good judgment that directed all the affairs in the formation of the new State.

Mr. King became immensely popular with the people, and was elected the first Governor of Maine by an overwhelming majority. He administered the office with marked ability and to the great satisfaction of the people. Before the expiration of his term, he was appointed a Commissioner under the Spanish Treaty at Washington. Upon receiving this appointment, he resigned the office of Governor of the State and entered upon the duties of his new office, which he also discharged with great ability. He afterwards accepted the appointment as Collector of Customs at Bath, which office he held from 183 1 to 1834. He was a prominent Free Mason and was the first Grand Master of Masons in this State.

Several writers have described his characteristics and personal appearance. John H. Sheppard, Esq., of Boston, said of him: “In his person he was tall and of a striking figure; and with a finely formed head, strongly marked features, high forehead, and black, impending brows, he had a natural and majestic air of command which impressed every beholder with respect.” Deane Dudly wrote; “The sound of his voice seemed to echo grimly from the deep concaves of his eyes, which from under their forest-like brows would sternly look a command that was not to be resisted by ordinary mortals. So conspicuous was he in every circle where he moved, that the most indifferent observer failed not to notice him.”

Mr. King was unfortunate in his last years, not only in the loss of a considerable portion of his property, but in the loss of friends and relatives, which broke down his once splendid mind so that at last his sun went down in darkness. He died at Bath, Me., June 17, 1852, and his wife died in Portland, July 4, 1857.

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U-Maine’s folklore collection to get new home at Library of Congress

Welcome to another round of Maine history headlines and news from around the web! A special thanks to those who have sent in links to share. Just a comment on that, by the way. Please make sure you have a valid description of your email in the subject line. If there is no relevant wording in the subject line it will go into spam, and as the amount of spam mail is increasing again, I will no longer look at emails in my spam box. Send in your news, links and event notifications to editor@touringmaineshistory.com if you have something to share.

As a note for future interest, I am interested in receiving guest posts from historical society fans covering meeting and events around the state of Maine. It will be a good way to share news of what you are doing with a greater audience than you might get otherwise.

If I do not get time to do another post before Thanksgiving, have a happy holiday, and enjoy the day!

Joe Steinberger: Rockland History, in Context
Freepress Online
by Joe Steinberger This Saturday at 12:30 pm at the Rockland Public Library, there will be a presentation by members of the Rockland Historical Society about the Lime Rock Railroad that once linked Rockland’s limestone quarries to the shore side kilns…

All aboard for history of Rockland’s industrial railroad
knox.VillageSoup.com
The Rockland Historical Society and the Rockland Public Library will present a multi-media program about Rockland’s Lime Rock Railroad on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 1:30 pm The program at the library will be preceded by the historical society’s annual…

Official issued proclamation against Penobscot Indians in 1755
Bangor Daily News
The page refers to “Documentary History of Maine,” Baxter Manuscripts, Vol. 24 Page 63, and also the Androscoggin Historical Society at http://www.rootsweb.com/~meandrhs. So in addition to taking land and spreading disease and paying Native Americans…

Belfast women sewed a patriotic legacy in 1864
Bangor Daily News
Discovering the phrase “Belfast, Maine, June 17, 1864” printed on a white stripe, the woman contacted the Belfast Historical Society. According to Pinette, after the Armory Square Hospital closed in 1865, the Belfast quilt “was most likely given to Dr…

Town histories a great source for veterans lists
Bangor Daily News
They are among the Abbot World War I veterans listed in “A Centeseptquinary History of Abbot, Maine 1827-2002,” a book that continues to be available through the Abbot Historical Society. Gerrish, Morse and Orff served in places such as St. Mihiel and…

UMaine ‘national treasure’ of folklore to get new home at Library of Congress

ORONO, Maine — Legend has it that the Maine Folklife Center hatched from a shoebox under the desk of University of Maine professor Edward “Sandy” Ives. Half a century ago, that box held just a few audio recordings of Mainers describing their way of life and way of making a…

Museums of Old York schedule of events;

November

19 Visual Language and Constructed Views: New Exhibits at George Marshall Store Gallery. Opening reception on Saturday Nov. 19, 5-7 p.m. This exhibition runs through December 18. Gallery Hours are Wed. – Sat. 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Sunday 1-4 p.m. and by appointment.

21 The Art of Wreathmaking
Join MOY staff as we prepare wreaths to decorate our historic properties for the holiday season.
Meet at 2 p.m. at Remick Barn in The Parsons Center, 3 Lindsay Road in York Village.

30 Gingerbread House Competition. Help the Museums of Old York decorate a gingerbread rendition of the John Hancock Warehouse. Use frosting and candy to add windows, shingles, a ramp and the ocean so the house can be entered in York Library’s gingerbread house contest! After helping with our gingerbread house, decorate your very own house in true Victorian holiday style to take home. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Registration required, ages 5 and up, $25 ($20 members).

December
3 A Christmas Tea at Jefferds Tavern. The Museums of Old York will once again host a favorite local holiday tradition at the historic Jefferds Tavern from noon until 4 p.m. on Saturday, December 3 as a part of the annual Festival of Lights celebration in York Village. This yuletide happening, managed again this year by volunteer Michele LaBranche, brings traditional Victorian-style holiday cheer to the entire family. Candlelight, a cozy fire, shining silverware, delicate teacups and Christmas greens set the stage at Jefferds Tavern. But the desserts are really the highlight created by local bakers and talented volunteers.

This year’s menu of tasty treats includes Apple Crisp, Harvest Pumpkin Pie, Cheesecake, Chocolate Cake, Raspberry Almond Pie, Lemon Pie, Fluffy Peanut Butter Pie, and Indian Pudding. Enjoy the ambiance, company of friends and delicious desserts as you warm yourself by the fire. The last sitting will be at 3:30 p.m. Admission is $6 and includes a choice of two desserts and tea. There is no charge for children under age 5. FMI, please email or call 207-363-4974.

14 Candle Dipping and Holiday Decor. Without electricity how did people light their homes at night? With candles of course! Dip your own candles for when the power goes out this winter or as a centerpiece for a holiday dinner. Create colorful curled candles, string cranberries and make a decoration for your window or Christmas tree. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Registration required, ages 8 and up, $10 ($8 members).

Categories: breaking news, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, stories, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Logging with Tractors in the Maine Woods

Casting Call for New Collecting Television Show From Worthpoint
Is collecting a part of your daily life? Are parts of your collection in every room of your house? Do you have unique and special objects that you are extremely proud of? Finally, do you want to show off your collection on television? The producers of “My Collection Obsession,” which will air on a national cable network, are currently looking for serious and dedicated collectors of all kinds who could appear on the show. Find out if your collection is truly obsessive enough to make the cut. Read”Casting Call for New Collecting Television Show”

PHOTO: Museum L-A site work begins

“It’s starting!” exclaimed an excited Rachel Desgrosseilliers, Museum L-A’s executive director, as she watched workers at the future site of the museum Thursday in Lewiston. Benjamin Construction’s Richard Lee, left, and Ed Benjamin, in the skid steer, were demolishing damaged sections of t…

Textile industry heritage celebrated
SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — A special fund-raising event that gives a nod to the thriving textile industry of the past will benefit the Old Berwick Historical Society this weekend. The Lighting Up Ball and second annual silent auction will be…

Presentation to feature Maine Indians
LISBON FALLS — The Lisbon Historical Society will host guest speaker and author, Nicholas Smith of Brunswick, at 7 pm Wednesday, Nov. 9, at the MTM Center. Smith will give a presentation on his recently published book, “Three Hundred years in Thirty,”…

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Logging with Tractors in the Maine Woods

Popular Science Monthly, 1916

LOGGING has remained for generations the most primitive of all modern operations. The logging railroad is a comparatively recent development, but even that falls far short’of being an active agent in reducing the vast waste necessitated by the fact that only such timbers can be moved out as will pay for expensive transportation. In the tropics a mahogany log worth hundreds of dollars in New York is valued at only a few demonetized dollars as it stands in its forest, and almost priceless hardwoods are left to rot or burned up in the clearing of ground simply because they cannot be “squared” to the formal size, about one foot on each side.

To a lesser degree the same problem faces the timber cutter in the forests of our own country. The long hauls through the woods to streams or roads, even to the roughest sort of logging roads, is discouragingly expensive, and from there to the railroad or mill entails another long haul with primitive means, either oxen or horses.

Modern power appliances are, however, slowly coming into use as they prove their worth. In certain sections of the Maine woods, where logging is the winter occupation of fanners from nearby sections, tractors are now in use. The drive on these engines is by caterpillar wheels, broad enough to keep from sinking into the snow, and the forward part of the tractor is mounted on sleigh runners, which are turned by hand to guide the tractor and its train of logging sleds.

The tractor is crude in a way, but it can reach sections of forest country to which even the ordinary logging railroad, with its clumsy engine, cannot readily penetrate.

In the tractor shown here, the runners at the front make steering easy and accurate. The unwieldy front wheels of the ordinary tractor would hardly serve in the forest.

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WWII Warbirds Flock to Auburn

Hello everyone! I’ve been vacationing, so a lot of news has been missed, but here is another roundup (a long one this time) of Maine history news highlights and headlines from around the state. Lots of exciting things going on, from the visit of some WWII warplanes to the LA municipal airport in Auburn. Also, a lot of events are still happening all over, even though Fall is coming, along with the traditional shuttering of many historical society operating seasons.

As usual, if you have trouble with a link, copy and paste it into your browsers search window to visit the site. And if you have any news to share ot events to schedule, feel free to email them to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com.

I would like to give a shout out this week to Susan Sheffield of Dover Delaware for emailing a couple of excerpts from an issue of the New England Magazine with a story about Thomas B. Reed. It is unusual to find something like that so far from its home area. Thanks Susan!

Journalist/author visits Thomaston Historical
Thomaston — Author Kevin C. Mills will discuss his journey researching his family history to publishing his first novel, “Sons and Daughters of the Ocean,” at the monthly meeting of Thomaston Historical Society at the Knox Farmhouse, 80 Knox St. The…

Author to discuss Civil War regiment from Maine at Heritage Day in Brooks
Brooks — Brooks Historical Society will hold its annual Heritage Day Open House on Sunday, Oct. 9 from 1-4 pm at the Pilley House. New this year will be a featured speaker Peter Dalton of Northport, author of “With Our Faces To The Foe: A History Of…

Bird talks on ‘Rockland, Maine’s Tidal Turn’
Rockland — On Tuesday, Oct. 11 at 6:30 pm, Rockland Public Library will present a talk John Bird on his recent book, “Rockland, Maine’s Tidal Turn.” The talk is co-sponsored by the Rockland Historical Society. Bird has compiled a series of columns…

Clean gravestones with water, elbow grease, gentle brushes
When I hear them talk about their travels — a newly discovered cemetery in Mercer, a historical society meeting in Hope — all I can think of is a pinball machine pinging them around Maine’s graveyards in need. Bill’s slide presentation took us along…

25 things to do this fall — festivals, foliage and fun
See how Mainers from the past two centuries got dressed up at the Maine Historical Society’s fashion in Maine exhibit, which runs into 2012. Hats, jewelry, shoes, hair combs, walking sticks and several complete costumes are on display along with a wide…

Irish lecture series proving to be a hit
A former teacher, he is a member of the Androscoggin Historical Society, Maine Historical Society and the Irish American Club of Maine. He has authored two books, “Early Murphy Descendants of Mary Hurley and James McCarthy” and “Androscoggin Irish…

Hauling History: Jon Hentz to share lobster trap lore
But through personal memory, research and craftsmanship, Hentz has hauled up more than a century’s worth of trap-making that he will present at the Georgetown Historical Society building Tuesday night. The free talk will trace the development from the…

Surprise takes WWII veteran back to old heights

A ride in a historic plane honors a Maine Tuskegee Airman who served his country and came home to face racial bias.

World War II bombers make stop in Auburn

AUBURN — “You see them on TV, but you never really know what they’re like inside,” marveled Russ Allen of Auburn as he made his way slowly through the belly of the B-17G Flying Fortress at the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport on Monday afternoon. Inside, the plane was a…

Wings of Freedom bringing vintage planes to airport

AUBURN — Former New Gloucester resident Tom Driscoll picks up the leather flying jacket that his father, Lt. John Driscoll Sr., wore when he piloted B-17s in the 1940s. The jacket is a family treasure and symbol of the stories that John finally began telling about the war near th…

Old Otisfield Town House may be raised to save historic listing

OTISFIELD — The old Otisfield Town House and the approximate one-half acre of land it sits on may be raised 52 inches so it can retain its listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The wood-frame 1905 building on Bell Hill Road has its original oak chairs and voting booth…

From WorthPoint; Q& A: Talking 125 Years of Coke
This year, Coca-Cola marks the 125th anniversary of the creation of the famous beverage, first introduced as a fountain drink in Atlanta, Ga., in 1886. The popularity of the sparkling refreshment was aided by a merchandising frenzy, as thousands of mass-market advertising collectibles were produced over the years—from promotional items, holiday-themed items and signs—and all proved to be pretty durable, making collecting fairly easy. In that vein of thought, Worthologist Liz Holderman interviews Denis Bardin, the president of the Coca-Cola Collectors Club. Check out what hardcore Coke collectors are looking for these days. Read “Q & A: Talking 125 Years of Coke”

Museums of Old York Events:

October
3 Needle Wizards. Join us every Monday morning as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery at 3 Lindsay Road for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information, email Cindi Young-Gomes at registrar@oldyork.org.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apples, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Parsons Center. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. Members free. $5 for teens and adults and family rates for non-members.

Maine Historical Society Events:


Tuesday, October 4, 12pm

Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Get in the mood for the World Series with this wonderful new memoir of growing up with the Temple Townies in the 1940s and ’50s. Our Game Was Baseball follows A Soldier’s Son, Hodgkins’ poignant memoir of his childhood in Temple, Maine during World War II. Hodgkins interviews former team members, recounts his own passion for the Townies, and explores the central role the Townies played in the life of this western Maine community.

Friday, October 7, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk: Two Fabulous Fashion Exhibits

Thursday, October 13, 7pm

Book Talk: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light

Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm

Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Categories: antiques, articles, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, preservation, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Mitchell B-25 and the Panchito

This film contains archival footage and video taken by the Remember ME! Media crew at the Great State of Maine Air Show, 2011 in Brunswick Maine. The Panchito is a faithfully restored B-25 medium bomber used in conjunction with the DAV’s outreach program to spread the services available to our veterans in the US.

The purpose of this short film is to tell the story of this fabulous little bomber and the impact that it had on all theaters of the WWII conflict. Primarily utilized in the Pacific Theater, the B-25’s most famous moment was when Lt. Colonel “Jimmy” Doolittle used 16 of these airplanes in a daring sea launched raid over Japan.

Launched 600 miles from Japan from the aircraft carrier the USS Hornet after having been prematurely discovered by the Japanese, these airmen volunteered without exception to carry on with the mission, even though they knew there would be insufficient fuel to carry them to safe bases in China where they could be safely recovered.

All but one plane crashed, and the one surviving plane was confiscated when the pilot landed in Russia.

The plane used in the clips from the movie Aerial Gunner was not actually a B-25, although I had been assured it was. It is actually what was designated a B-34, or more properly a Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon/Ventura. My guess would be that there were no B-25’s available for filming, and this is the closest variant the film company could come up with.

However, the set props were B-25 components for the most part. Remember that Hollywood is Hollywood, and artistic license trumps detail nearly every time.

It was still a great little movie and worth seeing sometime, and can be downloaded in full from the Prelinger Archives, along with miles of other vintage footage.

Enjoy the video!

Categories: antiques, events, historic preservation, history, Maine things to do, museum news, preservation, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

Note: If you have problems with the links, simply cut/copy and paste into your browser to open them.

Adelbert Ames and His Recollection of the Attempted Robbery in Northfield

Adelbert Ames was born in Rockland, ME, on Oct. 31, 1835. He graduated West Point Academy in 1861 and was commissioned to the 2nd U.S. Artillery and fought in the First Battle of Bull Run where he earned the Medal of Honor. He was later reassigned to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862 where he fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg…

Hurricanes of New England
Maps are available at the Weare Historical Society if you’d like to walk through … on record as the costliest and deadliest storm in New England history…

Old house requires special, loving care
I have had the privilege of … In the end, they offered the house to the Norway Historical Society…

Audience Calendar
Illustrated Lecture: History of Silk in America, Nancy Greenleaf and Sally Williams, Hiram Historical Society, free. 625-4762. 2:30 pm Saturday. …

Bangor Museum and History Center getting a museum makeover
A week after selling a rare … And with the Massachusetts Historical Society, which already has volumes one …

Three Chums tell tales of friendship at Lovell’s Brick Church Sept. 9
Gilman, a New Hampshire storyteller who periodically wanders into Maine… Baked Bean Awareness Month speaker for the Fryeburg Historical Society. …

Prospect News
The Prospect Historical Society will hold a meeting Sept.12th. in the Town Hall at 7:00 PM. Will be discussing the final Yard Sale at the Marsh School…

Publication on Dover-Foxcroft will be a genealogist’s treasure
The couple has long been involved with the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society and its home at the Observer building. Nancy is former president of MGS, and Jack is the current president. The Maine Genealogical Society produces its special publications …

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

It has taken more than 10 years, but recent place name changes approved by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names have removed the final racial slurs from Maine maps. The six locations, all in Aroostook County, are now named Scopan, Scopan Inlet, Scopan Knob, Scopan Lake, …

Archaeologists in Illinois dig to find civilization that vanished

The largest excavation of a prehistoric site in the country is poised to solve a riddle about Illinois prehistory that has lingered for a century — where did the Mississippians go? And why? An enormous dig of a village site first inhabited about 1050 A.D. is providing so much data and so many artifacts that archaeologists are daring to speculate that basic questions about the Mississippians will finally be answered.

~~~

From Museums of Old York:

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

PLEASE NOTE:
The “History Challenge” programs previously scheduled for Thursday, September 1 and Thursday, September 8 at 7 p.m. in The Parsons Center have been cancelled.
Our regular programming and exhibits in The Parsons Center will be suspended from September 1 through September 11 so that we may bring you The Fourth Annual Antiques Show!

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

19 “The Country Heer is Plentiful” exhibit of Trade, Religion and Warfare and Southern Maine 1631-1745 resumes in the upstairs gallery at The Parsons Center during regular museum hours.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Click here to view the scrumptious menu on our website. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany the hearth-cooked meal. Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Seating is limited to twenty and reservations are required. Please email Richard Bowen or call (207) 363-4974 to make your reservation by September 21.

26 Needle Wizards. Every Monday morning starting the 26th of September. Join our Needle Wizards as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information email Cindi at registrar@oldyork.org.

29 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

October

3 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apple, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Remick Barn. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. $5 for teens and adults/ $15 for families. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

31 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

~~~

From the Maine Historical Society:

MHS News

New Exhibit Explores One Way High Fashion Came to Maine

The new exhibit in the Lecture Hall Gallery, “Having in Paris a Great Success”: French Fashion, 1928-1936, features sheets from Paris fashion houses that demonstrate one source of fashion inspiration for well-to-do women in Maine during the 1920s and 30s. The sheets, which are drawn from MHS’s Mildred G. Burrage Collection, include beautiful hand-drawn illustrations of the latest styles and fabric samples.

This show is mounted in conjunction with Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In, our current museum exhibit.


Fall Program Highlights

Tuesday, October 4, 12pm
Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Thursday, October 13, 7pm
Book Event: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm
Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Wednesday, October 26, 7pm

Book Event: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Presenter: Colin Woodard, Author

Thursday, November 10, 7pm
In Partnership with the Colonial Dames in Maine
Tales from an Art Detective: Tracing Nazi-era Provenance at the MFA

Presenter: Victoria Reed, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Categories: antiques, archeology, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, indians, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chamberlain Days and Lovers leap in Bangor

It’s time for another annual Joshua Chamberlain Days event in the town of Brunswick Maine, hosted by the Pejepscot Historical Society.

Here’s the ininerary from their website, which you can find here in its entirety, as well as more on this Civil War heroe from Maine.

CHAMBERLAIN DAYS 2011

AUGUST 25 – 28, BRUNSWICK DOWNTOWN

Thursday, August 25

7 pm – Opening Lecture – Thomas Desjardin, Chamberlain scholar

Title: “The Chamberlain You Never Knew”

Location: Curtis Memorial Library, Morrell Room

Friday, August 26

11 am – Walking Tour of Chamberlain’s Brunswick

Guide: John Cross

Logistics: Meet at the Chamberlain statue at the corner of Maine St.

and Bath road, free but registration required (call 729-6606).

12 – 5 PM – Civil War Encampment with 20th Maine Regiment

Logistics: Brunswick’s Lower Mall, Free and open to the public.

2 pm – Workshop – “The Life and Times of a Confederate Surgeon and Medical

Practices of the American Civil War”

Presenter: Chris Nulle (15th Alabama Company G reenactor)

Logistics: Lower Mall (with rain location, PHS Museum)

4 – 6 pm – General Chamberlain Reception

Host: The Brunswick Inn, 165 Park Row, Brunswick

$25 donation per person, cash bar

(tickets available through PHS and during Chamberlain Days)

6 pm – Centennial Band Concert – 19th century music

Location: Gazebo on the Brunswick Mall

Saturday, August 27

10am – 5 pm – Civil War Encampment with 20th Maine Regiment

Location: Brunswick’s Lower Mall, Free and open to the public.

10 am – Walking Tour of Chamberlain’s Brunswick.

Guide: John Cross

Location: Meet at the Chamberlain statue at the corner of Maine St. and

Bath road, free but registration required (Call 729-6606)

11 am – Workshop – “The Life and Times of a Young Confederate Soldier”

Presenter: Kate Nulle

Location: lower Mall (with rain location, PHS Museum), free but

donations welcomed!

12 – 1:30 – Civil War Bake Sale – Hardtack, 1800’s candy, beef jerky etc.

Location: Lower Mall

1 pm – Lecture – By author Ned Smith Maine author and scholar will be presenting a talk on

“22nd Maine Infantry”

Location: Morrell Meeting Room, Curtis Memorial Library, Brunswick

2 pm – Lecture – Diane M. Smith, author of Fanny and Joshua: The enigmatic

Lives of Frances Caroline Adams and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (1999,

Thomas Publications)

Location: Morrell Meeting Room, Curtis Memorial Library, Brunswick

7 – 8:30 pm – “From the Land of Spruce Gum and Buckwheat Cakes!”

A series of readings and song from Joshua Chamberlain and contemporaries

of the Civil War.

Location: Theater Project, 11 School Street, Brunswick.

Tickets: suggested $10 (on sale through PHS or during Chamberlain Days)

Sunday, August 28

9 am – Parade of Respect and Honor – Leaving from the 20th Maine Encampment on the

Brunswick Mall to Chamberlain Family gravesite in Pine Grove Cemetery.

(all welcome to join – meet on the mall at 8:45 am)

Organized by:

PEJEPSCOT HISTORICAL SOCIETY

159 Park Row, Brunswick, ME 04011

207-729-6606

Please contact Interim Executive Director, John Briley, with any questions.

~~~

Lovers leap, on the Kenduskeag in Bangor Maine

It seems as though every state in the Union has a lovers leap, some have more than one, and Maine is no exception. Up in Bangor, just outside of town on the Kenduskeag is a massive, and impressive cliff known as Lovers Leap. It is situated just across the stream where William Potter built a sawmill in 1795. The tales are many as to how this spot became known as Lovers leap, and the piece by Walter Allen Rice at the end of this post is probably the best legend. But no matter how the spot came to be called lovers leap, it didn’t prevent it from becoming a famed meeting place for lovers of all ages.

Young men would carve lines of prose into the trunks of trees extolling the virtues of their loves, and here are a couple of inscriptions that had been copied for The History of Penobscot County in 1882.

Lines copied from a tree in a beautiful and romantic spot on the banks of the Kenduskeag;

Miss…Thy beauty rivals all the classic pride
Of sculptured forms that taste has deified;
Love’s earliest light plays timidly and shy
In the soft lustre of that gentle eye;
Yet have I dared, thou most enchanting maid,
To inscribe thy name within this hallowed shade:

Another Inscription copied from a tree near Lover’s Leap:
Miss …Of lovely Sophia’s eyes beware,

Mirth and mischief mingle there;

I with her have careless laugh’d,

Nor fear’d shy beauty’s dangerous shaft;

But pensive now I linger heTe,

To trace a name forever dear.

Here is a photo of Lovers leap I took while on a visit to Bangor:

THE LOVERS LEAP
A Legend ; Walter Allen Rice

It is down mid the forests of Maine,

Where Kenduskeag still flows thro’ the hills,

From the days when the Indian held reign,

Whence cometh this legend that thrills

The listener’s heart. Long ago,

When the settler first paddled this stream,

Long ‘ere the wide woods were laid low,

Or the red man awoke from his dreams;

Up circled the smoke to the sky

From a wigwam where dwelt Raven Hair;

Not a brave of the tribe but would die

For the sake of this maiden most fair,—

For the love of the chief’s only child;

Though twenty brief summers had flown,

On none of the band had she smiled,

But to all her young heart was as stone.

The chieftain oft grieved as he thought

Of his daughter so cold and so proud,

And entreated to better her lot,—

Yield her heart and her hand to White Cloud ;

But sadly she bowed the fair head,

And firmly she answered him “nay”;

For “another she’d promised,” she said,

And she turned from her father away.

“My daughter, what stranger has won

The pride of thy father’s brave band ?”

Proud the answer—”The settler—the son

Of the paleface—the brave Iron Hand.”

The fierce warriors stole forth on that night

To the vale where the villagers lay,—

But swifter than they in her flight

Raven Hair thro’ the wood sped away.

At his post her young lover she found,

In a breath all their danger she told ;

About her his strong arms he wound,

And kissed the fair cheeks strangely cold:—

“Iron Hand, for thy life thou must flee,

There is war ‘tween the red and the white;

So risk not thy welfare for me—

Forsake Raven Hair this sad night.”

“Forsake thee, my own!” and his breath

Fell hot on the dusky maid’s cheek,

“Not in life—but united in death,”

His husky voice choked nor could speak.

“By death we escape the dire hate

Of thy father and scorn of the white;

Yonder stream cannot tell of our fate,

Shall we go to the hunting-grounds bright?”

In answer her hand pressed his own,

Together they sped toward the stream,

Till they stood on the cliff high and lone,

Like a phantom—a vision—a dream;

But a moment two shadows as one

Were darkly outlined on the sky,

Then a leap through the air—it was done;

‘Twas the depth of their love e’en to die.

Categories: history, Maine, Maine things to do, museum news, stories, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ponce’s Landing, Long Island

Headlines and articles on Maine history news

Historic Town House to hold unveiling ceremony in Dixmont

DIXMONT, Maine — An unveiling ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, at the historic Dixmont Town House, 702 Western Avenue in Dixmont. A historic marker recently was provided and installed at the Dixmont Town House by Central Maine Power Co. The Dixmont Historical Society invites the public to attend the ceremonies. Refreshments will be served. The Town House will be open to view the work that has been done to save the historic building, and members of the Historical Society Committee will be on hand to discuss future plans. For more information, call 234-2271.

Chamberlain Days kicks off Thursday
BRUNSWICK — The Pejepscot Historical Society will sponsor Chamberlain Days, a series of lectures, workshops, and other Civil War related programs for the general public. Programming begins at 7 pm Thursday in the Morrell Meeting Room at Curtis…

Holy History! Churches share stories
The editors were made up of people who had writing skills as well as a knowledge of local history, said historical society Member Sallie Huot, who was one of the editors, as well as the writer of the chapter on the history of Trinity Episcopal Church…

Work of 1800s itinerant artist focus of talk, tours
These are the pastoral views painted on the walls of local historic homes by artist Rufus Porter. History buffs and art admirers attended the Aug. 6 Townsend Historical Society “Porter Landscape School Murals: a Talk and Tour,” led by Rufus Porter…

Historic Orono mill torn asunder as town makes way for condo project

ORONO, Maine — When an excavator’s grapple peeled part of the roof off the old Webster Mill on Monday evening, the crowd that had gathered to watch the demolition of the more than 130-year-old building let out a cheer. The cheers grew louder when the grapple came down on the…

‘Sacred ground’ of Popham settlement commands archaeologist’s attention

PHIPPSBURG, Maine — Dr. Jeffrey Brain sat on a boulder at the edge of a nondescript field near the mouth of the Kennebec River, enjoying the view. Fishing boats puttered by in the swirling currents, cutting through blazes of sunshine cast up by the rippling water. A clam harvester donning…

An island prison: Rugged St. Croix Island brought ghastly death to early settlers

Editor’s Note: This is the first of three stories examining Maine’s historic role in the settling of the New World. The other two parts will run Monday and Tuesday. ROBBINSTON, Maine — When French settlers set out to claim parts of the New World at the turn of the 17th…

States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards
Looking for a fun collection that won’t break the bank or something for your children to collect? Worthologist Bonnie Wilpon says that one collection that’s easy to start while on vacation is state humor postcards, which can be found in gas stations, restaurants, hotels, airports and local shops, in addition to postcard shows and on online collecting sites for when you get back home. While every state likes to poke fun at itself and its residents, there are some jokes that transcend state boarders: Can you guess what “bird” is claimed by 30 different states as their “official” winged denizen? Bonnie will show you some examples. Read “States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards”

‘Clipperways’ to be razed

The 113-year-old home has been called ‘the jewel of Prouts Neck.’ The new owner will build another house…

Museum News:

Museums of Old York

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

August

19, 26 Hearth Cooking Demonstrations. Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th-century recipes and techniques over the open fire. Stop in Fridays around 3:00 p.m. to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museum buildings.

25 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of areas outside the village proper. Email Richard Bowen for more information.
23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany their hearth-cooked meal.Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Reservations required. Email Richard Bowen for more information.

29 History Brought to Life. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates. See above for more info.

October

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. Thursday, October 6, 7 p.m. Remick Barn.
15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Remick Barn Visitors Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the Remick Barn at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween. For the third year in a row, Old York invites you to meet the ghosts of the long-departed residents of the local area. Look for details in September. Saturday, October 29, 6 – 8 p.m.

Maine Historical Society


Monday-Friday, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: Innocent Interlude, Scenes of Life in Portland, Maine 1940-41

Take a tour of Portland in the early 1940s through this remarkable series of color films made by city officials. (60 minutes) More info

Wednesday, August 24, 11am

Family Tour of the Wadsworth-Longfellow House More info

Thursday, August 25, 11am

The Longfellow Trail: An Urban Expedition: Guided walking tour through downtown Portland More info

Saturday, August 27, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: The Dave Astor Show Visits Jordan’s Meats

In this episode recorded in 1962 (the only episode of the Dave Astor Show that still exists), Dave and his students celebrate the opening of the new Jordan’s Meats plant in Portland with song, dance, and lots of fun. (60 minutes) More info

Penobscot marine Museum

Greetings From Hampden: Selections from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Collection: Slide talk by Kevin Johnson, Photo Archivist. Sponsored by Hampden Historical Society. At Kinsley House, 83 Main Rd., So. Hampden, ME. For more information: hampdenmaine.com or 207-862-2027, Aug. 22, 7 p.m.

Historic Photos of Jonesport: Kevin Johnson will show historic images of Jonesport and environs from the Eastern Illustrating Collection. At Peabody Memorial Library, 162 Main Street, Jonesport, ME. For more information: 207-497-5644. Aug. 25, 7 p.m.

Shadowbox Workshop: Learn how to make dioramas inspired by the work of Anne-Emmanuelle Marpeau. At the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine. To register, contact Susan Henkel: 207-548-2529 ext.202. Sept. 17, 9 a.m.

And We’ll Be Exhibiting at:

Belfast Harbor Fest, Aug. 20

Camden Windjammer Festival, Sept. 2-4

Common Ground Fair, Sept. 23-25

~~~

Today’s postcard pick shows both Ponce’s and Trefethen’s Landing on Long Island, just outside Portland Harbor. Roberta Gomez Ricker has a story called At the Base of Ponce’s Landing in our new book, Salt & Pines, available through your local bookseller or online at History Press. It is a fine story that describes not only some of the hardships island living presents, but some of the joys life on one of Maine’s islands can bring as well. Islanders are a special kind of people, and this story will help at least one tale live on when all else has been forgotten. You may have caught the piece on the book in this past Sunday’s Portland Press’ Audience section, but if not head on over and check it out here. Volume two is just about ready to go, with just some minor editing and image placements remaining, and I’m currently accepting submissions for volume three. If you’d like to learn more, email your questions to me at editor@remembermemedia.com

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Katahdin

Southern Maine town restores 1-room schoolhouse | The Republic
In 2006, it was donated to the Waterborough Historical Society. Resident Teresa Lowell, who attended Saturday’s rededication, tells the Journal Tribune that “it just gives you goose bumps” to think of the children at their desks…

New exhibits on display at Brooks Historical Society’s open house
VillageSoup Belfast
This one features places, many in Maine. If you are really interested in Brooks’ history, come look through notebooks entitled “Dow Family Papers’ and “Hiram Pilley Papers.” Hiram was a shoemaker, who bought many of his supplies from Colburn Shoe Store…

Book captures cities’ church histories
KeepMEcurrent.com
SACO – Residents of Saco may be surprised to learn that the first Salvation Army presence in Maine was in the city and that the Jewish…

Dixfield Historical Society holding flower festival
Lewiston Sun Journal
DIXFIELD — The Dixfield Historical Society’s annual Festival of Flowers, open to western Maine flower lovers and the visiting public, will be held on Sunday, Aug. 21, in the Dixfield Historical Society’s Charter Meeting Room…

Katahdin

By Ann Blalack

I thought I would share this piece of original artwork from Bangor’s Ann Blalack. It is an ink and pastel on paper rendition of a canoeist on Katahdin Lake, with Mount Katahdin in the background. The image was selected to be placed in the First volume of Salt & Pines, and is shown in the book in black and white on page 159. To see more Maine images and read the stories about Maine’s bygone days you can pick up the book through your local retailer, my Amazon page or directly through History Press.

Katahdin is a place of much wonder and history in the state of Maine, and in the past has been the center of aboriginal superstition as it was supposed to be the home of Pomoola, or the Indian devil, thought to haunt the woods of Maine and was the cause of much of the Indian origin stories. It is a long story with much to share, so dig in and learn some of Maine’s history.

Maine Historical Society News:

This Week

Beat the Heat: Movies at MHS

Saturday, August 20, 2pm

The Dave Astor Show Visits Jordan’s Meats

In this episode recorded in 1962 (the only episode of the Dave Astor Show that still exists), Dave and his students celebrate the opening of the new Jordan’s Meats plant in Portland with song, dance, and lots of fun. (60 minutes)

Daily, Monday-Friday, 2pm

Innocent Interlude, Scenes of Life in Portland, Maine 1940-41

Take an amazing tour of Portland in the early 1940s through this remarkable series of color films made by city officials. (60 minutes)

Screenings are held in our air-conditioned lecture hall. Ticket price included with museum or house admission. Details online.

Family Programs at MHS

Wednesdays at 11am, through August 31

The Children’s Hour: Family Tours of the Wadsworth-Longfellow House

Thursdays at 11am, through August 25

The Longfellow Trail: An Urban Expedition: Guided walking tour through downtown Portland.

Details online.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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