collectibles

Maine Museum Highlights for June

From the Museums at Old York

Junior Docents Back for the Summer

This summer we have fifteen Junior Docents ranging in age from 12-18. Seven of these students will be joining us for the first time this summer from Wolfsboro and Stratham NH, and Kittery ME. The rest of the teens, all from York have been with the program for two to six summer, finding time to volunteer at the Museums between summer sports and part time jobs. New and returning docents will be busy once again giving costumed interpretation to visitors, working on colonial crafts, creating an exhibit for the York Public Library and assisting with the Morning Adventures for children. For more information about the Junior Docents Program, please visit our website.

Museums Open for the Season

Museum Hours: Monday through Saturday, 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
(NOTE: museums are closed on July 4 for the holiday)
Library and Archives Hours: Thursdays and Fridays 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., 12:30 p.m. – 4 p.m., and Saturdays 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Tours: 10:00 a.m. Elizabeth Perkins House; 11:00 a.m. Emerson-Wilcox House; 12:00 p.m. Ramsdell House, 1:00 p.m. Emerson-Wilcox House,
2:30 p.m. Elizabeth Perkins House.

For more information, please call the Visitor Center (207) 363-1756 or visit our website.

Programs for Kids and Adults

For a complete and up-to-date calendar of Museums of Old York programs see our website.

July
4 Museums of Old York are closed for the holiday

5 (thru August 25) Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs
Our summer camp programs for children build on the core curriculum of our school programs and provide children with learning experiences in a fun and supportive environment. Download a brochure and sign-up form for Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs for Children.
Reservations are required for all programs. Programs run 9am-12pm and cost $23 ($20 members) unless otherwise indicated. For more information email Zoe Keefer-Norris or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting.

7 “History Challenge!” Game Show
Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answe questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Contact Richard Bowen at rbowen@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting to register your team. Meet at 7:00 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

10 Lost York: The History That Nature Has Reclaimed
Mt. Agamenticus hike. See the remnants of the WWII military installation and the Big A Ski Area from the 1960s-70s. Explore cellar holes and rock walls from the past. Discuss the legends of St. Aspinquid and topics related to local Native Americans and their customs and rituals. Contact Richard Bowen at rbowen@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting to reserve your space or to get more information. Meet at Mt. A summit. 2:00 p.m. Sunday, July 10.

22 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern
Join us for a summer sampler of local seafood, beef, fresh vegetables, and desserts of local fresh fruits. Weather permitting, we will move outside to the bluestone terrace. We will supply all of the food, so please feel free to bring your own favorite summer beverage. Friday, July 22, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. $30 per person; $25 for members. Reservations required. Contact Richard Bowen at rbowen@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (207) 363-4974 end_of_the_skype_highlighting to reserve your space or to get more information.

28 History Brought to Life
Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

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From the Penobscot Marine Museum

Penobscot Marine Museum has added a new picture framing department to serve the museum’s own needs and well as those of retail customers. Professional framer Lin Calista, formerly of Frame by Frame in Searsport, has joined the staff to manage the shop.

The museum has an ongoing need to mount and frame photos, paintings and other objects for its collections, travelling exhibits and educational programs. This new capability enables us to provide retail customers with the same services. A range of framing materials and styles is available, from standard-quality to archival. Museum members and artists having their own work framed receive a 10 percent discount.

Hours

Tuesday through Friday, 10-4,

Saturday 10- 2.

(Closed Sunday and Monday)

The Museum Framer at Penobscot Marine Museum

Located in the Admission Center, 40 E. Main St., Searsport, 207-548-0334

email
www.museumframer.com

Year 75 is Under Way – Help Us Celebrate with a Sponsorship

This year’s headline exhibit is 75 for 75, featuring 75 items from the museum’s 75 years. Click here for a look at every item in the exhibit, and join us in celebrating our three-quarters-of-a-century milestone by sponsoring one or more items. Your name will appear beside the exhibit item and online (of course we’ll also respect requests for anonymity), and you’ll be helping us pave the way toward a full century.

Free Admission for Military Families

Active-duty military personnel and their families now enjoy free admission at Penobscot Marine Museum, due to our new “Blue Star Museums” program.

“Penobscot Marine Museum is proud to give a little something back to the men and women of our nation’s armed forces in recognition of their dedicated service to our country,” said Executive Director Liz Lodge. “We look forward to welcoming them and their families with free admission for the entire year.”

More than 1,300 museums nationwide are participating in

Blue Star Museums, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and Blue Star Families. For the complete list of participating museums, visit www.arts.gov.bluestarmuseums.

Art Sought for ShipShapes

An exhibit of whimsical boat-themed sculpture is going on display at Penobscot Marine Museum, and the public is invited to contribute additional pieces to the community art project.

Called ShipShapes, the exhibit features boat models made from a variety of unexpected materials: buttons, felt, cardboard, costume jewelry, alphabet blocks, sea shells, bottle caps, or just about anything that spurs the artist’s imagination. Any kind of boat or ship, real or imaginary, can be depicted. The only requirements are that it stands up by itself and fits into an imaginary one-foot cube. Click here for more

Lighthouse Challenge Includes PMM

The Midcoast Maine Lighthouse Challenge is a two-day self-guided driving tour of Midcoast Maine’s lighthouses (Dyce Head, Fort Point, Grindle Point, Rockland Breakwater, Owls Head, Marshall Point and Pemaquid Point) and the Maine Lighthouse Museum. It’s a once-a-year opportunity to visit and climb the towers of seven lighthouses in one weekend.

Penobscot Marine Museum is a “bonus site” on the tour, and participants who visit us will receive a small memento. More information.

More Events and Exhibits

Searsport Lobsterboat Races and Antique Power Day

A town-wide day of activities: Lobsterboat races, antique engine and lobsterboat exhibit, crafts for children, rowing race, craft sale and more. 7/9, all day

Penobscot Bay Day – 75th Birthday Edition

Free museum admission, birthday cake, crafts, live music, balloons, presentations, demonstrations, the Grand Opening of the new Seabag Visible Storage Center, and more. 7/23, all day

And We’ll Be Exhibiting at:

Maine Boats Homes & Harbors Show, Rockland, Aug. 12-14

Belfast Harbor Fest, Aug. 20

Camden Windjammer Festival, Sept. 2-4

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From the Maine Historical Society

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit: Working Women of the Old Port

This exhibit explores the many places and ways that women worked in Portland in the early 20th century–from canneries and schools, to department stores. The exhibit is based on the book, Working Women of the Old Port: A Portland Women’s History Trail. This self-guided tour was developed by the Portland Women’s History Trail and the USM Department of History. View exhibit. To purchase a copy of the book, click here.

News Feed

MHS receives State Historic Preservation Award for Renovation of

Brown Library and Garden

Maine Preservation has awarded MHS a 2011 Statewide Historic Preservation Honor Award for the restoration and rehabilitation of the Brown Library and Longfellow Garden. The award was presented at a ceremony on June 9 at the Franco-American Heritage Center in Lewiston.

Maine Memory Network Recognized by Family Tree Magazine

Family Tree Magazine has included Maine Memory Network in its annual listing of the 101 best family history websites. Click here to view the full list which will be published in the magazine’s September 2011 issue. Family Tree is America’s largest-circulation genealogy magazine, helping readers discover, preserve, and celebrate their family history.

Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Garden

Open for the Season!

Hours and Tours

Monday-Saturday, 10:30am – 5pm. First tour at 10:30, then tours on the hour.

Sunday, noon – 4pm. Tours on the hour, last tour at 4pm.

Admission*

Members: Free

Adults: $12

Seniors, AAA, Students: $10

Children: $3, Under 6: Free

*Price includes admission to the Museum exhibits and Beat the Heat movies.

The garden is always free and open to the public during business hours.

Categories: Art Exhibit, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, grants, headlines, history, lighthouses, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lisbon Historical Society to commemorate Civil War

Local history book launched The Waldoborough Historical Society will host the release and signing of “Citizens Who Heard the Call to Political Service: Waldoboro, Maine 1773-2010,” written by Jean MB Lawrence. Wednesday, June 15 at 6 pm at the society’s museum

Lisbon Historical Society to commemmorate Civil War Charles W. Plummer in the persona of Maine’s Civil War hero General Joshua L. Chamberlain. LISBON FALLS — The Lisbon Historical Society will feature a guest speaker in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War at 7 pm Wednesday, June 8

Baked bean supper to benefit Prospect community projects The Belfast Historical Society will display the 1864 Civil War soldiers flag quilt from 4 to 7 pm Flag Day, Tuesday, June 14, at the Belfast Free Library’s Abbott Room. Pam Weeks, quilt historian and curator at the New England Quilt

Arts around the Mid-coast; June 2, 2011 An exhibit, “Diggin’ History — Piecing Together Pettengill Farm’s Past,” runs June 7 through Oct. 7 at the Freeport Historical Society’s Harrington House, 45 Main St. A bit more than one mile from global retailer LL Bean and the commerce

History: Major Horace M. Warren The Wakefield Historical Society upcoming exhibit will memorialize Warren in “South Reading in the War of the Rebellion,” opening on June 5th and continuing throughout the summer. Interested in a follow-up to this article

State Drinking Glasses & Beverages
The states in the union take great pride in their uniqueness and individuality. There are state birds, state colors, state flowers, state trees, state songs, state fish and even state mythical creatures. But who ever knew there were state beverages? Worthologist Liz Holderman, in her latest Dining with Antiques article, introduces a line of glasses made by Hazel-Atlas and hand-decorated by the Gay Fad Studios. And, as an added bonus, she provides recipes to two official state beverages you can try, if you’ve got some moxie. Read”State Drinking Glasses & Beverages”

Conference to focus on downtown revitalization, historic preservation The day will close with Maine Preservation’s annual Honor Awards. Skowhegan’s historic Strand Theater, featuring the announcement of Maine’s newest Main

Maine Conference on Downtowns to Focus on Reuse of Historic Structures Greg Paxton, executive director of Maine Preservation, and Roxanne Eflin of the Maine Downtown Center, took MPBN’s Irwin Gratz for a look at some of the

Juliana L’Heureux: Tribal historian praises book on Maine Indian It’s a modern history that delves into deeper issues, especially the who is Tribal Historic Preservation director in Indian Township, where he lives

Goat Island gets 1950s-era makeover Rachel H. Goldman – “And that part of history floated out to sea. Indian tribes of Maine, Maine Historical Preservation Commission and the town of Kennebunkport.

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, indians, Maine things to do, preservation, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rally for Norlands Civil War Re-enactment

Here are a few headlines and event notes from around the web for you Maine history buffs…

If you have an event or news to share please email me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com.

Antique English Tableware a Practical Collectible From Worthpoint
Are you looking for a line of antiques to begin a collection, but not quite sure where to start? Worthologist Wes Cowan suggests you take a look at British ceramics, which have the added benefit of enhancing your home. Wes introduces creamware, which can be easily found and are often priced for the novice collector. He also provides some tips on establishing a worthwhile and valuable collection. Read “Antique English Tableware a Practical Collectible”

Heritage Preservation Monitors Major Disasters

The 2011 Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1, and with flooding and tornadoes affecting much of the Southeast and Midwest, it is important to remember that a disaster can happen at any time. On behalf of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force, Heritage Preservation hosted an information gathering conference call in April with cultural and emergency contacts in the states affected by the recent rash of tornadoes and the Mississippi River crest. Heritage Preservation has also distributed a press release to local media outlets in the affected areas with simple object salvage tips for the public.

If a major disaster has occurred in your region, visit the Heritage Emergency National Task Force’s Information on Major DisastersWeb page for valuable contacts and response resources and to report damage to a cultural institution or collection. For a comprehensive list of preparedness resources to use before a disaster strikes, click here.

Headlines;

Alexander cemetery walk honors local civil war soldiers
Bangor Daily News John Dudley of the Alexander-Crawford Historical Society discusses the lives of Civil War veterans buried in the town cemetery during a Decoration Day walk Saturday at the cemetery. At his feet are cedar boughs, a traditional Decoration Day sentiment …

Appleton Historical Society to explore best nature sites
knox.VillageSoup.com Admission, as always, is free, and annual AHS dues are only $5. Light refreshments will be served after the evening’s presentation. July 11: Carolyn Brown will speak on Appleton history at Appleton Historical Society’s Union Meeting House. …

Vital vote: Limerick residents will decide if a bank can move the historic …
KeepMEcurrent.com And, Gooch said, one of the benefits of having an historic district is that it draws history buffs and the attention of agencies, like the Maine Development Foundation, which provide support for the preservation of historic buildings. …

Next Maine Event: Step into the early 1800s at Ancient Ones encampment Press Herald -The 200-year-old living history camp re-enactment is not simply to be observed … The Ancient Ones of Maine will assume historical personas at the park and …

LIVERMORE — The Third “Rally for Norlands” Civil War Re-enactment … Lewiston Sun Journal -The event is organized by the 3rd Maine Company A and 15th Alabama Company G to benefit the Washburn-Norlands Living History Center, Maine’s oldest living …

Seacoast exhibition explores history of wrecked vessels The Union Leader – White said newspapers from Portsmouth, Dover and Portland, Maine offered harrowing tales of rescues at New Castle. … state-historic-site.aspx.

Events;

CUSHING — Cushing Historical Society, 7:30 p.m. June 9, Hathorn Point Road. “Scrimshaw Techniques, Old and New” with master scrimshander Connie Bellet. Free and open to all.

SEARSPORT — Searsport Historical Society, 7 p.m. June 14, Curtis Hall, Church Street. Mrs. Charlene Knox Farris will speak on Captain Edwin Earle Greenlaw, Rockport native who married into a Searsport family and became one of town’s most notable citizens. Social period, refreshments to follow.

STOCKTON SPRINGS — Stockton Springs Historical Society, 1:30 p.m. June 5, society’s meeting rooms, Colcord House. program, “Stockton Men in the Civil War” with Jack Merrithew of Searsport.

THOMASTON — Thomaston Historical Society, 7 p.m. June 14, Knox Farmhouse and Museum, 80 Knox St. Guest speaker, antiques expert John D. Bottero. Bring one item for appraisal. Free and open to all.

WARREN — Warren Historical Society member Dick Ferren speaking about vintage wooden items in society’s collection, 7 p.m. June 7, Dr. Campbell House, 225 Main St. Refreshments. Bring wooden items for discussion, clarification or identification. 273-2726.

From the Maine Historical Society;

Online Exhibit: A Day for Remembering

America’s Memorial Day holiday has its roots in the post-Civil War era when survivors decorated the graves of those who had died in the war. Images of parades suggest the ways in which Maine communities have remembered veterans. Images of gravestones are reminders of the deceased’s contributions to life. The holiday is one that requires looking back to reflect on the ways in which past events and people have brought us to the present. View exhibit here.

Friday, June 3, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk at MHS: Celebrating the Longfellow Garden

Join Portland’s vibrant arts community during First Friday Art Walk. Mingle with friends, enjoy refreshments and music, and come see the current show in the Shettleworth Gallery, Images of the Longfellow Garden (May 6-June 30). This exhibit showcases historical images that document the evolution of the garden through the years. Then stroll through and enjoy the beauty and peacefulness of the Longfellow Garden. Details.

Saturday, June 4, 9am-12:30pm

MHS Annual Meeting: Looking (Back) at Television

Join us to conduct the official business of MHS. The annual meeting includes awards, the welcoming of new Trustees, and a talk by Fred Thompson, former head of the Maine Broadcasting System (1983-98), on the early days of television in Maine. Event registration required. Details.

Saturday, June 4, 1-3:30 pm

The Dave Astor Show Reunion

Featuring Dave Astor with Tony Boffa, Steve Romanoff, and Fred Thompson

Join us to remember and celebrate one of Maine’s best-loved homegrown television shows, The Dave Astor Show (For Teenagers Only). Spread the word, and bring your friends and memories! Details.

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, preservation, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pyrex Casseroles Postcards and May Baskets…

Dining with Antiques – Pyrex Casseroles
From Worthpoint…
OK, so you may have a collection of antique kitchenware taking up a lot of space. Worthologist Liz Holderman, in a new column called “Dining with Antiques,” will introduce various kitchen and dining antiques, their histories and, most interestingly, how you can continue to use these pieces for their intended purposes. Liz kicks off the column with a piece about that all-American cookware—Corning Pyrex casserole dishes—telling the story of how they started sporting different designs and even offers up a vintage recipe to cook up something that Grandma might have tried. Bon appétit. Read”Dining with Antiques – Pyrex Casseroles”

Photo archives featured by historical society
Incorporated in 1971, the Thomaston Historical Society was organized to collect, promote and preserve material that illustrates the history of Thomaston; and to make it accessible for those who wish to study it. The society maintains and operates a

Ex-Maine guard armory to become movie studio

A former Maine National Guard armory in South Portland is going to become a movie and television production studio and the developers hope to be able use it to entice more production companies to make movies in the state. The South Portland City Council voted unanimously…

Historic postcard images to be presented at Thomaston Historical Society

Kevin Johnson, photo archivist for the Penobscot Marine Museum in Searsport, will be the featured speaker at the Thomaston Historical Society at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 10, at the Knox Farmhouse & Museum, 80 Knox St. His program, “Greetings from Thomaston: Selections from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing…

From the Sail, Power and Steam Museum…

The Sail, Power and Steam Museum will fire up the first lime kiln in Rockland in almost 100 years Saturday, May 7. At one time, as many as 150 kilns burned limestone day and night on the shores of Penobscot Bay. Rockland was the lime capital of the world, with nearly 100 kilns along the harbor. Limestone burned in the kilns was shipped all over the world to make cement.

Lead by stonecutter Joe Auciello, volunteers at the museum have constructed a working model lime kiln at the museum. The kiln will be fired by wood and is fashioned just as the kilns built in the late 19th century were, complete with two fire boxes and a draw pit at the bottom to extract the cooked stone.

The fire boxes were provided by Dragon Cement Co. and stone was provided by George Hall & Son and trucked in by Spears. A cement foundation was provided by Ferraiolo Concrete Products.

The first test firing of the model kiln will take place 11 a.m to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 7. Since there will be a fire, a hot dog roast also is planned.

The Sail, Power and Steam Museum is at 75 Mechanic St. For more information on the event, call 701-7627 or email sharpadventures@att.net.

Help save schoolhouse at Mount Agamenticus

The Friends of Agamenticus Schoolhouse are pleased and gratified that the petition we circulated, which received more than 1100 certified signatures of York voters, will now have a chance to be acted upon at the spring town meeting. If approved, a fund of $200,000 would be made available for the preservation of the last remaining one room schoolhouse in the town.

From the Camden Lion Club…

Nostalgic film

The Camden Lions Club will present a nostalgic film clip from 1942 made by one of the members of the club at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 10, at the Camden Public Library. The film represents the town of Camden and nearby areas, with businesses and Lions Club members featured. Ken Libby shot the film in 1942 with a hand-held movie camera. Most of the clips are in black and white, but some are in color. Jack Williams narrates the film.

The film footage contains brief views of the Wadsworth Inn Tea Room, Packard’s Market, the 5 & 10, Marie’s Sweet Shop, Baldwin’s Dry Cleaners, the Simington Corner fire, the Lily Pond greenhouses and the downtown YMCA.

Robin Lee of the Camden Lions Club will host the evening. Bob Oxton will talk about the history of the star on Mt. Battie. Oxton and volunteers from the Lions Club install the star on the tower on Mt. Battie every Christmas season.

Home-baked refreshments will be provided by the Lions Club volunteers. The event is free and open to all.

Saturday gala aids Wolfe’s Neck Farm

FREEPORT — The annual spring gala and auction to benefit Wolfe’s Neck Farm will run from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday at the Harraseeket Inn.

From the Cushing Historical Society…

Historical society program

The Cushing Historical Society will host a program at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 12, at its meeting house on Hathorn Point Road. The program is free and open to all. Speakers will be Joe Villania and Paulo Carvalho, co-trustees of the Musical Wonder House Museum in Wiscasset, and Richard Delano, a docent at the museum. They will present a history of mechanical musical instruments and display and demonstrate several examples of music box machinery from their collection.

The museum features more than 5,000 restored music boxes, player grand pianos and organs, spring-wound phonographs, musical birds, porcelains, clocks, and several musical paintings, demonstrated and displayed in opulent rooms furnished with period antiques and housed in a 32-room 1852 sea captain’s mansion.

The museum is open to the public in season for guided presentations. The year-round,

onsite staff is available to assist with repairs, restorations and written appraisals.

For more information, visit www.musicalwonderhouse.com or call 354-0735.

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News from the Maine Historical Society

Online Exhibit:

May Day Amok: May Baskets, A Dog, and

A Party for Children

For many years the images in this exhibit, from McArthur Public Library in Biddeford, were believed to capture a party held to raise funds for World War I relief. In reality, the party was held by summer residents of Biddeford Pool to make amends to a group of local children who had been chased away as they tried to hang May baskets several months earlier. View the exhibit.

MHS News

First Maine Memory Network Grants Awarded

Nine communities were recently awarded grants for projects related to Maine Memory Network. All will receive extensive training and support designed to help them develop the capacity to share collections and stories online. Awards are made to organizations in three categories: Digitization projects: Winslow Historical Preservation Committee; Online Exhibits: Cary Library (Houlton), New England Electric Railway Historical Society (Kennebunkport), L.C. Bates Museum (Hinckley), Maine’s First Ship (Phippsburg), and Maine Island Trail Association (Little Chebeague Island); and Maine Community Heritage Projects: Surry, Strong, and Swan’s Island. The next grant deadline is September 1. Encourage organizations in your community to apply! For full details on the program, click here.

May Programs

The Longfellow House and Garden are open for the season!

Hours: Monday-Saturday: 10:30am-4pm and

Sunday: 12pm-4pm

(Tours leave on the hour. First tour Mon.-Sat. at 10:30am; first tour on Sun. at 12pm.)

___

Friday, May 6, 5 – 8pm
First Friday Art Walk: Opening for our new Lecture Hall Exhibit, Images of the Longfellow Garden. Details.

Saturday, May 7, 5 – 11pm
The Mad Hatter Affair: Dress up and enjoy the Kentucky Derby at MHS’s gala fundraiser. Details.

Saturday, May 14, 7:30am – 8pm
Genealogy Research Trip to Boston: Join us for a day of research at New England Historic Genealogical Society. Details.

Saturday, May 14
Maine Member Day: Your MHS membership provides free admission to museums across Maine. Details.

SAVE THE DATE:

Saturday, June 4

MHS Annual Meeting and Dave Astor Reunion Show!

Additional programs added regularly. Visit our website for the

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, grants, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, preservation, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dresden Dig Site Preserved

News headlines…

Camden Cake Walk: Treasure trove of sweets, community history A Mothers Day weekend collaboration of the Camden-Rockport Historical Society and 10 historic inns, the cake walk takes place Saturday, May 7from 1 to 4 pm, rain or shine. Earliest cake walks saw participants strutting or dancing, with the best winning…

Museum locates property Organizers of a living history museum aimed at showing how native Americans once lived in Maine have found property in Gardiner where they hopes to erect a permanent village…

Experts authenticate stone cross unearthed in remote Mahoosucs
Watercolorist Nainsi Muirin of County Magalloway reminds readers that according to Celtic legend, on the day a freestanding cross is set in place, evil will be gone within its view before sunset. With the rising of the next new moon, the reality of evil returns, and the future of the community… xxread more here

Maine Maritime Museum passes national muster
The Maine Maritime Museum on Monday announced it has achieved accreditation by the American Association of Museums, a designation the museum claimed is bestowed upon fewer than 5 percent of U.S. museums…

Deal preserves Dresden dig site
After nearly 25 years waiting at the gate — the last three of which involved heavy negotiations and deal-making among multiple parties — a Dresden property considered to be one of the most archaeologically significant sites in Maine is protected for research…

Work on Virginia replica to begin this summer
An organization that has long steered a course toward building a replica of the 1608 pinnace Virginia, believed to be the first English ship built in the New World, will begin construction this summer…

From our friends at Worthpoint…

Groans and Grins: Collecting Punny Postcards
Many postcard collectors have serious collections. They’re interested in preserving hometown history, amassing and cataloguing every postcard printed by a particular publisher or studying the changes in technology over time. But sometimes, postcards are just plain fun! Worthologist Bonnie Wilpon writes about some of the humorous cards she picked up for a little as 25¢ but still tickle the funny bone nearly 100 years later. Check out some of her punny postcards; they just may elicit a grin (or a groan)! Read”Groans and Grins: Collecting Punny Postcards”

Three-Mold Inkwells Highlight Vintage Bottle Auction
Three blown three-mold inkwells— each created sometime between 1815 and 1835 by Boston & Sandwich Glassworks —will highlight the upcoming Internet and catalog auction slated for April 29-May 7 by American Bottle Auctions. Among the other bottles that will surely gather attention is a collection of Western whiskey bottles and flasks and the only perfect example of a Julius Goldbaum known to exist. Find out more about an auction that’s sure to be a real corker. Read “Three-Mold Inkwells Highlight Vintage Bottle Auction”

May Happenings at the Museums of Old York…

Saturday April 30 and Sunday May 1; Before Tour of 2011 Decorator Show House

Come see historic “Emerson House” before it is transformed by a talented group of interior and landscape designers into our show house. Located at 31 Long Sands Road, Emerson House is a beautiful Georgian Colonial residence whose earliest roots date back to 1719. A special weekend open house will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday April 30 and Sunday May 1. Admission fee is $5. All proceeds support the museums’ education programs, exhibitions and preservation inititatives. Parking is available in the village and area lots. The Decorator Show House will run from July 16 through August 13, with an opening night reception planned for July 15. For more information, call the Museum office at 207-363-4974 or email
development@oldyork.org.

11 May Day Celebration

Join us for a traditional celebration of Spring! Build a tambourine, rattle, or drum and create a crown made from flowers and vines. Play your instrument and wear you crown as we parade around the gardens urging the flowers to blossom and bloom. Our parade will end at the May Pole where we’ll learn the traditional dance that weaves the long ribbons into a beautiful pattern of Spring colors. Do you play the fiddle or flute? Bring your instrument to play some tunes while we dance. Preregistration suggested. Everyone is welcome! Wednesday May 11, 3:00-5:00pm. $5 suggested donation. This event will take place at the Elizabeth Perkins House located just over Sewalls Bridge on Southside Rd.

13 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern

Celebrate spring with a hearth-cooked dinner of spring lamb and other seasonal favorite dishes. Guests are encouraged to bring their own favorite beverages to complement the meal. Friday, May 13, 6 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. $30 non-members and $25 members per person. Reservations required. For more information contact Richard Bowen or click here for menu.

21 Muskets, Swords, & Powder Horns

Observe Armed Forces Day at Old York. Back in 2011 after being received with great interest in 2010, this program will give enthusiasts of all ages the opportunity to view uniforms and weaponry from Old York’s collections. Certain items will be available to handle (with white curatorial gloves). Weapons from the 18th – 20th Centuries will be featured. Saturday, May 21, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Remick Barn.

4th Annual Old York Antiques Show

The 2010 Old York Antiques Show was a huge success and we plan to make 2011’s even better! This year’s show, which is a fundraiser to benefit the museums’ education programs, will be held September 10 – 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Museums of Old York Remick Barn Visitor Center, 3 Lindsay Road, with a preview party planned for September 9. For more information, call the Museum office at 207-363-4974 or email development@oldyork.org.

Categories: antiques, archeology, Art Exhibit, articles, breaking news, collectibles, Education, events, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, museum news, Museums of Old York, preservation, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Antique Appraisals & the Civil War in the News

Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions about Appraisals
Appraisers are often asked questions about how the appraisal process works and whether an appraisal is even needed. Worthologist Liz Holderman rounds up the most frequently asked questions (FAQs) and gives some quick and easy answers, including how an appraiser knows what your collection is worth, why appraisers need to know why you want an appraisal, whether your baseball-card collection is covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy and how the Internet changed the value of collectibles. See if your questions are answered here, and if not, ask away in the comments section. Liz will be glad to reply.Read “Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions about Appraisals”

Who fired first Civil War shot? A dispute in Fla.

A raid 150 years ago by Confederate sympathizers on a Union fort at what is now Pensacola Naval Air Station was likely little more than an ill-planned and drunken misadventure, perhaps ended by one soldier’s warning shot — and a blank one, at that. But don’t tell Pensacola residents that the Jan. 8, 1861, skirmish meant nothing — the event is the stuff of legend in this military town. Some even claim the clash was the Civil War’s first, three months before the battle on April 12, 1861, at South Carolina’s Fort Sumter, which is widely recognized as the start of the war. Dale Cox, the unofficial historian for the Florida Panhandle chapter of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, wrote on his blog that he considers the Pensacola shot the first of the Civil War, saying in an interview that it marked the first time federal troops fired toward Confederate agitators….

How We’ve Commemorated the Civil War

Take a look back at how Americans have remembered the civil war during significant anniversaries of the past… Read More »
also read;
The Civil War at 150 »

Poll: 4 in 10 Southerners Still Side With Confederacy

A century and a half after the opening shots of the U.S. Civil War, nearly four in 10 Southerners say they still sympathize with the Confederacy. That’s according to a new CNN poll released on the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, when Union soldiers raised a U.S. flag over Fort Sumter in South Carolina and the opening shots of the war rang out. The poll’s results reveal that the war that divided the nation for four years still divides American public opinion today. In the South, 38 percent of respondents said they sympathize with the Confederacy, which lost the bloody war. More than 600,000 American soldiers on both sides were killed. Overall, the number from all geographic areas who said they still side with the South is less than a quarter….

How Civil War Photography Changed War

Civil War photographers completely changed popular perceptions of modern warfare. We’ve all seen photographs of the Civil War: black-and-white images of bearded Union generals or mustachioed Confederate colonels posing to one side of the camera, dead bodies stacked on the battlefield or common soldiers around a camp tent. Looking back 150 years to the start of the Civil War this month, what impact did photography have on the war? On the people who lived during the time? What do these images tell us today about the soldiers and their families?

Historic Structures at Fort Davis National Historic Site Threatened by Major Wildfires

We’ve grown accustomed to media coverage of property threatened by raging wildfires in California, but… West Texas? Large fires that raced across the high desert last weekend caused major damage in the small town of Fort Davis. Thus far, the key historic structures at Fort Davis National Historic Site have escaped, but it’s been a close call, and fires continue to burn in the vicinity. Fort Davis National Historic Site preserves perhaps the best example of an Indian Wars’ frontier military post in the Southwest, and the rugged terrain adds to the fort’s appeal for modern-day visitors. That terrain, combined with severe drought and fierce winds, contributed to some of the worst fires in Texas history in recent days. Last weekend, the Rock House Fire burned over 108,000 acres in the region, including more than 106 acres of pinion-juniper, brush and grass in the higher elevation area of Fort Davis National Historic Site. The area affected is on the west side of the park, and includes land just acquired by the NPS in January….

Artifacts And Archives From Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Heading South For Safekeeping

Sometime this summer a truck, or trucks, loaded with artifacts and papers at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in Montana, will slowly pull away from the monument and set out on a 20-or-so-hour drive south. When the truck, or trucks, pull into the National Park Service’s Western Archaeological and Conservation Center in Tucscon, Arizona, workers will unload roughly 150,000 artifacts and archives tied in some fashion to the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry’s darkest days in June 1876…

Reenactments Highlight Fort Sumter Battle Anniversary Commemoration

One hundred and fifty years ago this Tuesday, April 12, the first salvos of the Civil War were launched when Confederate forces began a 34-hour bombardment that ended with the surrender of Fort Sumter. “The firing upon that fort will inaugurate a civil war greater than any the world has yet seen,” declared Robert Toombs, Confederate secretary of state, not long before the conflict began. Despite the lack of fatalities (except for two that a surrender ceremony accident produced), the siege on the Union fort on Charleston Harbor in South Carolina commenced

4 ways we’re still fighting the Civil War

He stood 5-foot-8 and weighed 145 pounds. His face was gaunt and sunburned. Ticks, fleas and lice covered his body. Before battle, his lips would quiver and his body went numb. When the shooting started, some of his comrades burst into maniacal laughter. Others bit the throat and ears of their enemy. And some were shattered by shells so powerful that tufts of their hair stuck to rocks and trees. Take a tour of a Civil War battlefield today, and it’s difficult to connect the terrifying experience of an average Civil War soldier — described above from various historical accounts — with the tranquil historic sites where we now snap pictures today. But you don’t have to tour a battlefield to understand the Civil War. Look at today’s headlines. As the nation commemorates the 150th anniversary of its deadliest war this week, some historians say we’re still fighting over some of the same issues that fueled the Civil War.

Maine’s historic churches presentation May 4

Union Historical Society will present a program on “Maine’s Historic Churches” on Wednesday May 4 at 7:30 pm in the Old Town House, Town House Road, Union. Christi A. Mitchell, architectural historian with the Maine Historic Preservation …

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A Haunted Maine Fort?

Maine Fort to be Featured on TV Ghost Show Maine’s Fort Knox is going to be featured on a TV program about ghosts. The Department of Conservation says stars of SyFy Channel’s program “Ghost Hunters” will reveal their findings next Wednesday about whether the fort along the Penobscot River near Bucksport is haunted. State park historian Tom Desjardin says it’ll be nice to see Fort Knox presented on the national stage. Desjardin says there are no official reports of haunting at Fort Knox, and only three soldiers on record died while at the fort….

Mementos of a Royal Hawaiian Love Story A matched set of silver goblets. A great golden bed. A marvelous and mysterious hand-stitched quilt of a unique design not found in the index of the Hawaiian Quilt Research Project. These are the mementos of one of Hawaii’s great love stories between a young man with royal Hawaiian blood in his veins and a hula dancer. The two young people, both famous in their own way, seemed fated for each other, and in the end, spent the rest of their lives together. View some of the items that help to tell this Hollywood-like Honolulu love story. Read “Mementos of a Royal Hawaiian Love Story”

Finding history in a rocking chair The first time, she had a desk and chair from the Maine Senate that were given … the Caribou Historical Society who might have an interest in my treasure. …

Wabanaki culture, history explored Colonial-era Wabanaki culture and history will be spotlighted Sunday, April 10 at the Camden-Rockport Historical Society’s next Maine Living talk. …

Tuesday’s Calendar — April 5 Anson Historical Society, 6:30 pm, Anson town meeting room; All are welcome. … a licensed Maine falconer will speak about the life history and ecology of …

Et Cetera: Listings Fundraising Card Party, benefits Falmouth Historical Society, Holy Martyrs Church, … 10 am to 1 pm “Horse-Drawn Vehicles in Maine,” slide presentation and …

Historical society creates craft fund to honor member The Bethel Historical Society’s board of trustees voted unanimously and preserve traditional crafts relating to the history of western Maine,

The Civil War: 01 April 1861 to 09 April 1861

April 3.—Dispatches were received in “Washington to-day, confirming the reported reinforcement of Fort Pickens; and the Cabinet held a long session, without coming to any definite conclusion in regard to the long-mooted evacuation of Fort Sumter. One company of artillery left Washington for Fort Hamilton, and two more are to follow to-morrow. Unwanted activity also prevails in the navy, several vessels being rapidly fitted for service. — World, April 4.

—The mortar batteries on Morris’ Island, Charleston harbor, fired into an unknown schooner. She displayed the stars and stripes, and put to sea. A boat from Sumter with a white flag went out to her; nobody hurt. A shot had gone through her.—{Doc. 49.)

—All officers of the Southern Confederate army, on leave of absence, were ordered to their respective commands.—Times, April 5.

—The South Carolina Convention ratified the Constitution of the Confederate States, by a vote of 114 to 10.—Tribune, April 0.

—The Charleston correspondent writes: “By the by, let us never surrender to the North the noble song, the ‘Star-Spangled Banner.’ It is southern in its origin; in sentiments, poetry and song; in its association with chivalrous deeds, it is ours; and the time, I trust, is not remote, when the broad stripes and brilliant stars of the confederate flag of the South will wave triumphantly over our capitol, Fortress Monroe, and every fort within our borders.”—Richmond Examiner.

April 4.—The Virginia Convention adopted, in committee of the whole, several of the series of resolutions reported by the majority of the Committee on Federal Relations, and rejected, by the decisive veto of 89 to 45, a motion to substitute for one of the resolutions an ordinance of secession, to be submitted to the popular vote.— World, April 5.

—Many rumors are in circulation to-day.

They appear to have originated from movements on the part of the United States troops, the reasons for which have not been communicated to the reporters at Washington as freely as the late Administration was in the habit of imparting Cabinet secrets. There can be no doubt that serious movements are on foot. The tone of the southern press for the last week, and the concentration of troops at Pensacola, indicate a determination to precipitate a conflict at Fort Pickens, probably with a view to hasten the secession movement in Virginia.—Tribune, April 5.

April 7.—General Beauregard issued an order, and sent a special messenger to Major Anderson, to give him an official notification that no further intercourse between Fort Sumter and the city would be permitted. — Times, April 9.

—The steam transport Atlantic sailed under sealed orders from New York, laden with troops and provisions. Among the troops is Captain Barry’s celebrated company of United States Flying Artillery. — Commercial Advertiser, April 8.

April 8.—Information having been given by the United States authorities to the authorities at Charleston that they desired to send supplies to Fort Sumter by an unarmed vessel, they were informed that the vessel would be fired upon and not permitted to enter the port. Official notification was then given by the United States Government that supplies would be sent to Major Anderson, peaceably if possible, otherwise by force. Lieutenant Talbot, attached to the garrison of Fort Sumter, and who accompanied the bearer of this dispatch, was not permitted to proceed to his post.

—Orders were issued to the entire military force of Charleston, held in reserve, to proceed to their stations without delay. Four regiments of a thousand men each were telegraphed for from the country.

Dr. Gibbs, surgeon-general, was ordered to prepare ambulances, and make every provision for the wounded.

—At midnight Charleston was thrown into great excitement by the discharge of seven guns from Citadel square, the signal for all the reserves to assemble ten minutes afterwards.

Hundreds of men left their beds, hurrying to and fro towards their respective destinations.

In the absence of sufficient armories, at the corners of the streets, public squares, and other convenient points, meetings were formed, and all night the long roll of the drum and the steady tramp of the military, and the gallop of the cavalry resounding through the city, betokened the close proximity of the long-anticipated hostilities. The Home Guard corps of old gentlemen, who occupy the position of military exempts, rode through the city, arousing the soldiers, and doing other duty required by the moment.

United States vessels were reported off the bar. Major Anderson displayed signal lights during the night from the walls of Fort Sumter.—Times, April 10.

—The State Department at Washington replied to-day to the Confederate State Commissioners, declining to receive them in their official capacity, but expressing deference for them as gentlemen. The Secretary expressed a peaceful policy on the part of the Government, declaring a purpose to defend only when assailed. — Tribune, April 9.

April 9.—Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania, sent a special message to the Legislature to-day, urging the necessity of purchasing arms and reorganizing the military system of that State. —Times, April 10.

—Jefferson Davis made a requisition on the Governor of Alabama for 3,000 soldiers. — Tribune, April 10.

—The Charleston Mercury of to-day announces war as declared. “Our authorities,” it says, “yesterday evening received notice from Lincoln’s Government, through a special messenger from Washington, that an effort will be made to supply Fort Sumter with provisions and that if this were permitted, no attempt would be made to reinforce it with men! This message comes simultaneously with a fleet, which we understand is now off our bar, waiting for daylight and tide to make the effort threatened.

“We have patiently submitted to the insolent military domination of a handful of men in our bay for over three months after the declaration of our independence of the United States. The object of that self humiliation has been to avoid the effusion of blood, while such preparation was made as to render it causeless and useless.

“It seems we have been unable, by discretion, forbearance, and preparation, to effect the desired object, and that now the issue of battle is to be forced upon us. The gage is thrown down, and we accept the challenge. We will meet the invader, and the God of Battles must decide the issue between the hostile hirelings of Abolition hate and Northern tyranny, and the people of South Carolina defending their freedom and their homes. We hope such a blow will be struck in behalf of the South, that Sumter and Charleston harbor will be remembered at the North as long as they exist as a people.”

—Steamers Illinois and Baltic, in commission for United States Government, got to sea from New York. They discharged their pilots at 7.30 A. M., and sailed southwardly.—{Doc. 60.)

—United States sloop-of-war Pawnee sailed from Norfolk at 6 P. M., with sealed orders. — Times, April 11.

Next week- the battle begins with the bombing of Fort Sumter on 12 April, 1861 at 04:30 AM from Fort Moultrie, and assorted batteries joining in…

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Gold Prices and Opera Houses

If your historical society or genealogy organization has news to share, an event scheduled, or other information you’d like to share here, please email the info to editor@touringmaineshistory.com
More news and events from the world of Maine history…
Gold Prices Endanger Antique Watches The value of gold and silver has been rising as the Great Recession has dragged on, and Worthologist David Mycko says this is bringing on the demise of literally thousands of gold and silver antiques and collectibles of all nature. But watches, he says, have been hit particularly hard. As a watchmaker and collector, this pains David more than others. He gives one example of a perfectly fine antique watch whose days could be numbered before it is melted down and sold for its gold value. Read “Gold Prices Endanger Antique Watches”
Boothbay Opera House: Fixing up the old gal
The old Opera House has never looked better. Especially when you realize she has passed her 117th birthday.
She closed this winter to allow local workers and volunteers to do a bit of fixing up, including installing a new heating system, patching a few leaks and holes, adding a new (old) floor, new seats, sound system, seating, balcony railing, painting and so on, and so on, to the tune of more than $400,000.
Castine eyes repairs to Emerson Hall
Town officials have hired an architect to conduct an assessment of Emerson Hall in an effort to determine what repairs might be necessary for the 110-year-old building to continue serving as town hall. There are obvious signs both inside and outside the building, according to Town Manager …
State pledges $1 million for 2014 World Acadian Congress
Organizers of the World Acadian Congress, who believe the event will bring a huge economic boost to Aroostook County and parts of Canada in 2014, are steaming forward with their plans after learning that the state will commit $1 million to the festivities over the next …
Augers named to Franco hall of fame
Gilles Auger has been creating a database of Franco-Americans who came to Sanford from Quebec to work in the mills. As he records those who came and their relations in Quebec and elsewhere, the database has grown to 80,000 names. As well, he reads a half-dozen French language newspapers daily on the Internet, especially the ones from Montreal, Quebec City and Sherbrooke, and while he’s keeping up with the news, he checks for familiar names.
Opera House gets grants, a third of the way to goal
FUNDS NEEDED — The Opera House in Norway. The Opera House Corporation needs to raise an additional $127,500 in order to pay for the stabilization work.
Woodland Margins; Georgetown Historical Society Spring Exhibit
The opening reception and artists talk will be on Firday, 1 April from 4 to 6 PM and the open house will be Saturday, 2 April, from 10 AM to Noon. The exhibit will run until 15 June. The GHS is open at no charge on Wednesdays from 10AM to 5PM. FMI: http://www.georgetownhistoricalsociety.org/ or call them at 207-371-9200.
From the Maine Historical Society;
Sardine packers, Lubec, ca. 1976
Community Website:
Lubec’s history reflects its close ties to the sea and its proximity to New Brunswick. Many stories from that history–including the rise and fall of the sardine industry and tales of smugglers, the American Revolution, and life around Passamaquoddy Bay–are captured in this rich website built and maintained by community members from the Lubec Historical Society, Lubec Memorial Library, Lubec Landmarks, and Lubec Consolidated School. 2011 marks the town’s bicentennial. Read more and explore the website.
Friday, April 1, 5-8 PM
Music, refreshments, and two exhibits: Zoom-In: New Approaches to Maine History (through May 29) and Arts, Artists and Personalities in 1930s Maine (through May 3). More info.
Sunday, April 3, 10 AM-4 PM
Discovering Maine’s Jewish History
The 2nd Maine Jewish History Conference
Location: Roberts Union, Colby College
Explore the richness of Jewish life in Maine at a day-long conference featuring talks, panels, and workshops presented by community, professional, and student historians. Learn about early Jews in Lewiston, Jewish back-to-the-landers, anti-semitism in Portland, openness in Eastport, communal life in Old Town, social life in Old Orchard Beach, and much more. Leading scholars will place the experiences of Maine’s Jews within the broader context of American Jewish history. Registration required (includes lunch and materials). Download the registration form. Presented by Colby College with Maine Historical Society and Documenting Old Maine Jewry. For more information, please visit: http://web.colby.edu/jewsinmaine/
Thursday, April 7, 7 PM
In partnership with Maine Humanities Council
Facilitator:
Emerson Baker, Professor of History, Salem State College
Join us for an exploration of Arundel, Kenneth Roberts’ fictional account of Benedict Arnold’s march through Maine to Québec during the American Revolution. This event is free but registration is required. For more information or to register, please visit the Maine Humanities Council’s website or call MHC at 207-773-5051.
Categories: Acadian history, antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

L.C. Bates Museum

We have a new link to share with you all to the L.C. Bates Museum, located on the Goodwill-Hinckley School grounds on route 201 in Hinckley. If you’ve driven from Waterville to Skowhegan, you’ve driven right by this stately looking building. I haven’t been up to see them, but hope to do so this year. There are simply too many things going on for me to get to them all, unfortunately. But here’s a brief run down of what they offer up there:

Their websites intro says; The L. C. Bates Museum at Good Will-Hinckley is an early 20th century natural history and cultural museum. It is housed in an historic 1903 Romanesque Revival brick school building. Museum exhibits include Maine natural history, Americana, art, archaeology, minerals, ethnology, and Maine history. Featured museum exhibit tells the history of Good Will-Hinckley and the children who called it home.

 There are nature trails, picnic tables, and an arboretum behind the museum.

 Summer Art Exhibits are held in the museum. Saturdays features Family and Children’s natural history and history workshops and hikes. The Museum offers Outreach and In-House Natural History and Maine History programs for schools and groups and programs for birthday parties
and
scouts.

Here’s the rest of the main story from their front page:

Admission: Adults $3.00, Children up to 17 years $1.00

Open hours: Spring, Summer and Autumn Hours (April until mid-November):

Weds, Thurs, Fri and Sat 10 AM to 4:30PM and Sunday 1 to 4:30 PM and other times by appointment.

 
 

Winter Hours (mid-Nov – March) – Wednesday through Saturday 10AM to 4:30PM and other times by appointment or chance, please call 238-4250

to be sure we are here to greet you in winter. Closed if the roads are snowy. Please note we are not heated in winter! Dress warmly if you come for a visit.

  
 

Self-Guided Outdoor Activities:

Good Will-Hinckley Nature Trails Start Behind the Museum Self-Guided Trail Maps, Children’s Outdoor Discovery Packs, and Museum Animal Discovery Boxes, are available at the museum

Picnic Tables in Arboretum- Carry/In Carry/out

 
 

Museum Gift Shop: Open museum hours. The gift shop features many educational items for curious adults and children, including puppets, books, jewelry, posters,

and natural items such as minerals, shells and fossils. The gift shop has a wide range of prices including 1$ dollar items to allow kids and school groups to shop too!

 
 

Membership and Volunteering: We welcome new museum memberships and volunteers to have fun, share their knowledge and learn while making the L.C.Bates Museum available to central Maine Community. If you have a special interest or talent, please inquire about volunteering.

 
 

The L.C.Bates Museum is located 5 miles north of I 95 exit 133 on Rt. 201halfway between Skowhegan and Fairfield.

 
 

Contact Information

L. C. Bates Museum

At Good Will-Hinckley

Rt 201, PO Box 159, Hinckley, ME 04944

207-238-4250- E-mail- lcbates@gwh.org 

Try to visit and support them if you can, or at the very least check out the web site here. Who knows, maybe you’ll get some vacation ideas for this summer’s fun?

If you have a society, museum or other non-profit history related website and would like to have a link placed in our directory, simply drop me an email at editor@touringmaineshistory.com. As a reminder, I’m planning on beginning a series of highlights of Maine historical organizations, so if you’d like to be in on that project let me know at the same address. And if you have a for profit venue, I’m currently examining advertising possibilities as well.

Categories: antiques, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine things to do, museum news, preservation, restoration, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maine History News for Sunday, February 20, 2011

More news and headlines from Maine’s world of history! Winter is pretty dull up here in Maine, historically speaking, but there’s still lot’s going on around the state. Fortunately, we’re only a few short weeks away from the unofficial start of mud season and the restarting of many of our historical society’s seasonal cycles. I’m hoping to be able to get in a lot more time around the state this year and finally get Touring Maine’s History running at the speed I’d like it to be at. If you or your society has news or events to share, feel free to e-mail them to me at dlsoucy@touringmaineshistory.com, and please check out our website at www.touringmaineshistory.com. Time is still somewhat restrictive, so I intend to do one weekly post every Sunday of these news headlines and event calendars, so try to get your info in to me by Saturday evening if you can.

I’m also planning on doing a series of historical society highlights later on this year which will be a good promotional tool if you’d like to be included.

Franco genealogical library looking for new home

AUBURN — Normand Angers doesn’t seem surprised that the Maine Franco-American Genealogical Society has to find a new home after 10 years.  He’s matter-of-fact about it. “We just need a place to go, and as soon as possible,” Angers, president of the library, said…

Ice or snow, to market we will go

Sarcophagus, anyone? Itchy for antiquity? Though it’s no longer there, for many months you and your forklift could have scooped one up at Brunswick’s Waterfront Flea Market, despite the cold outside. How about a pair of mint-condition grey suede chaps – with fringe (hi-ho…

Save Teaching American History Grants–Contact Your Senator Now!

The National Coalition for History is asking you to email letters to your U.S. Senators as soon as possible urging them to save the Teaching American History (TAH) Grants Program and Civic Education funding (through competitive grants).…Legislation is currently being drafted in the Senate that would fund federal programs for the rest of this fiscal year, FY 2011. It is absolutely vital that our members send emails as soon as possible to save TAH and Civics funding in FY’11. We will be sending a separate sample letter regarding FY’12 appropriations and the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) later this spring….

Portrait of the past Retired Maine doctor digs into the past…

Dr. Newell Augur is a retired gastroenterologist from Portland – the one in Maine. He’s also a bit of a history buff. It’s easy to understand why.

Winter Lyceum returns to Left Bank

‎According to Belfast Historical Society President Megan Pinette, “Becoming Teddy Roosevelt,” and will explore Maine’s influence on Teddy Roosevelt

‘Clam wars’ specter haunts border dispute testimony

‎LD 69, “An Act To Restore the Historical Town Boundary between Harpswell and gained approval by the Maine Legislature — should have settled once and for

 

 

News from the Penobscot Marine Museum…

New Stubbs Paintings for Collection;

The recent addition of two new paintings brings PMM’s permanent collection of works by artist William Pierce Stubbs to 15. The son of shipmaster Reuben Stubbs, William was born in Orrington, Maine, in 1842. He commanded a ship from 1863 to 1873, but began painting ship’s portraits in 1871. He moved to Boston in 1876 and set up a studio, mainly producing marine portraits. William Stubbs died in 1909….

“Main Streets” Photos Come to Penobscot County

“Main Street, Maine,” PMM’s popular traveling exhibit of vintage photographs, is on display at the Newport Cultural Center through

May 3….The show features dozens of 75- to 100-year-old images from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. Collection. Many of them show Main Streets when the modern townscape was evolving, with transportation shifting from unpaved roads and horses to paved roads and automobiles. Captions for the exhibit were written by Maine State Historian, Earle Shettleworth….

Save the Date! 
    When: April 2, 2011
    What: ART PARTY
Please set aside the evening of April 2nd for a benefit dinner to be held at the Museums of Old York’s Remick Barn and Jefferds Tavern. We are planning a festive and artistic dinner party as a means of raising funds for the on going upkeep and needed repairs of the George Marshall Store.

 
 

As one of the properties owned and maintained by the Museums of Old York, the Store has been used as a contemporary art gallery for the past 15 years. So many people have told me how much they enjoy the gallery and its idyllic setting. It is my hope that people’s enthusiasm for this special place will result in a successful and fun fund raising event.

 
 

An invitation by mail will follow shortly but in the meantime mark your calendar for ART PARTY!

Many thanks,

Mary Harding

Curator, George Marshall Store Gallery

Museums of Old York

Tel: (207) 351-1083
140 Lindsay Road, York Maine
mhardingart@gmail.com

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, Geneology, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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