breaking news

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

Note: If you have problems with the links, simply cut/copy and paste into your browser to open them.

Adelbert Ames and His Recollection of the Attempted Robbery in Northfield

Adelbert Ames was born in Rockland, ME, on Oct. 31, 1835. He graduated West Point Academy in 1861 and was commissioned to the 2nd U.S. Artillery and fought in the First Battle of Bull Run where he earned the Medal of Honor. He was later reassigned to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862 where he fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg…

Hurricanes of New England
Maps are available at the Weare Historical Society if you’d like to walk through … on record as the costliest and deadliest storm in New England history…

Old house requires special, loving care
I have had the privilege of … In the end, they offered the house to the Norway Historical Society…

Audience Calendar
Illustrated Lecture: History of Silk in America, Nancy Greenleaf and Sally Williams, Hiram Historical Society, free. 625-4762. 2:30 pm Saturday. …

Bangor Museum and History Center getting a museum makeover
A week after selling a rare … And with the Massachusetts Historical Society, which already has volumes one …

Three Chums tell tales of friendship at Lovell’s Brick Church Sept. 9
Gilman, a New Hampshire storyteller who periodically wanders into Maine… Baked Bean Awareness Month speaker for the Fryeburg Historical Society. …

Prospect News
The Prospect Historical Society will hold a meeting Sept.12th. in the Town Hall at 7:00 PM. Will be discussing the final Yard Sale at the Marsh School…

Publication on Dover-Foxcroft will be a genealogist’s treasure
The couple has long been involved with the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society and its home at the Observer building. Nancy is former president of MGS, and Jack is the current president. The Maine Genealogical Society produces its special publications …

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

It has taken more than 10 years, but recent place name changes approved by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names have removed the final racial slurs from Maine maps. The six locations, all in Aroostook County, are now named Scopan, Scopan Inlet, Scopan Knob, Scopan Lake, …

Archaeologists in Illinois dig to find civilization that vanished

The largest excavation of a prehistoric site in the country is poised to solve a riddle about Illinois prehistory that has lingered for a century — where did the Mississippians go? And why? An enormous dig of a village site first inhabited about 1050 A.D. is providing so much data and so many artifacts that archaeologists are daring to speculate that basic questions about the Mississippians will finally be answered.

~~~

From Museums of Old York:

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

PLEASE NOTE:
The “History Challenge” programs previously scheduled for Thursday, September 1 and Thursday, September 8 at 7 p.m. in The Parsons Center have been cancelled.
Our regular programming and exhibits in The Parsons Center will be suspended from September 1 through September 11 so that we may bring you The Fourth Annual Antiques Show!

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

19 “The Country Heer is Plentiful” exhibit of Trade, Religion and Warfare and Southern Maine 1631-1745 resumes in the upstairs gallery at The Parsons Center during regular museum hours.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Click here to view the scrumptious menu on our website. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany the hearth-cooked meal. Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Seating is limited to twenty and reservations are required. Please email Richard Bowen or call (207) 363-4974 to make your reservation by September 21.

26 Needle Wizards. Every Monday morning starting the 26th of September. Join our Needle Wizards as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information email Cindi at registrar@oldyork.org.

29 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

October

3 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apple, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Remick Barn. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. $5 for teens and adults/ $15 for families. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

31 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

~~~

From the Maine Historical Society:

MHS News

New Exhibit Explores One Way High Fashion Came to Maine

The new exhibit in the Lecture Hall Gallery, “Having in Paris a Great Success”: French Fashion, 1928-1936, features sheets from Paris fashion houses that demonstrate one source of fashion inspiration for well-to-do women in Maine during the 1920s and 30s. The sheets, which are drawn from MHS’s Mildred G. Burrage Collection, include beautiful hand-drawn illustrations of the latest styles and fabric samples.

This show is mounted in conjunction with Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In, our current museum exhibit.


Fall Program Highlights

Tuesday, October 4, 12pm
Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Thursday, October 13, 7pm
Book Event: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm
Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Wednesday, October 26, 7pm

Book Event: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Presenter: Colin Woodard, Author

Thursday, November 10, 7pm
In Partnership with the Colonial Dames in Maine
Tales from an Art Detective: Tracing Nazi-era Provenance at the MFA

Presenter: Victoria Reed, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Categories: antiques, archeology, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, indians, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ponce’s Landing, Long Island

Headlines and articles on Maine history news

Historic Town House to hold unveiling ceremony in Dixmont

DIXMONT, Maine — An unveiling ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, at the historic Dixmont Town House, 702 Western Avenue in Dixmont. A historic marker recently was provided and installed at the Dixmont Town House by Central Maine Power Co. The Dixmont Historical Society invites the public to attend the ceremonies. Refreshments will be served. The Town House will be open to view the work that has been done to save the historic building, and members of the Historical Society Committee will be on hand to discuss future plans. For more information, call 234-2271.

Chamberlain Days kicks off Thursday
BRUNSWICK — The Pejepscot Historical Society will sponsor Chamberlain Days, a series of lectures, workshops, and other Civil War related programs for the general public. Programming begins at 7 pm Thursday in the Morrell Meeting Room at Curtis…

Holy History! Churches share stories
The editors were made up of people who had writing skills as well as a knowledge of local history, said historical society Member Sallie Huot, who was one of the editors, as well as the writer of the chapter on the history of Trinity Episcopal Church…

Work of 1800s itinerant artist focus of talk, tours
These are the pastoral views painted on the walls of local historic homes by artist Rufus Porter. History buffs and art admirers attended the Aug. 6 Townsend Historical Society “Porter Landscape School Murals: a Talk and Tour,” led by Rufus Porter…

Historic Orono mill torn asunder as town makes way for condo project

ORONO, Maine — When an excavator’s grapple peeled part of the roof off the old Webster Mill on Monday evening, the crowd that had gathered to watch the demolition of the more than 130-year-old building let out a cheer. The cheers grew louder when the grapple came down on the…

‘Sacred ground’ of Popham settlement commands archaeologist’s attention

PHIPPSBURG, Maine — Dr. Jeffrey Brain sat on a boulder at the edge of a nondescript field near the mouth of the Kennebec River, enjoying the view. Fishing boats puttered by in the swirling currents, cutting through blazes of sunshine cast up by the rippling water. A clam harvester donning…

An island prison: Rugged St. Croix Island brought ghastly death to early settlers

Editor’s Note: This is the first of three stories examining Maine’s historic role in the settling of the New World. The other two parts will run Monday and Tuesday. ROBBINSTON, Maine — When French settlers set out to claim parts of the New World at the turn of the 17th…

States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards
Looking for a fun collection that won’t break the bank or something for your children to collect? Worthologist Bonnie Wilpon says that one collection that’s easy to start while on vacation is state humor postcards, which can be found in gas stations, restaurants, hotels, airports and local shops, in addition to postcard shows and on online collecting sites for when you get back home. While every state likes to poke fun at itself and its residents, there are some jokes that transcend state boarders: Can you guess what “bird” is claimed by 30 different states as their “official” winged denizen? Bonnie will show you some examples. Read “States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards”

‘Clipperways’ to be razed

The 113-year-old home has been called ‘the jewel of Prouts Neck.’ The new owner will build another house…

Museum News:

Museums of Old York

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

August

19, 26 Hearth Cooking Demonstrations. Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th-century recipes and techniques over the open fire. Stop in Fridays around 3:00 p.m. to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museum buildings.

25 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of areas outside the village proper. Email Richard Bowen for more information.
23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany their hearth-cooked meal.Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Reservations required. Email Richard Bowen for more information.

29 History Brought to Life. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates. See above for more info.

October

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. Thursday, October 6, 7 p.m. Remick Barn.
15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Remick Barn Visitors Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the Remick Barn at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween. For the third year in a row, Old York invites you to meet the ghosts of the long-departed residents of the local area. Look for details in September. Saturday, October 29, 6 – 8 p.m.

Maine Historical Society


Monday-Friday, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: Innocent Interlude, Scenes of Life in Portland, Maine 1940-41

Take a tour of Portland in the early 1940s through this remarkable series of color films made by city officials. (60 minutes) More info

Wednesday, August 24, 11am

Family Tour of the Wadsworth-Longfellow House More info

Thursday, August 25, 11am

The Longfellow Trail: An Urban Expedition: Guided walking tour through downtown Portland More info

Saturday, August 27, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: The Dave Astor Show Visits Jordan’s Meats

In this episode recorded in 1962 (the only episode of the Dave Astor Show that still exists), Dave and his students celebrate the opening of the new Jordan’s Meats plant in Portland with song, dance, and lots of fun. (60 minutes) More info

Penobscot marine Museum

Greetings From Hampden: Selections from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Collection: Slide talk by Kevin Johnson, Photo Archivist. Sponsored by Hampden Historical Society. At Kinsley House, 83 Main Rd., So. Hampden, ME. For more information: hampdenmaine.com or 207-862-2027, Aug. 22, 7 p.m.

Historic Photos of Jonesport: Kevin Johnson will show historic images of Jonesport and environs from the Eastern Illustrating Collection. At Peabody Memorial Library, 162 Main Street, Jonesport, ME. For more information: 207-497-5644. Aug. 25, 7 p.m.

Shadowbox Workshop: Learn how to make dioramas inspired by the work of Anne-Emmanuelle Marpeau. At the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine. To register, contact Susan Henkel: 207-548-2529 ext.202. Sept. 17, 9 a.m.

And We’ll Be Exhibiting at:

Belfast Harbor Fest, Aug. 20

Camden Windjammer Festival, Sept. 2-4

Common Ground Fair, Sept. 23-25

~~~

Today’s postcard pick shows both Ponce’s and Trefethen’s Landing on Long Island, just outside Portland Harbor. Roberta Gomez Ricker has a story called At the Base of Ponce’s Landing in our new book, Salt & Pines, available through your local bookseller or online at History Press. It is a fine story that describes not only some of the hardships island living presents, but some of the joys life on one of Maine’s islands can bring as well. Islanders are a special kind of people, and this story will help at least one tale live on when all else has been forgotten. You may have caught the piece on the book in this past Sunday’s Portland Press’ Audience section, but if not head on over and check it out here. Volume two is just about ready to go, with just some minor editing and image placements remaining, and I’m currently accepting submissions for volume three. If you’d like to learn more, email your questions to me at editor@remembermemedia.com

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Katahdin

Southern Maine town restores 1-room schoolhouse | The Republic
In 2006, it was donated to the Waterborough Historical Society. Resident Teresa Lowell, who attended Saturday’s rededication, tells the Journal Tribune that “it just gives you goose bumps” to think of the children at their desks…

New exhibits on display at Brooks Historical Society’s open house
VillageSoup Belfast
This one features places, many in Maine. If you are really interested in Brooks’ history, come look through notebooks entitled “Dow Family Papers’ and “Hiram Pilley Papers.” Hiram was a shoemaker, who bought many of his supplies from Colburn Shoe Store…

Book captures cities’ church histories
KeepMEcurrent.com
SACO – Residents of Saco may be surprised to learn that the first Salvation Army presence in Maine was in the city and that the Jewish…

Dixfield Historical Society holding flower festival
Lewiston Sun Journal
DIXFIELD — The Dixfield Historical Society’s annual Festival of Flowers, open to western Maine flower lovers and the visiting public, will be held on Sunday, Aug. 21, in the Dixfield Historical Society’s Charter Meeting Room…

Katahdin

By Ann Blalack

I thought I would share this piece of original artwork from Bangor’s Ann Blalack. It is an ink and pastel on paper rendition of a canoeist on Katahdin Lake, with Mount Katahdin in the background. The image was selected to be placed in the First volume of Salt & Pines, and is shown in the book in black and white on page 159. To see more Maine images and read the stories about Maine’s bygone days you can pick up the book through your local retailer, my Amazon page or directly through History Press.

Katahdin is a place of much wonder and history in the state of Maine, and in the past has been the center of aboriginal superstition as it was supposed to be the home of Pomoola, or the Indian devil, thought to haunt the woods of Maine and was the cause of much of the Indian origin stories. It is a long story with much to share, so dig in and learn some of Maine’s history.

Maine Historical Society News:

This Week

Beat the Heat: Movies at MHS

Saturday, August 20, 2pm

The Dave Astor Show Visits Jordan’s Meats

In this episode recorded in 1962 (the only episode of the Dave Astor Show that still exists), Dave and his students celebrate the opening of the new Jordan’s Meats plant in Portland with song, dance, and lots of fun. (60 minutes)

Daily, Monday-Friday, 2pm

Innocent Interlude, Scenes of Life in Portland, Maine 1940-41

Take an amazing tour of Portland in the early 1940s through this remarkable series of color films made by city officials. (60 minutes)

Screenings are held in our air-conditioned lecture hall. Ticket price included with museum or house admission. Details online.

Family Programs at MHS

Wednesdays at 11am, through August 31

The Children’s Hour: Family Tours of the Wadsworth-Longfellow House

Thursdays at 11am, through August 25

The Longfellow Trail: An Urban Expedition: Guided walking tour through downtown Portland.

Details online.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Lewiston Hermit

Revolutionary War newspapers will be sold at Fairfield auction

In need of money, the Bangor Historical Society must part with a ‘significant piece of Americana.’

FAIRFIELD – On Jan. 7, 1765, in the middle of the Stamp Act controversy, Boston shopkeeper Harbottle Dorr purchased the latest issue of the Boston Evening-Post and commented on its contents in the margins.

Legends of the air

WISCASSET – Tom Weatherby, 88, hobbled toward the side of the Japanese AM6 Zero fighter plane.

He closed his eyes and touched the red, rising-sun Japanese symbol painted onto the side of the aircraft. The plane’s cream-colored metal sparkled in the midafternoon sun.

Drum group performs at Intertribal Pow-wow in Bradley

The Two Feathers host drum group performed at the Intertribal Pow-wow at Leonard’s Mills in Bradley on Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011. The pow-wow, open to the public, is hosted by the Maine Forest and Logging Museum. It continues Sunday from noon until 5 p.m. and features music, dancing, storytelling and native craft vendors. Saturday and Sunday’s events also include a noontime Grand Entry with sacred rituals performed by native participants from throughout New England and Canada.

The Lewiston Hermit

This tale is from Skinner’s American Myths and Legend, a volume sharing dozens of tales that He had collected in his work. It is a brief and far from complete story of the old legends concerning the killing of a good many Indians on the Androscoggin River at what is known today as “Great Falls.” Several other tales have also been concocted, such as the one that suggest that Captain Church and his men knew the Indians were coming downriver and set a fire upon the rocks to decoy them into thinking they were farther upstream then they really were as they attacked. Realizing too late that they were upon the falls they couldn’t escape in time and drowned. There are other tales, but I’ll save them for another time.

The postcard image below is of the tiny island just above the falls where the Lewiston Hermit allegedly lived.

THE LEWISTON HERMIT

Charles Montgomery Skinner

ON an island above the falls of the Androscoggin, at Lewiston, Maine, lived a white recluse at the beginning of the eighteenth century. The natives, having had good reason to mistrust all palefaces, could think no good of the man who lived thus among but not with them. Often they gathered at the bank and looked across at his solitary candle twinkling among the leaves, and wondered what manner of evil he could be planning against them. Wherever there are many conspirators one will be a gabbler or a traitor; so, when the natives had resolved on his murder, he, somehow, learned of their intent and set himself to thwart it. So great was their fear of this lonely man, and of the malignant powers he might conjure to his aid, that nearly fifty Indians joined the expedition, to give each other courage.

Their plan was to go a little distance up the river and come down with the current, thus avoiding the dip of paddles that he might hear in a direct crossing.

When it was quite dark they set off, and keeping headway on their canoes aimed them toward the light that glimmered above the water. But the cunning hermit had no fire in his cabin that night. It was burning on a point below his shelter, and from his hiding-place among the rocks he saw their fleet, as dim and silent as shadows, go by him on the way to the misguiding beacon.

Presently a cry arose. The savages had passed the point of safe sailing; their boats had become unmanageable. Forgetting their errand, their only hope now was to save themselves, but in vain they tried to reach the shore: the current was whirling them to their doom. Cries and death-songs mingled with the deepening roar of the waters, the light barks reached the cataract and leaped into the air. Then the night was still again, save for the booming of the flood. Not one of the Indians who had set out on this errand of death survived the hermit’s stratagem.

Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, events, headlines, history, indians, Maine, Maine things to do, stories, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hearth Cooking at the Remick Barn

Family events on tap at Belfast Cohousing and Ecovillage
Bangor Daily News
MACHIAS, Maine — The annual meeting of the Machias Historical Society will be held during a Dutch treat supper at 6 pm Friday, Aug. 12, at Helen’s Restaurant in Machias. A ceremony commemorating the 1777 Battle of Machias will be held at 5:30 pm at…

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Community Website: Islesboro

Tomorrow’s book talk at MHS, described below, explores the love story between a young couple from Islesboro during the Civil War. This community website–developed by local partners from the Islesboro Historical Society, Islesboro Central School, and Alice L. Pendleton Library working with MHS staff–surveys the broader history of this special island in Penobscot Bay. Visit the site.

~~~

Museums of Old York Programs and Events
For a complete and up-to-date calendar of Museums of Old York programs see our website.

August

9, 16 Community Supper Benefit for Old York at Robert’s Maine Grill. Every Tuesday night Robert’s Maine Grill in Kittery offers a “Community Supper” and donates a portion of the proceeds to a local non-profit — in this case, Museums of Old York! The main focus of the supper is a $12, 3 course menu in the spirit of Robert’s style: Maine Comfort Food with an updated twist. The menu is posted by Friday at www.robertsmainegrill.com. For more information email or phone 207-439-0300

11 “History Challenge!” Game Show. Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email Richard Bowen to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

12, 19, 26 Hearth Cooking Demonstrations. Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th-century recipes and techniques over the open fire. Stop in Fridays around 3:00 p.m. to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museum buildings.

14 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email Richard Bowen for details and reservations.

15 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium. This year’s Fellows Symposium will feature presentations on their Tavern and the Library projects, tours of the new Tavern exhibit, and a reception. We encourage all our members and friends to attend and see the results of their work this summer! Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 5 p.m. Free.

21 Museums of Old York Annual Meeting. Calling all members! Please join us this year to weigh in on a new vision for your organization! There will be a recap of highlights of the past year and a financial report. Enjoy refreshments with staff, trustees, and other members. 4 p.m., Remick Barn, York.

25 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

September

9 Preview Party: Fouth Annual Old York Antiques Show. The Old York Antiques Show will begin with a preview party on Friday, September 9th from 5 – 8 p.m. Guests will have an exclusive preview of dealer booths and the first opportunity to purchase antiques while enjoying hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and live music. Tickets for the preview party are $75 and include admission to the Antiques Show on Saturday and Sunday. Patrons who donate $125 will receive one ticket to the Preview Party, be recognized at the event and are invited to a special reception to honor our dealers. Spending Spree Raffle Tickets will be on sale. 100% of the proceeds support the museum’s education programs, which serve over 20,000 children and families each year. Tickets can be purchased in advance by calling the Museums of Old York at (207) 363-4974

10-11 Fourth Annual Old York Antiques Show. The fourth annual antiques show at the Museums of Old York will take place September 10-11. This year’s boutique show, which is generously sponsored by a number of area businesses, will feature approximately twenty dealers highlighting exceptional silver and brass, furniture, paintings, ceramics, jewelry, oriental rugs, nautical items, textiles, folk art and decorative art. 100% of the proceeds from the show support the museum’s education programs. The Antiques Show will take place at the museum’s main campus, located at 3 Lindsay Road in York Village and runs Saturday, September 10 and Sunday, September 11 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The $10 admission includes a two-day ticket to experience the Museums of Old York. Free parking is available on-site.

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of areas outside the village proper. Email Richard Bowen for more information.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany their hearth-cooked meal.Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Reservations required. Email Richard Bowen.

29 History Brought to Life. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

~~~

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.


Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.


Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, events, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Civil War Happenings in Maine & More!

Time tour looks at Deer Isle 150 years ago
Island Ad-Vantages
A Maine Town in the Civil War, by Vernal Hutchinson, with anecdotes such as this one, was the topic of a talk at the Deer Isle-Stonington Historical Society July 23 on the occasion of the annual Touring Through Time event held by area historical

Rachel Field — poet, writer, daughter of Maine
Bangor Daily News
As a result, her legacy is a cherished part of local history around the Cranberry Islands of Maine, of which Sutton is a part. The folks from Great Cranberry Island Historical Society have dedicated a good portion of their wonderful museum to Rachel

Barker book to explore Portland’s Irish in the Civil War
Portland Daily Sun
By David Carkhuff At age 8, Matthew Jude Barker began tracing his family history. At age 11, he joined the Maine Historical Society. So it may come as no surprise that Barker today is immersed in writing not just one but two books on Irish history.

Weekly calendar, Aug. 4, 2011
Bangor Daily News
BREWER — Brewer Historical Society, Clewley Museum, Civil War history and artifacts, 1-3 pm Thursdays, 199 Wilson St. CORINTH — Corinth Historical Society Museum, 2-7 pm Wednesdays, Main Street. HAMPDEN — Hampden Historical Society, Katherine

Museum slide talk to be held in Owls Head
Bangor Daily News
OWLS HEAD, Maine — A slide talk by the Penobscot Marine Museum’s photo archivist Kevin Johnson will be held at 7 pm Thursday, Aug. 11 at the Owls Head Community Building, 224 Ash Point Drive. The talk, sponsored by the Mussel Ridge Historical Society

~~~

History of Bar Harbor Told Through PostcardsEarle Shettleworth pens new book
The newest addition to Arcadia Publishing’s Postcard History series is Bar Harborfrom local author Earle G. Shettleworth Jr. The book boasts more than 200 vintage postcards and memories of days gone by.By 1898, when the production of picture postcards began, Bar Harbor had become one of America’s leading summer resorts and second only to Newport, RI, in wealth and social standing. For the next six decades, the postcard recorded the transformation of this coastal island community into a middle class tourist destination.

Grand hotels, seaside mansions, and elegant gardens made way for roadside cabins and motels catering to automobile travelers. Bar Harbor features many never-before-published postcards from the collections of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, the Bar Harbor Historical Society, and the Penobscot Marine Museum.

Join the Author for the Following Events!

Sherman’s Books and Stationery

Saturday, August 13

6 – 8 p.m.

Available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at www.arcadiapublishing.com or (888)-313-2665

Arcadia Publishing is the leading publisher of local and regional history in the United States. Our mission is to make history accessible and meaningful through the publication of books on the heritage of America’s people and places. Have we done a book on your town? Visit http://www.arcadiapublishing.com.

###

Bar Harborby Earle G. Shettleworth Jr.

Postcard History Series

Price: $21.99

128 pages/ softcover

Available: June 13, 2011

Categories: articles, Books, breaking news, civil war, events, headlines, historical societies, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston

Glass ‘Houses’ in Thomaston Christopher Glass, author of “Historic Maine Homes: 300 Years of Great Houses,” will be the featured speaker at the Thomaston Historical Society’s program Tuesday, Aug. 9 at the Knox Farmhouse, 80 Knox St. The evening will begin with…

Blueberry pancake breakfast to be held in Ellsworth The Blue Hill Historical Society will host a tour of historic Gettysburg Oct. 17-21 with departure locations in Bangor and Portland. The deposit deadline is Aug. 15 and the final payment deadline is Sept. 12…

Discovery of 2 books reveals Strong history The society recently received a grant from the Maine Historical Society’s Maine Memory Network (www.mainememory.net) that will allow the Strong team to purchase a high-quality scanner, computer and archiving materials. The Maine Memory Network was…

Strong groups awarded grant for history project The Strong Historical Society, the Strong Public Library, the High Peaks Alliance, and Strong School have partnered to begin a local history project, funded by a grant recently awarded by the Maine Memory Network…

History symposium scheduled for Aug. 4 in Machias Earl Shettleworth, of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, will be the keynote speaker at the History Symposium being sponsored by the Machias Historical Society. The theme of the symposium will be “Historic Preservation is Alice and Well in…

Author to sign mystery novel at Blueberry Festival Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will sign copies of her book, “The Wilding House,” on Friday and Saturday at the Wilton Historical Society during the Blueberry Festival. Wilton author Barbara Schestopol Craig will…

Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture Everybody knows what wicker is, right? It’s that woven stuff that’s painted white. It may even be that stuff used in some chair seats. Or is that cane? Or rush, or reed? It turns out, Worthologist Fred Taylor explains, the word wicker in furniture terms actually refers to a process rather than a product. Follow along as Fred weaves the story of the evolution of wicker furniture, from ancient Egypt to the late Victorian period of the 1880s and 1890s to today. Read”Wrapping Your Mind around Wicker Furniture”

~~~

Maine Historical Society

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit:

Practical Nursing in Waterville

This exhibit was created by staff at Kennebec Vally Community College, one of Maine Memory Network’s 210+ Contributing Partners.

Thousands of nurses were trained at the Maine School of Practical Nursing in Waterville from the 1950s through the 1980s. Read the story.

MHS News

September 1 Deadline for

Maine Memory Network Grants

Does your community have a story to share? Or a historical collection it would like to provide better access to? MHS is accepting proposals to help YOUR community share its history through Maine Memory Network:

  • Digitization grants (up to $750) are provided to help organizations and local teams use Maine Memory to digitize, catalog, and manage their collections online.
  • Online exhibit grants (up to $1250) are provided to help organizations and local teams share historical stories online. Topics might reflect any aspect of your town’s past, and range from the history of local businesses and industries to the community’s experience during a national event (e.g. the Civil War).

Encourage your favorite local organization to apply! Grants are accompanied by extensive training and support designed to help communities complete their projects and develop a broad range of skills. Detailed information.

From the Collections

MHS Online Catalog and Maine Memory Network recently updated!

If you are looking for a historical object from our collection, or want to browse through Maine artifacts, you can visit our online catalog PastPerfect. We recently added nearly 500 records and over 1,200 images to the catalog, which now contains almost 32,000 searchable records and 23,500 images for museum objects, photographs, manuscript letters, architectural drawings, and newspapers.

Newly added highlights: CMP collection objects, additional images from the Portland Press Herald glass plate negative collection, panoramic photographs, and additional Fogg collection autograph letters, including examples from artist Paul Akers and naturalist Louis Agassiz.

Additions to Maine Memory Network happen every day and we are now featuring 20,155 records! Contributors such as the L.C. Bates Museum and the Dyer Library Archives/ Saco Museum have been busy this summer adding new photos.

You can see what’s new to MMN and even subscribe to an RSS feed for new images and exhibits!

~~~

Museums of Old York

Programs for adults

Thursday, August 4
Author Talk with David Remington at Remick Barn.
We are very pleased to offer an evening with David Remington, who will speak on his recently published book, Ashbel P. Fitch, Champion of Old New York. This biography of his great-grandfather provides a rare glimpse into the gilded age of New York City’s political world. Free for Members of Old York. $5 for nonmembers. Remick Barn, 7 p.m. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Saturday, August 6
Indian Encampment.
Well-known re-enactor, Ken Hamilton, presents a 17th-18th-century Indian Encampment during the day in front of the Remick Barn and Jefferds Tavern. This is a not-to-be-missed event with exciting activities for all age groups. Donations are appreciated. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Thursday, August 11
“History Challenge!” Game Show.
Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answer questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email rbowen@oldyork.org to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

Through Saturday August 13
Emerson House — 2011 Decorator Show House.
Our fundraiser continues with tours on Mon-Wed-Fri-Sat from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., and Sunday afternoons from 1-4 p.m. The house is closed to visitors on Tuesdays. Tickets are $20 at the door. We also have just a few tickets remaining for our final luncheon and designer discussion on August 10 at The York Harbor Reading Room. Tickets are $55 and include lunch, lecture and a full show house tour. To purchase tickets, please call (207) 363-4974. Visit our website for updates on the show house and other special events.

Sunday, August 14
Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed.
Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

Monday, August 15
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening. The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and Grand Opening of the Exhibit — Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer; Report on Library and Archives Project — Jessica Frankenfield, Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine, 5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m. Reception immediately following. Email development@oldyork.org for more information.

Fun for kids and families

Friday, August 5
Hearth Cooking Demonstration.
Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th -century receipts and techniques over the open fire. Watch and help as they prepare everything from fish and chicken to bread, pies and pudding using traditional methods such as Dutch ovens, iron kettles, and the bake oven. Stop in around 3:00 p.m. every Friday in July and August in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museums buildings. Email education@oldyork.org for more information.

Through Thursday, August 25
Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs.
Our summer camp programs for children build on the core curriculum of our school programs and provide children with learning experiences in a fun and supportive environment. Download a brochure and sign-up form for Morning Adventures Summer Camp Programs for Children. Reservations are required for all programs. Programs run 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. and cost $23 ($20 members) unless otherwise indicated. For more information email education@oldyork.org or phone (207) 363-4974.

~~~

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores.

Those who are fortunate enough to have grown up in Maine know that it has a way of life and sense of humor unlike anywhere else. Spend time on a lobster boat with Roy Fairfield or Tim Sample, or on Echo Farm in Auburn as Dave Sargent relates it. Phil Candelmo talks about life in Portland during World War II, and Luthera Burton Dawson teaches us a bit of “Mainespeak.” These are only a few of the stories told here and of the thousands cherished by Mainers. If you have ever wondered what it was like to live in Maine’s bygone days, follow along with our contributors and see what tales they have to tell about this state’s unique spirit.

Salt & Pines is now available at your local bookstores. I have made a few concessions to changes of the cover and some images, but the stories are all there. It is now available through your local bookstore and on Amazon.com. Alternatively, you can order it direct by clicking the buy now button above, or following this link: https://historypress.net/indexsecure.php?prodid=9781609493684. You can paste the link into your browsers search window if it does not work by simply clicking it.

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, museum news, Museums of Old York, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Willowbrook Village Needs Your Help!

Willowbrook Village, a historic Maine gem, may be lost
Its endowment depleted, the museum of 19th century life in Newfield will close if it doesn’t get help.

19th Century Willowbook Village 501(c)(3) from Ameilia Chamberlain on Vimeo.

Civil War re-enactment coming to Otisfield The 1839 meetinghouse on Bell Hill Road will be transformed Sunday into a Civil War encampment for the first time in many years to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Members of Maine’s Company A, 3rd Maine Regiment Volunteer Infantry, will be camped out…

Volunteers unearth clues to town’s past Artifacts uncovered in a Freeport archaeological dig help tell the story of one of the community’s earliest residents…

The Value and Importance Of Maintaining Civil War Sites

Posted: 25 Jul 2011 08:54 AM PDT

It is an honor to stand with you on one of our most sacred American landscapes. Here, 150 years ago today, the nation got its first real look at civil war. This is where American democracy began its baptism by fire. Where the grueling four-year journey that shaped a nation, began in earnest. The battle of Manassas dispelled the myth that the war would be a quick affair…Over 620,000 lives. That was the price exacted by the Civil War. But those were only the military deaths. The war’s impact extended much farther than the battlefield….

Culture celebrated at Micmac farmers market It was a day of cultural and natural celebration at the Micmac farmers market Saturday aimed at encouraging natives and non-natives alike to get back to their roots. The Aroostook Band of Micmacs invited the public to their farmers market on Route 1 near the Caribou…

Last supper at Jacques Cartier Club
Just before 5 p.m. Saturday, a long table at the Jacques Cartier Club was brimming with baked beans of several varieties, hot dogs, bread, coleslaw and casseroles galore. More than 100 waited to eat, for $6 apiece, a meal that included dessert and beverage. For the last time…

Responding to ‘But, It’s ____’ Queries When conducting an appraisal, Worthologist Harry Rinker says he’s more likely to disappoint than please when providing values, as nearly everyone thinks what he/she owns is worth more than its value on the secondary market. When providing an appraisal value, he looks people straight in the eyes. Their facial expression, especially the eyes, is an excellent indicator of their unhappiness if they feel the value is too low. And then follows the question asking how can it be worth so little? “But, it’s (fill in the blank).” Click through to see how Harry answers this stock query. Read “Responding to ‘But, It’s ____’ Queries”

~~~

From the Museums of Old York:

Programs for adults

Thursday, August 4
Author Talk with David Remington at Remick Barn. We are very pleased to offer an evening with David Remington, who will speak on his recently published book, Ashbel P. Fitch, Champion of Old New York. This biography of his great-grandfather provides a rare glimpse into the gilded age of New York City’s political world. Free for Members of Old York. $5 for nonmembers. Remick Barn, 7 p.m. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Saturday, August 6
Indian Encampment. Well-known re-enactor, Ken Hamilton, presents a 17th-18th-century Indian Encampment during the day in front of the Remick Barn and Jefferds Tavern. This is a not-to-be-missed event with exciting activities for all age groups. Donations are appreciated. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for more information.

Thursday, August 11
“History Challenge!” Game Show. Test your knowledge of our past. Put together a team of two to four people and register to participate in this fun and challenging “Jeopardy”-style history game who. Answer questions correctly to gain points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins cash! $5 per person to play, $1 suggested donation to be in the audience. Call 207-363-4974 or email rbowen@oldyork.org to register your team. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York.

Through Saturday August 13
Emerson House — 2011 Decorator Show House. Our fundraiser continues with tours on Mon-Wed-Fri-Sat from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., and Sunday afternoons from 1-4 p.m. The house is closed to visitors on Tuesdays. Tickets are $20 at the door. We also have just a few tickets remaining for our final luncheon and designer discussion on August 10 at The York Harbor Reading Room. Tickets are $55 and include lunch, lecture and a full show house tour. To purchase tickets, please call (207) 363-4974. Visit our website for updates on the show house and other special events.

Sunday, August 14
Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

Monday, August 15
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening. The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and Grand Opening of the Exhibit — Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer; Report on Library and Archives Project — Jessica Frankenfield, Remick Barn, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine, 5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m. Reception immediately following. Email development@oldyork.org for more information.

Save the Date: August 15, 2011
2011 Elizabeth Perkins Fellows Symposium & Exhibit Opening

The Revitalization of Jefferds Tavern and
Grand Opening of the Exhibit

Rebecca Bush, Tess Kahn, Lisa Hartung, and Emily Shafer

Report on Library and Archives Project
Jessica Frankenfield

Remick Barn
3 Lindsay Road, York Village, Maine

Monday, August 15, 2011
5:00 ~ 6:00 p.m.

Reception Immediately Following

RSVP by email or phone: (207)363-4974

Save the Date: August 21, 2011
Annual Meeting to Feature Discussion of Dramatic Changes for Old York
Calling all members! Please join us this year to weigh in on a new vision for your organization! Old York’s board and staff are working on a strategic plan to address the significant changes affecting Old York and historical museums nationwide. Join a lively discussion of where we may go from here to thrive as a vital part of our community.

There will be a recap of highlights of the past year and a financial report. Enjoy refreshments with staff, trustees, and other members.

Museums of Old York Annual Meeting
Sunday, August 21, 2011, 4 p.m., Remick Barn, York
Phone (207) 363-4974 for more information

~~~

From the Maine Historical Society:

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Historic Photograph: Model Train Races, Houlton, ca. 1960

Click the photograph above, contributed to Maine Memory Network

by the Oakfield Historical Society, to learn about the race!

This Week

Tuesday, July 26, 12pm

Screening: Rapid River Races, 1940

Presenter: Zip Kellogg, Author and Paddler

Join us for a special screening and talk. This 17 minute silent color film is a window into canoe and kayak racing equipment and techniques from another era. It documents the 1940 National Whitewater Canoe & Kayak Championships which were held on the Rapid River in western Maine. The film was lost since it was made 70 years ago; Maine paddler Zip Kellogg had been on the lookout for it for 30 years. Only by utter chance and a twist of fate did it turn up! Zip will share this wonderful story of historical serendipity.

National Whitewater Canoe, Royal River, 1940

Next Week

Tuesday, August 2, 12:00pm

Book Talk: Portland’s Greatest Conflagration: The 1866 Fire Disaster

Speakers: Michael Daicy and Don Whitney, Authors

Friday, August 5, 5-8pm

Dressing Up: First Friday Art Walk

Will you come dressed up to “fit in” or “stand out”?

Categories: antiques, archeology, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, Education, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

History of Raymond and Casco Told Through Photographs

Authors Martha Watkins Glassford and Pamela Watkins Grant are fifth-generation residents of Raymond and Casco and are active members of the Raymond-Casco Historical Society.

Raymond and Casco

by Martha Watkins Glassford, Pamela Watkins Grant

Images of America Series

Price: $21.99

128 pages/ softcover

Available: June 27, 2011

For Immediate Release

Media inquiries contact: Gervase Kolmos, Sales and Marketing Specialist

843.853.2070 x 181 gkolmos@arcadiapublishing.com

History of Raymond and Casco Told Through Photographs

Local authors team up on new book

The newest addition to Arcadia Publishing’s popular Images of America series is Raymond and Casco from local authors Martha Watkins Glassford and Pamela Watkins Grant. The book boasts more than 200 vintage images primarily from the Raymond-Casco Historical Society’s archives, illustrating the history of these towns and the struggles and triumphs of their early residents.

Early residents in Raymond and Casco pioneered the land, building roads and carving a life out of the wilderness. In the late 1800s, local manufacturers harvested and sold ice blocks. Later residents built yachts and established radio communications. Local poets and authors like Martin Dibner and Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote of characters and folklore.

The many vintage photographs in Raymond and Casco depict hardworking men and women in their corn shops, blacksmith shops, sawmills, schools, and places of worship, taking readers back in time to a way of life that is since long gone.

Available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at www.arcadiapublishing.com or

(888)-313-2665.

Arcadia Publishing is the leading publisher of local and regional history in the United States. Our mission is to make history accessible and meaningful through the publication of books on the heritage of America’s people and places. Have we done a book on your town? Visit http://www.arcadiapublishing.com.

###

Categories: Books, breaking news, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Maine Preservation Honors University of Maine

Effort under way to save the Greenville Junction Depot; railroad workers … Hall, who is spearheading the project, said the Maine Historic Preservation Society in 2008 listed the depot as one of the most endangered historical buildings in the state. Much of the depot, built in 1889 by the Canadian Pacific Railroad…

Authors and their books The Cushing Historical Society’s Arts in the Barn series will focus on local authors in “Cushing Authors and Their Books.” Each summer weekend, one or two local artists display their works for Arts in the Barn…

Camden-Rockport Historical Society’s antiques show celebrates 31st anniversary The 31st annual Camden-Rockport Historical Society Antiques Show and Sale will be held Saturday, July 23 and Sunday, July 24 at Camden Hills Regional High School. Started and promoted all these years by John and Liz DeSimone of Goosefare Antiques…

Lexington residents band together to preserve its history According to the Historical Society’s research, the area was first settled in 1807 and was part of a large tract of land given by Massachusetts lottery. William King served as the land agent and later became the first Maine governor…

Maine Preservation honors UMaine for Coburn Hall renovations Portland; the Brown Library and Longfellow Garden at the Maine Historical Society in Portland; Gilman Place-Gilman Street School in Waterville; Littlefield School in West Bath and the Mill at Saco Falls-Laconia Mill in Biddeford…

1812 battlefield park in Michigan to expand Privately owned land once envisioned for an industrial recycling plant or a new hotel now is public property that can be used to expand the River Raisin National Battlefield Park to more than four times its current size. U.S. Interior Department Secretary Ken Salazar, U.S. Rep. John D. Dingell, D-Dearborn, and a host of other dignitaries were on hand at the federal park Wednesday morning for a ceremonial deeding of the additional property to public ownership. It could add more than 143 acres to the federal park’s current 42-acre site and includes property north of the current federal land bordering Mason Run and also east, across Detroit Ave. from the park site near E. Elm Ave. and N. Dixie Hwy….

~~~


Opening Night Reception
Friday, July 15th, 6pm to 9pm

Join the Museums of Old York for this delightful annual summer event. Meet the designers and see their incredible transformation of this historic property while enjoying a fun evening of jazz by Peter Dugas and great food catered by
Kitchen Chicks.

Tickets are $50 per person and are available by calling 207.363.4974

Opening Night Reception presenting sponsor

Directions to Emerson House

From I-95 in Maine, take exit 7 and merge onto the spur road, heading east towards U.S. Route 1. Go right on U.S. Route 1 south. At first traffic light turn left on York Street towards York Village, and at the Civil War monument in the heart of the Village turn left on Long Sands Road. Emerson House is located on the right at 31 Long Sands Road, just past the entrance to York Public Library, and just before Woodbridge Road. Parking is available in several area lots, including York Public Library.

The Decorator Show House is open July 16 – August 13
For more information regarding the Emerson House visit:
www.oldyork.org

~~~

From the Maine Historical Society

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Online Exhibit:
Hermann Kotzschmar: Portland’s Musical Genius

Portland’s municipal organ is in the news: the nearly 100-year old gem, housed in Merrill Auditorium, needs a major renovation.

Portland’s City Hall burned in 1908. When the new City Hall opened in 1912, the Kotzschmar Organ was its centerpiece. Its story reflects an interesting moment in American culture, and Portland’s own rich musical heritage. While municipal organs were once prevalent in the United States, only two remain. (The other is in San Diego.)

This exhibit explores the life and musical career of Herman Kotzschmar (1829-1908), the longtime Portland organist for whom it is named.

Coming Soon

Tuesday, July 19, 12:00pm

Book Event: Deering: A Social and Architectural History

Speaker: William D. Barry, Historian (and MHS reference librarian!)

Tuesday, July 26, 12:00pm

Screening: Rapid River Races, 1940

Presenter: Zip Kellogg, Author and Paddler

Tuesday, August 2, 12:00pm

Book Talk: Portland’s Greatest Conflagration: The 1866 Fire Disaster

Speakers: Michael Daicy and Don Whitney, Authors

Categories: Art Exhibit, breaking news, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, preservation, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: