antiques

Nelson Dingley Jr.

Genealogy is about the memories we give, as well
The presentation is free and open to all. Donations will be accepted to benefit Orono Historical Society. For information on researching family history in Maine, see Genealogy Resources under Family Ties at bangordailynews.com/browse/family-ties

$10000 grant will help renovate old train depot
The 1851 depot is the oldest rail-related structure in Maine, and among the oldest in the US, according to a press release from the society. The restoration is a component of the society’s ongoing initiative to restore its historic village…

Presque Isle trolley offering trips back in time
“There used to be electric trolleys all over the state,” said historical society president Craig Green. “But this is the first-ever trolley in northern Maine.” Vintage trolleys and replicas like the Presque Isle vehicle are common tourist attractions…

Misery Gore. China. Meddybemps. Bangor. Poland. Amity. Cornville. Maine names: Behind the state’s unusual place names are our hopes, ancestors, religion, colorful characters and imaginations.

Have you ever driven down a Maine road and seen a sign that made you wonder just where on Earth our names come from? Meddybemps. Mars Hill. Argyle. Misery Gore. That last one might have made you want to turn back. There are some pretty odd place names in Maine and…

In death, Portland woman reunited with long-lost love

Teresa Getchell spent decades seeking the truth about her husband’s wartime death in 1969.

Cultivating Younger Buyers a Must for Antique Dealers
As an antique dealer and collector, as well as a business owner, Michelle Staley is always looking for new ways to reinvent her business, her brand and her product line. Right now, Michelle says, she sees the need to make her inventory attractive to the Twentysomething consumer. Many Baby Boomers are downsizing and, while they are still spending money on antiques and collectibles, Michelle argues that antiques and collectibles dealers need to cultivate a younger generation of shoppers to keep their businesses afloat. So, how do you go about making your antique store front or website attractive to the young consumer? Michelle has some tips. Read “Cultivating Younger Buyers a Must for Antique Dealers”

More Events, Exhibits and Presentations

Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection: Exhibit of photography from the museum’s archives. Free. At Camden Public Library. April 1-30.

Selections from the Elmer Montgomery and Atlantic Fisherman Collections: Exhibits of photography from the museum’s archives. Free. At Hutchinson Center, Belfast. Through April 30.

Digging Deeper into the Elmer Montgomery Collection: Illustrated talk by Curator Ben Fuller. Free. At Hutchinson Center, Belfast. April 25, 6:30 p.m.

Greetings from Stockton Springs: Illustrated talk by Photo Archivist Kevin Johnson, with historic photos from the Eastern Illustrating collection. Free. At Stockton Springs Community Library. April 29, 2 p.m.

Maine Agriculture: Views from the Past: Historic photo exhibit. Donation requested. At Page Farm and Home Museum, University of Maine-Orono. May 10 – Nov. 10.

The following is excerpted from Representative Men of Maine, ed. by Henry Chase, pub. 1893 by the Lakeside Press:

Journalist, Legislator, Ex-Governor, and Congressman, Nelson Dingley, Jr., stands in the front rank of the sons of Maine and is in very many respects a most excellent type of New England character. Ability, industry, courage, and a capacity for work are the great causes of his success. It is these, coupled with honesty and perseverance, that have made his pathway straight from the country schoolhouse to the national capitol.

Mr. Dingley was born in Durham, Maine, February 15, 1832, being the eldest son of Nelson and Jane L. Dingley. The following year the parents removed to Parkman, this state, where they kept a country store in connection with the village hotel. The son was distinguished in the district school for his studious habits and good scholarship. At twelve years of age, he attended the high school, three miles distant, walking each morning and night and carrying his dinner pail. When sixteen years of age he organized a temperance society in his town, and from that time to the present he has always taken a deep interest, and been an able and faithful worker, in the great cause of temperance. When seventeen years of age he taught school in the town of China, and continued to teach every win1er but one for the next five years. In 1851, he entered Colby University, then Waterville College, where he remained one year and a half, and then took a course at Dartmouth, from which he graduated in 1855 with high rank in scholarship.

After leaving college, Mr. Dingley studied law with Morrill & Fessenden at Auburn, and was admitted to the Bar in 1856. In September of that year he purchased one-half of the Lewiston Journal, and the year following he became the sole proprietor and editor. At this time, the Journal
was a weekly paper. A daily edition was added in 1861, and Frank L., a younger brother of Nelson, became associated with the paper, which has continued under their management to the present time. It supported the first Republican nominee in this State, and has since that time been an able Republican journal

In 1861 Mr. Dingley received his first election to public office, being only twenty-nine years of age. He was re-elected a member of the Legislature in 1862, 1863, 1864, 1868, and 1873; was speaker in 1863 and 1864. In 1867-8 he was at the head of the State Lodge of Good Templars, and was justly regarded as the leader in the temperance and prohibitory movement in Maine. Mr. Dingley was elected Governor of the State in 1873, and re-elected by an increased majority in 1874, but declined a re-election the following year.

In 1881 he was elected by the Republicans in the second district to fill the vacancy in Congress caused by the election to the Senate of Hon. William P. Frye, and took his seat in the House at the opening of the Forty-seventh Congress, in December of that year. He was re-elected to the Forty-eighth, Forty ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty-first, Fifty-second, and Fifty-third Congresses, and always by good majorities.

Mr. Dingley’s first speech in Congress was made April 25, 1882, on “Protection to American Shipping.” This speech commanded attention both in Congress and throughout the country, especially in commercial circles. It was pronounced by the Washington Star “a speech of much ability and force, giving promise of a successful career in Congress,” and by the Washington correspondent of the New York Tribune ” one of the best speeches ever made by a new member.” He has taken an active part in the discussions of many of the leading measures before the House during his congressional career. Among those may be mentioned the various shipping bills the silver question, reduction of taxation, compulsory pilotage, the tariff, the fishery question, the French spoliation claims, the anti-Chinese bill, etc. Perhaps his greatest efforts in Congress have been devoted to relieving American shipping of many of the burdens resting upon it and to the promotion of that great industry in which many of his constituents have large interests.

Mr. Dingley has served on some of the important committees of the House, notably the Ways and Means, the Appropriations, the Banking and Currency Committee, the Committee on Merchant Marine and Eisheries, and the Select Committee on American Ship-building and Ship-owning Interests In 1884 he reported from the Shipping Committee a bill to remove certain burdens on American shipping, and a bill to “Constitute a Bureau of Navigation” in the Treasury Department, and largely through his labor and influence these bills passed both houses of Congress the same year and became laws.

As a legislator Congressman Dingley is industrious and painstaking, and as a debater he is vigorous and logical. He is thoroughly conscientious and honest in all he does and says, and to these qualities may be attributed largely his success in Congress and throughout his whole public career.

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The Lombard Log hauler

A Unique Waterville Industry

Manufacturing a Steam Log Hauler that, meets with popular favor among the lumbermen, the business of A. O. Lombard, Waterville has grown to large proportions and volume since he became established in 1903.

When the business was founded the facilities were small, to-day the firm occupy about 20,000 square feet of floor space, with modern offices, fire proof boiler house, spacious machine shops etc. In 1910 the firm erected a new and modern brick building two stores high 110 x 38 feet which is fire proof throughout.

The lower story of the new addition is used for assembling the Log Haulers, the upper story being devoted to the construction of gasoline engines for traction purposes. The Lombard Steam Log Haulers have an unsurpassed reputation in the United States and Canada and are known to be first-class and soundly serviceable, each hauler developing 100 horse power. Every outfit made at this plant is designed with the greatest care, constructed skillfully and painstakingly by experienced workmen and the highest grade and most durable material only is used. Employment is given to about 22 hands, all of whom earn good wages.

Mr. A. O. Lombard, the inventor, who still remains the head of the business, was born in Springfield, Maine, and has been a resident of Waterville for 16 years. His progressiveness and sagacity in the conduct of his present enterprise have given him a sound and desirable standing in the commercial world.

So says the Board of Trade Journal in a May 1910 edition of that then popular business magazine. Lombard, an inventor from Waterville Maine gave the logging industry a swift kick in the pants, providing a new way to maximize productivity for the timber harvest here in Maine, and elsewhere as well. There were other versions of this steam-powered tractor, such as the Canadian variety produced by the Jenckes Machine Company of Sherbrooke, Quebec and the Western variety made by the Phoenix Company in Eau Claire Wisconsin. The Lombard version was considered the best in the industry, however.

The Lombard was capable of pulling many more sleds than a team of oxen or mules were, capable of pretty much creating their own roadways, and were much better in the snow than other means of hauling logs were. This made the tractor a favorite choice as it was much more economical, and saved much labor, thereby reducing harvesting costs even further. Nevertheless, it did have its drawbacks. Downhill runs were dangerous as there was no way to brake the hauler, and sleds loaded down with logs were prone to jackknifing and overrunning the tractor. For this reason tracks were made with steep sides to run the “train” in to prevent this from happening. “Snub lines” and Barienger Brakes were also used at times on particularly steep grades.

The following piece is from the Horseless Age magazine, vol10, issue 22, in which Lombard writes a letter to the editor describing the haulers:

A Steam Logging Outfit

Waterville, Me., November 21. Editor Horseless Age:

We have just completed one of our steam log haulers, run it .out of the shop and taken a picture of it, which you will find enclosed. You will notice that the machine now has wheels under the forward part: we use wheels in the summer and a sled in the winter; the rest of the machine remains the same both summer and winter. You will notice in looking at the photo that we have an endless lag bed which makes the rear runner carry practically the whole weight of the machine of about 15 tons, with the exception of about 1 ton that bears on the forward sled. The runner is driven by a pair of engines and takes its steam at five-eighths stroke, so it can never get on dead centre. The runner, or endless lag bed, which you can see in the picture, is made of steel castings jointed together in such a way as to run over the sprocket wheels with toe cocks cast on them, the same as on a horse, so when they come in contact with the snow or ground there can be no slipping, even if it strikes the glare ice. This runner is driven through its rear sprocket wheel, which is constructed in such a way that the runner can tilt at any position that the road may require. The entire weight of the machine sets on a 5-inch axle running through the runner and hung loose at the ends so that the runner always tilts easily over rough going, rocks or anything that it may come in contact with, with a remarkable easy and quiet motion, which it is impossible to get from a round wheel. The opposite side of the machine is a duplicate of the side you see in the picture.

The machine is driven by a 100 horse power equipment. The boiler is a regular locomotive boiler fitted up with the necessary injectors, water tank and suction hose for taking water from springs or streams along the road: also with a cabin and wood box in the rear, as we always use wood, for the reason that using wood is far cheaper in the lumber woods than to use coal. The machine is reversible, the same as a locomotive, and will run one way as well as the other. It has a force draught, caused by the exhaust, the same as a locomotive: it also has a governor on the steam pipe just before it branches to each engine, which governor controls the speed of the machine and is belted to the main shaft.

This governor is set to give the machine a speed of 5 miles per hour, and presents the advantage that the engineer may pull the throttle wide open and the machine will take care of its own speed in plunging in and out of sharp pitches and cradle knolls, and gets the necessary steam ior up hill. This machine, without any load hitched to it, is capable of climbing any grade that a man can climb up afoot. Our experimental machine, which we had in the woods last winter, could easily carry 20.000 feet spruce lumber per load over a logging road of 7 miles and make two turns per day. The reason why we put on two sets of double engines, making four cylinders in all, is to get rid of the compensating gear: in making turns in the road one pair of engines runs a little faster, which makes it the best possible compensating arrangement. To steer this machine we put one horse in the shafts of the sled that belongs under the front end, tie up the reins and let him go. We never ask him to start or stop.

The Lawrence. Newhall & Page Company, of Shawmut. Me., have bought the experimental machine that we had in the woods for them last winter; also the two new machines now under construction, which are practically all done, and of which enclosed is a photo. They intend to move on a road of 7 miles their entire output of lumber, making 7.000.000 feet. According to our experiment last winter we can haul as much lumber for about $8 or $10 expense as they can for $too expense with horses, to say nothing about the larger depreciation in horses compared with this machine. We hitched up four of their lumber sleds, one behind the other, and put S.ooo feet on each sled. The front sled has a coupling on the end of the pole, the machine is backed up and a pin dropped, the same as on steam railroads. This machine is especially useful in snow to break out its own roads or to haul snow plows after big storms, etc. A patent was granted on it May 21. 1901.

A. O. Lombard

When all is said and done, in spite of the gas and diesel motors rapid development, Lombard’s steam tractor did indeed provide a valuable piece of equipment to the logging industry. It proved the value of machine of sheer animal power in the field, and spelled an end to the era of twitching logs with ox teams and horses or mules. The Lombard Hauler gave way to gas powered skidders and tractors as the even greater power they provided decreased the costs of harvesting even more.

Lombard also developed an electric log hauler which he named the “Forest Echo,” and operated it in the area of Alder Stream. This also was a successful invention, though nat as popular as the steam and later gas powered haulers as a system of electric wires was required to operate the machine. The electric hauler had an engine of 25 horsepower, weighed fourteen tons, and on a test run pulled a load seven miles that scaled 17,280 board feet of logs.

Maine has a long line of inventors to her name, and some, such as A.O. Lombard achieved renowned success, and a success that we true Mainers can be proud of.

The Lombard Hauler gas powered version

Another view of the Lombard Hauler

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L.L. Bean: The stuff of legend

Headlines have been kind of sparse lately, so I have decided to add some material beyond the front pages and event listings in the next few posts. You can still email your events and news that you would like to share at the same old address: editor@remembermemedia.com though.

LL Bean in Freeport is celebrating their 100th anniversary this year and it looks like there will be lots of excitement and a good number of events to spread the pride of reaching that milestone. 100 years is a long time for a business to be open, and I extend my hand in congratulations for their success, and wish them another 100 years. The papers will be full of articles the next few months with lots of information and articles on the birth and growth of this company.

Of course, as we all know, Leo Leonwood Bean designed his first hunting shoe in 1911 because he, like so many of us, was sick and tired of having wet, cold, and aching feet when returning home from his jaunts in the woods. He had some leather tops sewn to a pair of rubbers, and the rest is history. The Bean ad here lists a service whereby a hunter could send in any old pair of boots, and LL Bean’s craftsmen would clean them up, sew on a pair of rubbers and add new laces for the exorbitant cost (at the time) of just $3.40. Bean’s 100th anniversary hunting shoe lists for $139.00 in their catalog. What a difference a century makes!

L.L. Bean: The stuff of legend

FREEPORT — In the rear of a plain-looking white house — not far from the crush of shoppers at L.L. Bean’s retail complex — reside the relics of the company’s century-long history.

Racks of vintage wool coats hang alongside antique fishing poles and knapsacks. L.L. Bean-brand dinnerware sold in the 1950s is here. So are the original paintings used for the covers of Eisenhower-era L.L. Bean catalogs…

History’s hidden in the floorboards

MAPLE GROVE – This small Quaker church just two miles from the Canadian border was likely the last stop on the Underground Railroad for many runaway slaves making their way to freedom, according to historians in the Fort Fairfield area. But it isn’t always easy to find references to it among historical accounts of the Underground Railroad, which helped tens of thousands of slaves gain freedom before slavery was abolished in 1865.

Those who helped the slaves faced jail and heavy fines, so they didn’t tend to leave written records of what they did…

Family history workshop offered at Counting House Museum

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — A public workshop called Researching and Writing Your Family’s History will be held on the second floor of the Counting House Museum at 1 p.m. March 4.

Presented by author Joseph Hardy with genealogist Beth Tykodi, the event is free for members of the Old Berwick Historical Society, and new members are welcome to join at the door. A one-year membership donation is $20 per person or $30 for a family.

Hardy, whose book, “Four American Stories: Emigration and the Lure of the West,” was published this year, will explain how he discovered and developed the stories of his and his wife’s grandparents and their ancestors. He describes his book…

County man collects chain saws of all shapes, styles and colors

ALLAGASH, Maine — Anyone who has spent any time at all in the Maine woods is familiar with the sounds of a gas-powered chain saw. The constant buzz of a saw is the soundtrack to timber operations, woodlot maintenance and firewood gathering. It’s also music to the ears

 

From the Maine Historical Society

Friday, March 2, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk: Take to the Streets

Join us for a festive evening at MHS! Exhibits on display include Take to the Streets! in the Shettleworth Lecture Hall, Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In: Adornment & Identity in Maine in our main gallery, and fantastic work by students in our Local History, Local Schools program in the Showcase Gallery.

Tuesday, March 6, 12pm

Longfellow’s Shadow: A reading of poems by Wesley McNair and Betsy Sholl

Join us to kick off our Richard D’Abate program series with readings by two Maine Poet Laureates. In his tenure at MHS, D’Abate, himself a poet, has embraced MHS’s Longfellow legacy as an opportunity to incorporate literature, the arts, and culture as vital elements of a Maine history that is broadly told and understood. The poets’ readings will reflect themes in Longfellow’s poetry, his stance as a poet, and his attitude toward the social issues of his time.

March Programs at Old York (From their March 2012 newsletter)

2nd Curator’s Potluck. Join us as we thank last year’s donors to our collections. Bring your appetite and a favorite dish to share. 5:30 p.m. at the Parsons Center. FMI and to RSVP to 207-363-4974 ext. 20 or email Cynthia Young-Gomes.

13th Stories, Stones and Superstitions — Author Talk at York Public Library. New England’s burying grounds are often called outdoor museums – full of history, art and chronicles of religious beliefs, genealogy, sometimes tragedy and scandal – even humor. Author Roxie Zwicker’s presentation will provide an explanation of the symbolism and special language of gravestones and further explore the attitudes and customs about death that these historic artifacts reflect. Focusing on early New England grave markers and their carvers, this illustrated program promises to be informative as well as entertaining and should make you look at area gravestones with new insight and appreciation. Books and artwork will be on sale after the presentation. Program co-sponsored by York Public Library and Museums of Old York. Noon at York Library, 15 Long Sands Road, York. Call 207-363-2818

18th Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. Join this lively bunch on the third Sunday of (almost) every month from 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI: email or call 207-363-4974

25th Andrea Quartet at the Parsons Center. Come listen to beautiful classical music by Haydn, Dvorak and Grainger at the Remick Barn. Learn about the composers and their work from violinists Augusto Salazar and Theresa Carr; violist Katie Backus; and cellist Michael Danielski. 3 Lindsay Road, York; 2 p.m. Ticket Prices: Adult $10, Student $5, Family $25.To purchase tickets stop by the museum office or call 207-363-4974 ext. 14.

31st Tap, Tap, Tap….. A Special Jefferds Tavern Dinner Fundraiser! Celebrate the very end of winter and help us raise funds for the winterization and restoration of Jefferds Tavern. A much beloved historic building, the Tavern continues to be a focal point in York Village and is used year-round for the Museum’s educational programs, Tavern Dinners and the annual Christmas Tea. The building stands as a shining example of how a group of concerned people can protect history while at the same time making a building relevant to the community. Today the tavern needs insulation, new clapboards, and “buttoning up” so that it can be used throughout the winter months with energy efficiency. Once this work is completed, there will be no better or more charming location for bridge parties, sewing groups, poetry readings, book clubs, tavern dinners, and the new educational programs for both children and adults. Watch for your invitation in the mail in early March. At the Parsons Center, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, 6:30 p.m. for wine and hors d’oeuvres, 7:30 p.m. for dinner; $125 per person; RSVP by March 23, 2012; FMI call 207-363-4974 ext. 13 or email Laura Dehler.

Collecting a Hero for the Ages: A Look at Flash Gordon
Long before “Star Trek” and “Star Wars” captivated audiences with their imaginative tales of heroes, villains, alien creatures and travel to other galaxies, science-fiction fans were enthralled by the gallant exploits of the fearless space adventurer, Flash Gordon. Created by artist and cartoonist Alex Raymond, the dashing, blond-haired hero has been traveling to the strange planets, meeting a host of unusual beings and bizarre creatures, and battling the planet Mongo’s evil ruler, Ming the Merciless, for 78 years. As one of the science-fiction genre’s earliest and most popular creations, Flash Gordon was also one of the first…

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Fort Andross Winter Antique Show

Steeple repairs to make history

The 186-year-old structure atop First Parish Church is being refurbished to match the original, even the wood

Community Calendar Feb. 1-12
Portland History Docents classes, Thursdays 9 am-12 pm, Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress St. #2, Portland, registration required, 774-5561 ext. 120. City of Portland Republican Caucus, 9:30 am, Riverton Elementary, 1600 Forest Ave., Portland.

Fort Kent Historical Society, archives unveil massive genealogical collection
Thanks to his efforts and with the support of the Fort Kent Historical Society and the Acadian Archives at the University of Maine at Fort Kent, the massive collection of books, photographs, notes, maps and related genealogical ephemera is now indexed…

Eastport’s 1814 history deserves commemoration
Members of the Eastport Border Historical Society have done a great job in opening the pages of our history to so many people. It is time, however, for the entire community delegation, Maine state government, members of Congress and all of Maine to get…

Maine to Ohio … Farmall collection finds new home

Alden Peabody, of Augusta, Maine, restored the tractors with his father, Harold. … and did not understand the history or the significance of the models…

FORT ANDROSS WINTER ANTIQUE SHOW!

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO THE SECOND ANNUAL FORT ANDROSS WINTER ANTIQUE SHOW!
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 26TH, 2012
FROM 10AM TO 3PM!
LOCATED IN TH HISTORIC FORT ANDROSS BUILDING
AT 14 MAINE STREET BRUNSWICK, ME 04011
THE SHOW WILL OFFER 54 PLUS DEALERS SELLING AN ASSORTMENT OF ANTIQUES AND ACCESSORIES!
THESE RANGE FROM 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY PRIMITIVES, FURNITURE, FOLK ART, ART, POTTERY, FIRE ARMS, NAUTICAL, JEWELRY, PEWTER, TEXTILES, AND SO MUCH MORE!
EARLY BUYING FROM 8AM TO 10AM, $5 ADMISSION FEE
FREE GENERAL ADMISSION STARTING AT 10AM!
FREE PARKING
FOOD WILL BE PROVIDED BY FORT ANDROSS’ OWN “THE FOOD DUDE” JAC CARY
AND DELECTIABLE DESERTS BY DAVE HANSEN!

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU!
“YOU ARE SURE TO FIND SOMETHING RARE, UNUSUAL, OR ONE OF A KIND!”

THANK YOU!

FOR SHOW INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
DEBORAH J. STUFFLEBEAM
SHOW MANAGER
207-607-4514
207-522-1977
207-607-4513-FAX
CABOT@WATERFRONTME.COM
WWW.CABOTIQUES.COM

February events at Museums of Old York:

For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

February

2nd Maine’s Museums: Art, Oddities & Artifacts. Janet Mendelsohn, author of Maine’s Museums: Art, Oddities & Artifacts (Countryman Press, 2011) will present “On the road to Maine’s Museums,” a talk, slide show and book signing at York Public Library. Explore Maine through its art, history, maritime, children’s and quirky museums. Mendelsohn, a freelance writer for the Boston Globe travel section and other publications, will offer ideas for day trips, mini-vacations and armchair traveling. Books will be available for purchase. The event, part of the York Public Library’s Brown Bag Lunch series, is co-sponsored by Museums of Old York. Free and open to the public. 12–1 p.m at York Public Library, 15 Long Sands Road in York. For information about the author, visit www.janetmendelsohn.com.

3rd George Marshall Store Gallery Opening Reception. Please join us for an opening reception for the gallery’s winter installation. Mary has installed the gallery with a selection of work; some will be familiar and others will be new to you. It is nice to have a reason to come together during these quieter winter days.
RECEPTION Friday, February 3, 2012 5-7 pm at George Marshall Store Gallery, 140 Lindsay Road, York, Maine, 207-351-1083
EXHIBITION DATES Through April 8, 2012
GALLERY HOURS By chance and appointment

8th & 12th “Let’s Talk About York History” at the Parsons Center. First sessions for 1631 Partners as well as our current and former Trustees. Feb. 8 at 5 p.m. and Feb. 12 at 3 p .m. Please email Laura at development@oldyork.org for more information and to RSVP. (General membership sessions will be held on the 26th and 29th of February – see below.)

17th Tavern Dinner. Traditional hearth cooked meal in a cozy, colonial tavern environment. Menu to be announced. 6-8 p.m. at Jefferds Tavern, 3 Lindsay Road, York. Cost: $30 members / $35 non-members. Reservations are required. Please email Eileen early to reserve your space.

19th Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI, email or call 207-363-4974 ext 13.

26th & 29th “Let’s Talk About York History” Discussion Groups Convene for our Members at the Parsons Center. Feb. 26 at 3 p.m. and Feb. 29 at 5 p.m. Please email Laura at development@oldyork.org for more information and to RSVP. (We have invited our 1631 Partners and current and former Trustees to discussion sessions earlier in February – see above.)

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, headlines, historical societies, Maine, Maine things to do, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

130 Antique Stage Curtains Found in Maine

Here is another roundup of Maine history news headlines! Even though the temps are plunging there is still a lot of activity in the world of Maine history. It appears as though things may be changing in that for moat local societies the winters are becoming less and less of a shuttered organization during the winter months, fortunately.

Bass Harbor lighthouse, Acadia to appear on new quarter

BASS HARBOR, Maine — For the second time in a decade, an iconic Maine lighthouse will soon start appearing in the pockets and pocketbooks of people across the country. Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse on Mount Desert Island will be featured on the back of a U.S. quarter to be issued…

Appraisers’ Roadmap: Navigating the World of Marks
Many might wonder, when watching appraisers on the “Antiques Roadshow,” just how they can determine so much information by simply flipping a porcelain cup, silver platter or glass vase upside down? They are looking for a mark—the appraiser’s seemingly arcane language that is a mystery to the budding collector. Worthologist Mike Wilcox says that once understood, marks can save hours of time and frustration trying to figure out exactly what you are holding in your hands. Need a primer? Mike just happens to have one that gives an overview of what you can find painted or impressed on the underside of most pottery, glass or metal items that can be used to decipher vintage, authenticity and origins of your antiques and collectibles…

Curtains Without Borders finds 130 antique stage curtains in Maine

NORWAY — A stage curtain in Norway Grange 45 on Whitman Street is being documented as part of a regionwide effort by the Vermont organization Curtains Without Borders to conserve and protect stage curtains throughout New England and beyond. Curtains Without Borders Director Christine…

The Virtues of Virtual

As the world becomes more virtual (but not necessarily more virtuous), many museums and historical societies are moving their collections online. The Maine Memory Network, launched by the Maine Historical Society in 2001…

Picturing Portland in the digital age
Oldham, a volunteer with the Maine Historical Society, takes a photo in Portland Friday. The historic block of buildings along Fore Street at Boothby Square, with 340 Fore St. at the far right in the 1924 archival image. The three-year project…

Troy church among most recent additions to National Register of …

The Troy Union Meeting House, built in 1840, has made it to the National Register of Historic Places. The Maine Historic Preservation Commission singled it…

Hines speaks on art restoration

Camden — The historic Conway House’s Maine Living series will host a talk by art restorer Blaikie Hines Sunday, Jan. 8 at 2 pm at the Conway House complex…

Historic photographs at Camden library

Research for the exhibit was conducted by individuals and historical societies … The exhibit was funded by a grant from the Maine Community Foundation and…

Libraries collaborate on Civil War book group

The discussions will be facilitated by Candace Kanes, a historian at the Maine Historical Society, who is provided by the Maine Humanities Council. …

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Fort Williams to be Unearthed?

Dining with Antiques – Christmas Rosettes
In the 1840s and 1850s, Scandinavian settlers brought to the United States the tradition of making an assortment of delicious Christmas cookies using open fireplaces and cast iron implements. Over time, cultures blended into America’s melting pot and traditions became diluted, but these fascinating cookie-making tools can still be found, hidden among the Dutch ovens, skillets and other cast iron miscellany on tables at outdoor flea markets. The items, resembling small branding irons (with screw-on “brands”), are used to make rosettes, a favorite Nordic Christmas treat. Check out Worthologist Liz Holderman’s primer on these vintage kitchen implements, as well as a traditional recipe for those interested in trying to make them. Read “Dining with Antiques – Christmas Rosettes”

History buried at Fort Williams Park


The park’s charitable foundation plans to explore the possibility of uncovering a buried gun battery.

CAPE ELIZABETH – Large interpretive signs help explain Battery Blair to visitors at the town’s Fort Williams ParkJoe Edgar says much more interesting things are under those visitors’ feet. Edgar is a director of the Fort Williams Charitable Foundation, which has raised more than $36,000 for an engineering study to determine whether a buried section of the gun battery — which includes the ammunition magazines, plotting rooms, and space for tool storage, generators and latrines — can stand the stress of being uncovered.

“Spend Christmas in Jail!”

The Ellsworth Historical Society will again be having their annual open house and “Old Fashioned Christmas” with free admission to the museum on December 3, 11:00-3:00 at the home of the Society” The Old Hancock County Jail”, 40 State Street Ellsworth next to the Ellsworth Library.

The 1886 home of the Sherriff will decorated for the holidays with hot mulled cider and cookies. Guests will be welcome to tour the 1886 home of the Hancock County Sherriff’s of the past and see how they spent their day-to-day lives and tending the prisoners in the jail. Guests will also be allowed to tour the Sherriff’s office and the cellblock of so many of our notorious Ellsworth prisoners!

A special exhibit will also be on display “A Soldiers Christmas” that will display military items from the archives of the society as well as items on loan. One very special exhibit we will have this year is a recent donation to the society of a 12 lb British Canon Ball that was shot at a Ellsworth Barn on the Union River believed from the Revolutionary War period. So many Ellsworth boys were not home for the holidays so we felt it was important to show our support and remember the soldiers of Ellsworth at this special time of year.

The society continues its goal of preserving the artifacts of Ellsworth History and as always needs your support. Donations are welcome and may be sent to The Ellsworth Historical Society PO Box 355 Ellsworth, Me 04605. If you have items to donate or any questions, please contact Terri Weed Cormier at 667-8235 or Linda Grindle at 667-5716. The society is currently looking for glass locking display cabinets to display items securely, if you have one to donate please contact us. Thank you and we look forward to seeing you all at the Open House for some cider and cookies and lots of reminiscing about Ellsworth’s past.

Museums of Old York

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

December

3rd Join us this Saturday for A Christmas Tea at Jefferds Tavern.

As a part of the annual Festival of Lights celebration in York Village, Museums of Old York hosts a favorite holiday tradition at historic Jefferds Tavern from noon until 4 p.m. on Sat., Dec. 3. This yuletide fest, managed by volunteer Michele LaBranche, offers traditional Victorian-style holiday cheer to the whole family. Candlelight, a cozy fire, shining silver, delicate teacups and holiday greens set the stage in the Tavern. But the desserts are really the highlight of the afternoon!

Created by local bakers and talented volunteers, this year’s menue of tasty treats includeds: Apple Crisp, Harvest Pumpkin Pie, Cheesecake, Chocolate Cake, Raspberry Almond Pie, Lemon Pie, Fluffy Peanut Butter Pie, and Indian Pudding. Enjoy the ambiance, company of friends and delicious desserts as you warm yourself by the fire. The last sitting will be at 3:30 p.m. Admission is $6 and includes a choice of two desserts and tea. No charge for children under age 5 and no reservation required.

14th Candle Dipping and Holiday Decor. Without electricity how did people light their homes at night? With candles of course! Dip your own candles for when the power goes out this winter or as a centerpiece for a holiday dinner. Create colorful curled candles, string cranberries and make a decoration for your window or Christmas tree. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Registration required, ages 8 and up, $10 ($8 members).

Stories from Maine Memory Network

Bringing in the Swedes

30th Anniversary Celebration, New Sweden, 1900

The settlement of the Swedish colony in Aroostook County in the 1870s is a remarkable story. Political leaders, spurred by the Homestead Act and led by W.W. Thomas, actively recruited Swedish immigrants to northern Maine, both to encourage economic development and to secure the northern border with Canada. By the 1890s, nearly 1,500 Swedish immigrants had settled in Aroostook County and established a vibrant community that remains strong to this day.

View the exhibit from Maine History Online for an overview. To explore the story further, visit the website a local team from New Sweden developed through the Maine Community Heritage Project.

TRAVELIN’ MAINE(RS): Head to New Gloucester and have yourself a Merry Shaker
Kennebec Journal
Shaker Village includes a store with many interesting products, a fascinating museum, a craft store with locally made crafts from lamps to baskets to cheese balls, a farm with sheep and goats and several historical buildings

Farmington Historical Society to sell wreaths
Lewiston Sun Journal
Along with a parade and other activities, the Titcomb House Museum is open from 9:30 am to 3 pm All proceeds support the Farmington Historical Society’s mission of preserving Farmington’s history and maintenance of the Titcomb House and North Church

Schooner Bowdoin’s Untold Story Subject of Upcoming Castine Exhibit
The Maritime Executive (press release)
The untold story of Maine Maritime Academy’s (MMA) historic schooner Bowdoin will be illuminated in an upcoming exhibit at the Castine Historical Society scheduled for the summer of 2012. The exhibit, entitled “Schooner Bowdoin on the Greenland Patrol”

Leeds Historical Society views Harry Cochrane Murals
Lewiston Sun Journal
LEEDS — Members of the Leeds Historical Society met recently at the old Methodist Church on Quaker Ridge with artisan Tony Castro from New Gloucester. Castro has worked for more than 25 years in the field of decorative painting, and some of Maine’s…

Maine fish passage restoration effort get $92K grant
The Republic
Maine Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe says the $92505 grant is going to the Nobleboro Historical Society. Through the years, the towns have undertaken several

Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Museums of Old York, stories, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

WWII Warbirds Flock to Auburn

Hello everyone! I’ve been vacationing, so a lot of news has been missed, but here is another roundup (a long one this time) of Maine history news highlights and headlines from around the state. Lots of exciting things going on, from the visit of some WWII warplanes to the LA municipal airport in Auburn. Also, a lot of events are still happening all over, even though Fall is coming, along with the traditional shuttering of many historical society operating seasons.

As usual, if you have trouble with a link, copy and paste it into your browsers search window to visit the site. And if you have any news to share ot events to schedule, feel free to email them to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com.

I would like to give a shout out this week to Susan Sheffield of Dover Delaware for emailing a couple of excerpts from an issue of the New England Magazine with a story about Thomas B. Reed. It is unusual to find something like that so far from its home area. Thanks Susan!

Journalist/author visits Thomaston Historical
Thomaston — Author Kevin C. Mills will discuss his journey researching his family history to publishing his first novel, “Sons and Daughters of the Ocean,” at the monthly meeting of Thomaston Historical Society at the Knox Farmhouse, 80 Knox St. The…

Author to discuss Civil War regiment from Maine at Heritage Day in Brooks
Brooks — Brooks Historical Society will hold its annual Heritage Day Open House on Sunday, Oct. 9 from 1-4 pm at the Pilley House. New this year will be a featured speaker Peter Dalton of Northport, author of “With Our Faces To The Foe: A History Of…

Bird talks on ‘Rockland, Maine’s Tidal Turn’
Rockland — On Tuesday, Oct. 11 at 6:30 pm, Rockland Public Library will present a talk John Bird on his recent book, “Rockland, Maine’s Tidal Turn.” The talk is co-sponsored by the Rockland Historical Society. Bird has compiled a series of columns…

Clean gravestones with water, elbow grease, gentle brushes
When I hear them talk about their travels — a newly discovered cemetery in Mercer, a historical society meeting in Hope — all I can think of is a pinball machine pinging them around Maine’s graveyards in need. Bill’s slide presentation took us along…

25 things to do this fall — festivals, foliage and fun
See how Mainers from the past two centuries got dressed up at the Maine Historical Society’s fashion in Maine exhibit, which runs into 2012. Hats, jewelry, shoes, hair combs, walking sticks and several complete costumes are on display along with a wide…

Irish lecture series proving to be a hit
A former teacher, he is a member of the Androscoggin Historical Society, Maine Historical Society and the Irish American Club of Maine. He has authored two books, “Early Murphy Descendants of Mary Hurley and James McCarthy” and “Androscoggin Irish…

Hauling History: Jon Hentz to share lobster trap lore
But through personal memory, research and craftsmanship, Hentz has hauled up more than a century’s worth of trap-making that he will present at the Georgetown Historical Society building Tuesday night. The free talk will trace the development from the…

Surprise takes WWII veteran back to old heights

A ride in a historic plane honors a Maine Tuskegee Airman who served his country and came home to face racial bias.

World War II bombers make stop in Auburn

AUBURN — “You see them on TV, but you never really know what they’re like inside,” marveled Russ Allen of Auburn as he made his way slowly through the belly of the B-17G Flying Fortress at the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport on Monday afternoon. Inside, the plane was a…

Wings of Freedom bringing vintage planes to airport

AUBURN — Former New Gloucester resident Tom Driscoll picks up the leather flying jacket that his father, Lt. John Driscoll Sr., wore when he piloted B-17s in the 1940s. The jacket is a family treasure and symbol of the stories that John finally began telling about the war near th…

Old Otisfield Town House may be raised to save historic listing

OTISFIELD — The old Otisfield Town House and the approximate one-half acre of land it sits on may be raised 52 inches so it can retain its listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The wood-frame 1905 building on Bell Hill Road has its original oak chairs and voting booth…

From WorthPoint; Q& A: Talking 125 Years of Coke
This year, Coca-Cola marks the 125th anniversary of the creation of the famous beverage, first introduced as a fountain drink in Atlanta, Ga., in 1886. The popularity of the sparkling refreshment was aided by a merchandising frenzy, as thousands of mass-market advertising collectibles were produced over the years—from promotional items, holiday-themed items and signs—and all proved to be pretty durable, making collecting fairly easy. In that vein of thought, Worthologist Liz Holderman interviews Denis Bardin, the president of the Coca-Cola Collectors Club. Check out what hardcore Coke collectors are looking for these days. Read “Q & A: Talking 125 Years of Coke”

Museums of Old York Events:

October
3 Needle Wizards. Join us every Monday morning as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery at 3 Lindsay Road for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information, email Cindi Young-Gomes at registrar@oldyork.org.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apples, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. Email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Parsons Center. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. Members free. $5 for teens and adults and family rates for non-members.

Maine Historical Society Events:


Tuesday, October 4, 12pm

Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Get in the mood for the World Series with this wonderful new memoir of growing up with the Temple Townies in the 1940s and ’50s. Our Game Was Baseball follows A Soldier’s Son, Hodgkins’ poignant memoir of his childhood in Temple, Maine during World War II. Hodgkins interviews former team members, recounts his own passion for the Townies, and explores the central role the Townies played in the life of this western Maine community.

Friday, October 7, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk: Two Fabulous Fashion Exhibits

Thursday, October 13, 7pm

Book Talk: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light

Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm

Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Categories: antiques, articles, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, preservation, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Mitchell B-25 and the Panchito

This film contains archival footage and video taken by the Remember ME! Media crew at the Great State of Maine Air Show, 2011 in Brunswick Maine. The Panchito is a faithfully restored B-25 medium bomber used in conjunction with the DAV’s outreach program to spread the services available to our veterans in the US.

The purpose of this short film is to tell the story of this fabulous little bomber and the impact that it had on all theaters of the WWII conflict. Primarily utilized in the Pacific Theater, the B-25’s most famous moment was when Lt. Colonel “Jimmy” Doolittle used 16 of these airplanes in a daring sea launched raid over Japan.

Launched 600 miles from Japan from the aircraft carrier the USS Hornet after having been prematurely discovered by the Japanese, these airmen volunteered without exception to carry on with the mission, even though they knew there would be insufficient fuel to carry them to safe bases in China where they could be safely recovered.

All but one plane crashed, and the one surviving plane was confiscated when the pilot landed in Russia.

The plane used in the clips from the movie Aerial Gunner was not actually a B-25, although I had been assured it was. It is actually what was designated a B-34, or more properly a Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon/Ventura. My guess would be that there were no B-25’s available for filming, and this is the closest variant the film company could come up with.

However, the set props were B-25 components for the most part. Remember that Hollywood is Hollywood, and artistic license trumps detail nearly every time.

It was still a great little movie and worth seeing sometime, and can be downloaded in full from the Prelinger Archives, along with miles of other vintage footage.

Enjoy the video!

Categories: antiques, events, historic preservation, history, Maine things to do, museum news, preservation, Uncategorized, WWII | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

Note: If you have problems with the links, simply cut/copy and paste into your browser to open them.

Adelbert Ames and His Recollection of the Attempted Robbery in Northfield

Adelbert Ames was born in Rockland, ME, on Oct. 31, 1835. He graduated West Point Academy in 1861 and was commissioned to the 2nd U.S. Artillery and fought in the First Battle of Bull Run where he earned the Medal of Honor. He was later reassigned to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862 where he fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg…

Hurricanes of New England
Maps are available at the Weare Historical Society if you’d like to walk through … on record as the costliest and deadliest storm in New England history…

Old house requires special, loving care
I have had the privilege of … In the end, they offered the house to the Norway Historical Society…

Audience Calendar
Illustrated Lecture: History of Silk in America, Nancy Greenleaf and Sally Williams, Hiram Historical Society, free. 625-4762. 2:30 pm Saturday. …

Bangor Museum and History Center getting a museum makeover
A week after selling a rare … And with the Massachusetts Historical Society, which already has volumes one …

Three Chums tell tales of friendship at Lovell’s Brick Church Sept. 9
Gilman, a New Hampshire storyteller who periodically wanders into Maine… Baked Bean Awareness Month speaker for the Fryeburg Historical Society. …

Prospect News
The Prospect Historical Society will hold a meeting Sept.12th. in the Town Hall at 7:00 PM. Will be discussing the final Yard Sale at the Marsh School…

Publication on Dover-Foxcroft will be a genealogist’s treasure
The couple has long been involved with the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society and its home at the Observer building. Nancy is former president of MGS, and Jack is the current president. The Maine Genealogical Society produces its special publications …

Six Aroostook County locations renamed to remove racial slurs

It has taken more than 10 years, but recent place name changes approved by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names have removed the final racial slurs from Maine maps. The six locations, all in Aroostook County, are now named Scopan, Scopan Inlet, Scopan Knob, Scopan Lake, …

Archaeologists in Illinois dig to find civilization that vanished

The largest excavation of a prehistoric site in the country is poised to solve a riddle about Illinois prehistory that has lingered for a century — where did the Mississippians go? And why? An enormous dig of a village site first inhabited about 1050 A.D. is providing so much data and so many artifacts that archaeologists are daring to speculate that basic questions about the Mississippians will finally be answered.

~~~

From Museums of Old York:

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

PLEASE NOTE:
The “History Challenge” programs previously scheduled for Thursday, September 1 and Thursday, September 8 at 7 p.m. in The Parsons Center have been cancelled.
Our regular programming and exhibits in The Parsons Center will be suspended from September 1 through September 11 so that we may bring you The Fourth Annual Antiques Show!

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of the Highland Farm area off Rte. 91. Email rbowen@oldyork.org for details and reservations.

19 “The Country Heer is Plentiful” exhibit of Trade, Religion and Warfare and Southern Maine 1631-1745 resumes in the upstairs gallery at The Parsons Center during regular museum hours.

23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Click here to view the scrumptious menu on our website. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany the hearth-cooked meal. Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Seating is limited to twenty and reservations are required. Please email Richard Bowen or call (207) 363-4974 to make your reservation by September 21.

26 Needle Wizards. Every Monday morning starting the 26th of September. Join our Needle Wizards as we socialize while sewing costumes for Old York’s education interpreters. Whether you are good at cutting out patterns, hand-sewing caps, piecing skirts or sewing on the machine, we could use your help. Come to The Parsons Center upstairs in the gallery for an hour or the whole morning. 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. For more information email Cindi at registrar@oldyork.org.

29 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

October

3 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. 7 p.m. at The Parsons Center.

10 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

12 Scarecrow Making. Learn the origins of the scarecrow while you make one to decroate your yard. Bring old clothes to struff with leaves and create a crazy face out of cloth. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Parsons Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the The Parsons Center at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

17 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

19 Fall Fair Day. Join us for traditional fair activities and fall fun! Potato sack and three-legged races, human ox pull, skillet throw, bobbing for apple, leaf diving for treasure and apple cider pressing. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. Ages 6 and up, $8 per child ($6 members). Registration required. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

24 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

26 Pumpkin Carving. Come carve pumpkins in front of the fire! Learn the history of Halloween as you transform your pumpkin into a jack-o-lantern and eat the seeds roasted over the open fire. Bring your own pumpkin. Knives, newspaper and cleanup will be provided. 3-5 p.m. at The Parsons Center. All ages are welcome. $5 suggested donation. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween — Where Facts are Scarier than Fiction! Join a tour of historic ghosts starting at The Parsons Center and traveling through the buildings and grounds at Old York. For the young or skittish, we offer storytelling in Jefferds Tavern and spooky games in the Remick Barn. 6 – 8 p.m. All ages are welcome. $5 for teens and adults/ $15 for families. Registration encouraged. Email education@oldyork.org to sign up.

31 Needle Wizards. Every Monday from 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. upstairs at The Parsons Center. See above and email registrar@oldyork.org for more information.

~~~

From the Maine Historical Society:

MHS News

New Exhibit Explores One Way High Fashion Came to Maine

The new exhibit in the Lecture Hall Gallery, “Having in Paris a Great Success”: French Fashion, 1928-1936, features sheets from Paris fashion houses that demonstrate one source of fashion inspiration for well-to-do women in Maine during the 1920s and 30s. The sheets, which are drawn from MHS’s Mildred G. Burrage Collection, include beautiful hand-drawn illustrations of the latest styles and fabric samples.

This show is mounted in conjunction with Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In, our current museum exhibit.


Fall Program Highlights

Tuesday, October 4, 12pm
Book Talk: Our Game Was Baseball

Presenter: John Hodgkins, Author

Thursday, October 13, 7pm
Book Event: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light Presenter: Jane Brox, Author

Saturday, October 15, 1-4pm
Maine Home Movie Day with Northeast Historic Film

Wednesday, October 26, 7pm

Book Event: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

Presenter: Colin Woodard, Author

Thursday, November 10, 7pm
In Partnership with the Colonial Dames in Maine
Tales from an Art Detective: Tracing Nazi-era Provenance at the MFA

Presenter: Victoria Reed, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Categories: antiques, archeology, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, Geneology, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, indians, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ponce’s Landing, Long Island

Headlines and articles on Maine history news

Historic Town House to hold unveiling ceremony in Dixmont

DIXMONT, Maine — An unveiling ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, at the historic Dixmont Town House, 702 Western Avenue in Dixmont. A historic marker recently was provided and installed at the Dixmont Town House by Central Maine Power Co. The Dixmont Historical Society invites the public to attend the ceremonies. Refreshments will be served. The Town House will be open to view the work that has been done to save the historic building, and members of the Historical Society Committee will be on hand to discuss future plans. For more information, call 234-2271.

Chamberlain Days kicks off Thursday
BRUNSWICK — The Pejepscot Historical Society will sponsor Chamberlain Days, a series of lectures, workshops, and other Civil War related programs for the general public. Programming begins at 7 pm Thursday in the Morrell Meeting Room at Curtis…

Holy History! Churches share stories
The editors were made up of people who had writing skills as well as a knowledge of local history, said historical society Member Sallie Huot, who was one of the editors, as well as the writer of the chapter on the history of Trinity Episcopal Church…

Work of 1800s itinerant artist focus of talk, tours
These are the pastoral views painted on the walls of local historic homes by artist Rufus Porter. History buffs and art admirers attended the Aug. 6 Townsend Historical Society “Porter Landscape School Murals: a Talk and Tour,” led by Rufus Porter…

Historic Orono mill torn asunder as town makes way for condo project

ORONO, Maine — When an excavator’s grapple peeled part of the roof off the old Webster Mill on Monday evening, the crowd that had gathered to watch the demolition of the more than 130-year-old building let out a cheer. The cheers grew louder when the grapple came down on the…

‘Sacred ground’ of Popham settlement commands archaeologist’s attention

PHIPPSBURG, Maine — Dr. Jeffrey Brain sat on a boulder at the edge of a nondescript field near the mouth of the Kennebec River, enjoying the view. Fishing boats puttered by in the swirling currents, cutting through blazes of sunshine cast up by the rippling water. A clam harvester donning…

An island prison: Rugged St. Croix Island brought ghastly death to early settlers

Editor’s Note: This is the first of three stories examining Maine’s historic role in the settling of the New World. The other two parts will run Monday and Tuesday. ROBBINSTON, Maine — When French settlers set out to claim parts of the New World at the turn of the 17th…

States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards
Looking for a fun collection that won’t break the bank or something for your children to collect? Worthologist Bonnie Wilpon says that one collection that’s easy to start while on vacation is state humor postcards, which can be found in gas stations, restaurants, hotels, airports and local shops, in addition to postcard shows and on online collecting sites for when you get back home. While every state likes to poke fun at itself and its residents, there are some jokes that transcend state boarders: Can you guess what “bird” is claimed by 30 different states as their “official” winged denizen? Bonnie will show you some examples. Read “States Poke Fun at Themselves through Postcards”

‘Clipperways’ to be razed

The 113-year-old home has been called ‘the jewel of Prouts Neck.’ The new owner will build another house…

Museum News:

Museums of Old York

Upcoming Programs
For a complete and up-to-date calendar please see our website.

August

19, 26 Hearth Cooking Demonstrations. Join our Tavern Mistress and the Junior Docent ladies from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Visitor Center at Remick Barn as they prepare colonial fare, creating a full meal using 18th-century recipes and techniques over the open fire. Stop in Fridays around 3:00 p.m. to taste what’s been created. Hearth cooking demonstrations are free with a ticket to at least one of the Museum buildings.

25 History Brought to Life. Watch the history of the Old Gaol come to life as amateur actors portray the prisoners kept under lock and key. Listen to stories of thievery, debt, embezzlement, murder and escape! Meet the Gaol keeper responsible for keeping these scofflaws locked away and his wife who cooked for and fed them. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates.

September

18 Lost York: The History that Nature Has Reclaimed. Join Old York staff for a guided tour of areas outside the village proper. Email Richard Bowen for more information.
23 Dinner at Jefferds Tavern. Don’t let the end of summer get you down! Dinner at the Tavern can be the perfect antidote to the blues of shorter days. Enjoy the best of the harvest season in the charming candlelit rooms of the 18th century. Guests are encouraged to bring their own beverages to accompany their hearth-cooked meal.Friday, September 23, 6–8 p.m. $30 per person ($25 members). Reservations required. Email Richard Bowen for more information.

29 History Brought to Life. Meet at the Old Gaol. Program ongoing from 5:30 -7:30 p.m. Members free and nominal fee for non-members. Family rates. See above for more info.

October

6 Who Discovered York? Observe Columbus Day in a different way by learning about the several “discoveries” of York from the 1630s – 1900s. Thursday, October 6, 7 p.m. Remick Barn.
15 Marketfest! The Museums of Old York will be a busy place Saturday October 15th from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jefferds Tavern will be open to the public for $1. Visitors can watch the Tavern Mistress cook a full meal over the open fire, enjoy traditional crafters, and check out our new upstairs exhibit on WWII home front efforts. Outside of Jefferds Tavern children and adults can help press apples into cider, enjoy home baked goods and have fun making a rag doll at our kids table. The Remick Barn Visitors Center will be open for $1 with the upstairs exhibit on life in 17th century York, titled “The country heer is plentiful”, open all day. Downstairs people can view the pies entered in our Autumn Pies pie contest, or have their photo taken in costume in our Old Time Photo Booth. The pies will be judged in the Remick Barn at 2 p.m. The 1719 Old Gaol will be open all day so people can see the original stone cells and learn about the prisoners incarcerated within. For $1 join us at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., or 3 p.m. to watch theatrical prisoner performances and hear stories told by the jail keeper! If you would like to enter a pie in the Autumn Pies contest, or are interested in volunteering at the Museum for Marketfest, please email education@oldyork.org.

29 Haunted Historical Halloween. For the third year in a row, Old York invites you to meet the ghosts of the long-departed residents of the local area. Look for details in September. Saturday, October 29, 6 – 8 p.m.

Maine Historical Society


Monday-Friday, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: Innocent Interlude, Scenes of Life in Portland, Maine 1940-41

Take a tour of Portland in the early 1940s through this remarkable series of color films made by city officials. (60 minutes) More info

Wednesday, August 24, 11am

Family Tour of the Wadsworth-Longfellow House More info

Thursday, August 25, 11am

The Longfellow Trail: An Urban Expedition: Guided walking tour through downtown Portland More info

Saturday, August 27, 2pm

FILM SCREENING: The Dave Astor Show Visits Jordan’s Meats

In this episode recorded in 1962 (the only episode of the Dave Astor Show that still exists), Dave and his students celebrate the opening of the new Jordan’s Meats plant in Portland with song, dance, and lots of fun. (60 minutes) More info

Penobscot marine Museum

Greetings From Hampden: Selections from the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Collection: Slide talk by Kevin Johnson, Photo Archivist. Sponsored by Hampden Historical Society. At Kinsley House, 83 Main Rd., So. Hampden, ME. For more information: hampdenmaine.com or 207-862-2027, Aug. 22, 7 p.m.

Historic Photos of Jonesport: Kevin Johnson will show historic images of Jonesport and environs from the Eastern Illustrating Collection. At Peabody Memorial Library, 162 Main Street, Jonesport, ME. For more information: 207-497-5644. Aug. 25, 7 p.m.

Shadowbox Workshop: Learn how to make dioramas inspired by the work of Anne-Emmanuelle Marpeau. At the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine. To register, contact Susan Henkel: 207-548-2529 ext.202. Sept. 17, 9 a.m.

And We’ll Be Exhibiting at:

Belfast Harbor Fest, Aug. 20

Camden Windjammer Festival, Sept. 2-4

Common Ground Fair, Sept. 23-25

~~~

Today’s postcard pick shows both Ponce’s and Trefethen’s Landing on Long Island, just outside Portland Harbor. Roberta Gomez Ricker has a story called At the Base of Ponce’s Landing in our new book, Salt & Pines, available through your local bookseller or online at History Press. It is a fine story that describes not only some of the hardships island living presents, but some of the joys life on one of Maine’s islands can bring as well. Islanders are a special kind of people, and this story will help at least one tale live on when all else has been forgotten. You may have caught the piece on the book in this past Sunday’s Portland Press’ Audience section, but if not head on over and check it out here. Volume two is just about ready to go, with just some minor editing and image placements remaining, and I’m currently accepting submissions for volume three. If you’d like to learn more, email your questions to me at editor@remembermemedia.com

Categories: antiques, Art Exhibit, articles, Books, breaking news, collectibles, events, headlines, historic buildings, historic preservation, historical societies, history, Maine, Maine Historical Society, Maine things to do, museum news, Museums of Old York, Penobscot Marine Museum, Salt andPines project, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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