A week of Shipwrecks

The anniversary of the wreck of the Titanic was this past Tuesday, April 10, and there has been no lack of interest on this subject. TV specials were all over the place, as well as movies, interviews of researchers, lectures and more could be found all across the state. There were events held in many of Maine’s historical societies, from the mother ship on down.

The picture to the left of the Titanic is from The Loss of the SS Titanic, by Lawrence Beesley, published in 1912. You can download the book by clicking onto the title.

I have a few headlines to share today, as well as a MHS event and an excellent article on selling your collections by Harry Rinker. A link to the story can be found at the end of the blurb. Enjoy, and don’t forget to remember our service men and women on Monday, which is also Patriots Day.

Shipwrecks highlighted during next Belfast Historical Society meeting
Johansen is the publisher of Maine Coastal News, a monthly publication dedicated to covering the waterfront of the state of Maine. He has a lifelong interest in shipwrecks and maritime history. Belfast Historical Society meetings are free and open to

Stow Historical Society Chowd’a Fest April 14
First Annual Stow Historical Society Chowd’a Fest will be held Saturday, April 14, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm snow or shine at Saco Valley Fire Station (Route 113 in North Fryeburg). A challenge has been extended to the Cold River Valley and

‘Field School’ allows study of archaeological dig
Students, teachers and history buffs interested in archaeology have an opportunity this summer to join a field school led by archaeologist Neill De Paoli and sponsored by the Old Berwick Historical Society

A child’s account of the Titanic retold in Portland
Author and St. Joseph’s College Professor of Education Karen Marks Lemke speaks about the ill-fated Titanic at the Maine Historical Society on Tuesday, April 10, 2012. The ship sank 100 years ago this week…

New book upcoming on Isles of Shoals
An upcoming book about the Isles of Shoals off the New Hampshire and Maine coasts traces 6000 years of history at one of the tiny islands. Author and historian J. Dennis Robinson says 250000 artifacts were unearthed on rocky Smuttynose

Maine Historical Society

Thursday, April 19, 7pm

The Civil War of 1812

Speaker: Dr. Alan Taylor, University of California, Davis

This year marks the bicentennial of the War of 1812, a formative event in both Maine and U.S. history and the subject of Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Alan Taylor’s new book. Join us to learn more! This program is part of the Richard D’Abate Lectures: Conversations About History, Art, and Literature. Series details.

To see a full list of upcoming programs, please click here.

Rinker on Collectibles: Advice on Selling a Collection
When starting a collection, it’s all fun and games and the thrill of the hunt, locating that missing or surprising treasure that will no doubt be the group’s centerpiece. But at some point, when the collection becomes more of a hindrance than a hobby, a decision will be made to sell it off. When selling any collections, especially if assembled after 1980, there are several truths a seller has to face, says Worthologist Harry Rinker. Unfortunately, all have a “bad news” aspect and run counter to what the collector believes deep in his/her heart. Harry has some advice for those who decide to go through with the sale. Does it apply to you and your collection? Read “Rinker on Collectibles: Advice on Selling a Collection”

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Categories: articles, collectibles, headlines, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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