L.L. Bean: The stuff of legend

Headlines have been kind of sparse lately, so I have decided to add some material beyond the front pages and event listings in the next few posts. You can still email your events and news that you would like to share at the same old address: editor@remembermemedia.com though.

LL Bean in Freeport is celebrating their 100th anniversary this year and it looks like there will be lots of excitement and a good number of events to spread the pride of reaching that milestone. 100 years is a long time for a business to be open, and I extend my hand in congratulations for their success, and wish them another 100 years. The papers will be full of articles the next few months with lots of information and articles on the birth and growth of this company.

Of course, as we all know, Leo Leonwood Bean designed his first hunting shoe in 1911 because he, like so many of us, was sick and tired of having wet, cold, and aching feet when returning home from his jaunts in the woods. He had some leather tops sewn to a pair of rubbers, and the rest is history. The Bean ad here lists a service whereby a hunter could send in any old pair of boots, and LL Bean’s craftsmen would clean them up, sew on a pair of rubbers and add new laces for the exorbitant cost (at the time) of just $3.40. Bean’s 100th anniversary hunting shoe lists for $139.00 in their catalog. What a difference a century makes!

L.L. Bean: The stuff of legend

FREEPORT — In the rear of a plain-looking white house — not far from the crush of shoppers at L.L. Bean’s retail complex — reside the relics of the company’s century-long history.

Racks of vintage wool coats hang alongside antique fishing poles and knapsacks. L.L. Bean-brand dinnerware sold in the 1950s is here. So are the original paintings used for the covers of Eisenhower-era L.L. Bean catalogs…

History’s hidden in the floorboards

MAPLE GROVE – This small Quaker church just two miles from the Canadian border was likely the last stop on the Underground Railroad for many runaway slaves making their way to freedom, according to historians in the Fort Fairfield area. But it isn’t always easy to find references to it among historical accounts of the Underground Railroad, which helped tens of thousands of slaves gain freedom before slavery was abolished in 1865.

Those who helped the slaves faced jail and heavy fines, so they didn’t tend to leave written records of what they did…

Family history workshop offered at Counting House Museum

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — A public workshop called Researching and Writing Your Family’s History will be held on the second floor of the Counting House Museum at 1 p.m. March 4.

Presented by author Joseph Hardy with genealogist Beth Tykodi, the event is free for members of the Old Berwick Historical Society, and new members are welcome to join at the door. A one-year membership donation is $20 per person or $30 for a family.

Hardy, whose book, “Four American Stories: Emigration and the Lure of the West,” was published this year, will explain how he discovered and developed the stories of his and his wife’s grandparents and their ancestors. He describes his book…

County man collects chain saws of all shapes, styles and colors

ALLAGASH, Maine — Anyone who has spent any time at all in the Maine woods is familiar with the sounds of a gas-powered chain saw. The constant buzz of a saw is the soundtrack to timber operations, woodlot maintenance and firewood gathering. It’s also music to the ears

 

From the Maine Historical Society

Friday, March 2, 5-8pm

First Friday Art Walk: Take to the Streets

Join us for a festive evening at MHS! Exhibits on display include Take to the Streets! in the Shettleworth Lecture Hall, Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In: Adornment & Identity in Maine in our main gallery, and fantastic work by students in our Local History, Local Schools program in the Showcase Gallery.

Tuesday, March 6, 12pm

Longfellow’s Shadow: A reading of poems by Wesley McNair and Betsy Sholl

Join us to kick off our Richard D’Abate program series with readings by two Maine Poet Laureates. In his tenure at MHS, D’Abate, himself a poet, has embraced MHS’s Longfellow legacy as an opportunity to incorporate literature, the arts, and culture as vital elements of a Maine history that is broadly told and understood. The poets’ readings will reflect themes in Longfellow’s poetry, his stance as a poet, and his attitude toward the social issues of his time.

March Programs at Old York (From their March 2012 newsletter)

2nd Curator’s Potluck. Join us as we thank last year’s donors to our collections. Bring your appetite and a favorite dish to share. 5:30 p.m. at the Parsons Center. FMI and to RSVP to 207-363-4974 ext. 20 or email Cynthia Young-Gomes.

13th Stories, Stones and Superstitions — Author Talk at York Public Library. New England’s burying grounds are often called outdoor museums – full of history, art and chronicles of religious beliefs, genealogy, sometimes tragedy and scandal – even humor. Author Roxie Zwicker’s presentation will provide an explanation of the symbolism and special language of gravestones and further explore the attitudes and customs about death that these historic artifacts reflect. Focusing on early New England grave markers and their carvers, this illustrated program promises to be informative as well as entertaining and should make you look at area gravestones with new insight and appreciation. Books and artwork will be on sale after the presentation. Program co-sponsored by York Public Library and Museums of Old York. Noon at York Library, 15 Long Sands Road, York. Call 207-363-2818

18th Blue Grass Jam with Kevin Dyer and Friends. Join this lively bunch on the third Sunday of (almost) every month from 1-4 p.m. at The Parsons Center at Museums of Old York, 3 Lindsay Road, York. $4 donation appreciated. FMI: email or call 207-363-4974

25th Andrea Quartet at the Parsons Center. Come listen to beautiful classical music by Haydn, Dvorak and Grainger at the Remick Barn. Learn about the composers and their work from violinists Augusto Salazar and Theresa Carr; violist Katie Backus; and cellist Michael Danielski. 3 Lindsay Road, York; 2 p.m. Ticket Prices: Adult $10, Student $5, Family $25.To purchase tickets stop by the museum office or call 207-363-4974 ext. 14.

31st Tap, Tap, Tap….. A Special Jefferds Tavern Dinner Fundraiser! Celebrate the very end of winter and help us raise funds for the winterization and restoration of Jefferds Tavern. A much beloved historic building, the Tavern continues to be a focal point in York Village and is used year-round for the Museum’s educational programs, Tavern Dinners and the annual Christmas Tea. The building stands as a shining example of how a group of concerned people can protect history while at the same time making a building relevant to the community. Today the tavern needs insulation, new clapboards, and “buttoning up” so that it can be used throughout the winter months with energy efficiency. Once this work is completed, there will be no better or more charming location for bridge parties, sewing groups, poetry readings, book clubs, tavern dinners, and the new educational programs for both children and adults. Watch for your invitation in the mail in early March. At the Parsons Center, 3 Lindsay Road, York Village, 6:30 p.m. for wine and hors d’oeuvres, 7:30 p.m. for dinner; $125 per person; RSVP by March 23, 2012; FMI call 207-363-4974 ext. 13 or email Laura Dehler.

Collecting a Hero for the Ages: A Look at Flash Gordon
Long before “Star Trek” and “Star Wars” captivated audiences with their imaginative tales of heroes, villains, alien creatures and travel to other galaxies, science-fiction fans were enthralled by the gallant exploits of the fearless space adventurer, Flash Gordon. Created by artist and cartoonist Alex Raymond, the dashing, blond-haired hero has been traveling to the strange planets, meeting a host of unusual beings and bizarre creatures, and battling the planet Mongo’s evil ruler, Ming the Merciless, for 78 years. As one of the science-fiction genre’s earliest and most popular creations, Flash Gordon was also one of the first…

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Categories: antiques, articles, headlines, history, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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