Antique Appraisals & the Civil War in the News

Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions about Appraisals
Appraisers are often asked questions about how the appraisal process works and whether an appraisal is even needed. Worthologist Liz Holderman rounds up the most frequently asked questions (FAQs) and gives some quick and easy answers, including how an appraiser knows what your collection is worth, why appraisers need to know why you want an appraisal, whether your baseball-card collection is covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy and how the Internet changed the value of collectibles. See if your questions are answered here, and if not, ask away in the comments section. Liz will be glad to reply.Read “Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions about Appraisals”

Who fired first Civil War shot? A dispute in Fla.

A raid 150 years ago by Confederate sympathizers on a Union fort at what is now Pensacola Naval Air Station was likely little more than an ill-planned and drunken misadventure, perhaps ended by one soldier’s warning shot — and a blank one, at that. But don’t tell Pensacola residents that the Jan. 8, 1861, skirmish meant nothing — the event is the stuff of legend in this military town. Some even claim the clash was the Civil War’s first, three months before the battle on April 12, 1861, at South Carolina’s Fort Sumter, which is widely recognized as the start of the war. Dale Cox, the unofficial historian for the Florida Panhandle chapter of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, wrote on his blog that he considers the Pensacola shot the first of the Civil War, saying in an interview that it marked the first time federal troops fired toward Confederate agitators….

How We’ve Commemorated the Civil War

Take a look back at how Americans have remembered the civil war during significant anniversaries of the past… Read More »
also read;
The Civil War at 150 »

Poll: 4 in 10 Southerners Still Side With Confederacy

A century and a half after the opening shots of the U.S. Civil War, nearly four in 10 Southerners say they still sympathize with the Confederacy. That’s according to a new CNN poll released on the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, when Union soldiers raised a U.S. flag over Fort Sumter in South Carolina and the opening shots of the war rang out. The poll’s results reveal that the war that divided the nation for four years still divides American public opinion today. In the South, 38 percent of respondents said they sympathize with the Confederacy, which lost the bloody war. More than 600,000 American soldiers on both sides were killed. Overall, the number from all geographic areas who said they still side with the South is less than a quarter….

How Civil War Photography Changed War

Civil War photographers completely changed popular perceptions of modern warfare. We’ve all seen photographs of the Civil War: black-and-white images of bearded Union generals or mustachioed Confederate colonels posing to one side of the camera, dead bodies stacked on the battlefield or common soldiers around a camp tent. Looking back 150 years to the start of the Civil War this month, what impact did photography have on the war? On the people who lived during the time? What do these images tell us today about the soldiers and their families?

Historic Structures at Fort Davis National Historic Site Threatened by Major Wildfires

We’ve grown accustomed to media coverage of property threatened by raging wildfires in California, but… West Texas? Large fires that raced across the high desert last weekend caused major damage in the small town of Fort Davis. Thus far, the key historic structures at Fort Davis National Historic Site have escaped, but it’s been a close call, and fires continue to burn in the vicinity. Fort Davis National Historic Site preserves perhaps the best example of an Indian Wars’ frontier military post in the Southwest, and the rugged terrain adds to the fort’s appeal for modern-day visitors. That terrain, combined with severe drought and fierce winds, contributed to some of the worst fires in Texas history in recent days. Last weekend, the Rock House Fire burned over 108,000 acres in the region, including more than 106 acres of pinion-juniper, brush and grass in the higher elevation area of Fort Davis National Historic Site. The area affected is on the west side of the park, and includes land just acquired by the NPS in January….

Artifacts And Archives From Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Heading South For Safekeeping

Sometime this summer a truck, or trucks, loaded with artifacts and papers at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in Montana, will slowly pull away from the monument and set out on a 20-or-so-hour drive south. When the truck, or trucks, pull into the National Park Service’s Western Archaeological and Conservation Center in Tucscon, Arizona, workers will unload roughly 150,000 artifacts and archives tied in some fashion to the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry’s darkest days in June 1876…

Reenactments Highlight Fort Sumter Battle Anniversary Commemoration

One hundred and fifty years ago this Tuesday, April 12, the first salvos of the Civil War were launched when Confederate forces began a 34-hour bombardment that ended with the surrender of Fort Sumter. “The firing upon that fort will inaugurate a civil war greater than any the world has yet seen,” declared Robert Toombs, Confederate secretary of state, not long before the conflict began. Despite the lack of fatalities (except for two that a surrender ceremony accident produced), the siege on the Union fort on Charleston Harbor in South Carolina commenced

4 ways we’re still fighting the Civil War

He stood 5-foot-8 and weighed 145 pounds. His face was gaunt and sunburned. Ticks, fleas and lice covered his body. Before battle, his lips would quiver and his body went numb. When the shooting started, some of his comrades burst into maniacal laughter. Others bit the throat and ears of their enemy. And some were shattered by shells so powerful that tufts of their hair stuck to rocks and trees. Take a tour of a Civil War battlefield today, and it’s difficult to connect the terrifying experience of an average Civil War soldier — described above from various historical accounts — with the tranquil historic sites where we now snap pictures today. But you don’t have to tour a battlefield to understand the Civil War. Look at today’s headlines. As the nation commemorates the 150th anniversary of its deadliest war this week, some historians say we’re still fighting over some of the same issues that fueled the Civil War.

Maine’s historic churches presentation May 4

Union Historical Society will present a program on “Maine’s Historic Churches” on Wednesday May 4 at 7:30 pm in the Old Town House, Town House Road, Union. Christi A. Mitchell, architectural historian with the Maine Historic Preservation …

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Categories: antiques, articles, breaking news, civil war, collectibles, events, headlines, historic preservation, historical societies, history, preservation, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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