General Knox and Historical Maine Buildings

Well, I’m back to blogging about Maine history again. For reasons that I won’t mention here, search engine problems drove my ranking to the bottom of the heap. But changes have been made, and hopefully people will begin to find me again. I’ve also decided to change the format of my posting as well, so don’t be surprised that things just don’t seem the same around here anymore.

Fund hike keeps University of Maine museum entry free, an article in the Bangor Daily news relates a good story regarding the UofM’s Art museum. Apparently the Machias Savings Bank has increased its annual gift to the museum to $7500 allowing the museum to offer free admission throughout 2010. Kudos to the Machias Savings Bank for their gift and caring for the arts.

We also saw this past weekend the ending of a piece of Maine history as the last two P3 Orion’s left the Brunswick Naval Air Base ending 60 years of patrolling the Eastern Seaboard and helping to protect our seaways. The base, originally used as a training and stop off base during WWII for US, British and Canadian air force planes, was temporarily closed after the war ended before being converted to Naval use. At its normal level of use, BNAS provided homes and work for about 4,000 employees and their families, providing a great opportunity for the mid coast area by way of economic stability. Too bad the base closed, we’ll miss the Navy greatly.

Champlain’s Valley Voice has a good piece regarding Maine’s own General Henry Knox in From Fort Ticonderoga to Boston: The Wintry Trek of Henry Knox. The story relates to Knox’s efforts to relocate 60 tons of artillery from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston in 1775. WABI has a nice video piece regarding the historic Liberty Hall in Machiasport as the historic Restored Belvedere Tower
cupola was returned to the top of its bell tower. It’s amazing how some of the restoration takes place on these historic properties with all of the details and work it takes to return Maine’s beautiful architecture to where it once was.

Foster’s Daily Democrat reports that tours are now being offered at the historic Hurd Mansion on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 1 to 3 PM at a cost of ten dollars per person. Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., was quoted in the article as saying the Hurd Manor was “the most outstanding example of its style in southern Maine and nowhere in the state does a more impressive Queen Anne—Eastlake residence exist.” The paper also reports that the Sanford
Mill yard makes the National Register,
as the historic property was recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Yard was established by Thomas Goodall in 1867 and became a major source of employment and industry in the area, until it was sold off by Burlington Industries in 1955.

Another couple of interesting articles related to Maine history in that same paper are Ski Museum of Maine and North Berwick Historical Society holding ‘Fireside Chat’
and Funds sought for historic exhibit at North Berwick’s Olde Woolen Mill complex. Ever noticed that some papers place more interest in history than others? I think it’s important to realize that there really is a lot of activity in the preservation and sharing of history here in Maine, but the bulk of it goes on behind the scenes, relatively unnoticed by the public. Fosters Daily Democrat is just one paper that gives these projects and news the coverage they deserve. Three cheers for Fasters, and I hope they can continue with their efforts in these days of closing newspapers.

As I gear up for the coming year, I’ve decided to do my column on a weekly basis which will give me more time to get around and visit. Writing as much as I do consumes a lot of time, so I really need to begin concentrating on various projects, and some of these projects will be terminated. However, I’m still here, and things will progress. If you have some news you’d like to share, enter it into the comments or email it to me at editor@touringmaineshistory.com and I’ll consider including it. Also, if you have a link to place on the links page, or an event for the events page, please feel free to email the information to me at the same address.

Advertisements
Categories: Art Exhibit, events, historic buildings, historic preservation, history, Maine, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: