Maine History News…Events…

Today’s show at 10:30 on Blogtalk radio will be about Maine history news, and we will be talking about The wreck of the HMS Victory, Black History Month, and most especially, ‘The Day The Music Died’ remembering the death of Buddy Holly, Rithchie Valens and the Big Bopper J.P. Richardson…….

Effort to build replica vessel still in progress

BATH — One thing Fred Hill knows for certain: If you don’t build it, they won’t come. The Arrowsic resident is leading a renewed effort to construct a replica of what is believed to be the first boat constructed in Maine. Popham Colony settlers launched the Virginia in 1607 at the mouth of the Kennebec River, in what is now Phippsburg. Momentum to build the boat stalled last summer, when members of the board of the nonprofit organization Maine’s First Ship voted to give up the effort and turn over most of the money they had raised for the project to the Maine Maritime Museum and the Maine State Museum. Hill and others……

Discovery of British Shipwreck Solves Centuries-Old Mystery

LONDON, Feb. 2 — American salvagers announced Monday the discovery of the wreckage of the HMS Victory, one of the most important ships in British naval history, at least 60 miles from where historians have long believed it sank. Generations of researchers have puzzled over the loss of the Victory, which sank in 1744 carrying a crew of more than 1,000, more than 100 brass cannons, and four tons of gold it was transporting from Portugal. Most historians have said the wreckage of the ship had to lie close to the Channel Islands, near the French coast, where Adm. John Balchin was believed to have fatally steered it onto rocky shoals.………….

Americans find sunken British ship but little of its $1 billion cargo

American salvagers say they have discovered the long-sought wreck of the HMS Victory, the mightiest and most technologically advanced warship of its time, which sank during a violent storm in the English Channel in 1744. Armed with as many as 110 massive bronze cannons and carrying a crew of 900 men and 100 supernumeraries, Victory was lost with all hands and a treasure of gold bullion whose value is estimated at $1 billion. In a news conference Monday in London, Greg Stemm, chief executive of Odyssey Marine Exploration of Tampa, Fla., said the company found the remains in 330 feet of water more than 60 miles south of where it was thought to have sunk — exonerating Capt. Sir John Balchin from the widespread charges that he had let it run aground due to faulty navigation…..

‘Do you recall what was revealed’ the day Buddy Holly died?

Fifty years later, it’s known as “the day the music died.” But Peter Bachelder remembers Feb. 3, 1959, as the day a talented musician, whom he had seen less than a year earlier in Lewiston, died in a plane crash. “When I saw him, he was riding the crest of three or four hits, and he didn’t necessarily stand out as one of the icons of the era,” said Bachelder, 68, of Ellsworth. “He seemed pretty serious-minded on stage. He didn’t whip up the crowd. I think it was after he died that people realized we had lost a talent that was just beginning to emerge.”………

Holly’s Maine show stirs memories of unassuming rock era

Pop stars today charter jets, play giant civic arenas and symphony halls and stay in top-flight hotels.
But in the 1950s, rock stars traveled by bus, had to share billing with maybe a dozen other acts and played just about any town that would have them.
That was the case when Buddy Holly played the only known Maine show of his career, on May 5, 1958, at the Lewiston Armory.

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