Maine History News…Events…

Historic temple for sale as Masons’ ranks dwindle
A half-century ago, hundreds of men would enter the side door of an office building in downtown Portland and don uniforms complete with ostrich-plume chapeaus and ceremonial swords.

Stately mansion in Augusta on the market
A large piece of the city’s and state’s history is for sale – figuratively and literally.
The Gov. John F. Hill House at 136 State St. – home to a conference center and multiple Catholic Charities Maine services – is for sale for $1.3 million.

Local developer to renovate historic Col. John Brewer home
Local developer Charlie Milan recently purchased a piece of the city’s history, and is planning to renovate it so it can survive into the future.
Milan purchased a historic home at 609 S. Main St., which history buffs and some locals believe was built by Col. John Brewer, the city’s founder.

Maine Historical Society event…

Saturday, October 18, 10:30am – 12:30pm
Portland Chinese-American Walking Trail

Join us to explore the history of Chinese-Americans in downtown Portland.
While Portland has never had a “Chinatown,” the area around Congress Street used to be home to a small but thriving Chinese community and many Chinese-owned businesses including “deluxe” restaurants, laundries, groceries, and gambling dens.

Historian and former MHS Trustee Gary Libby-who has been a leader in recent efforts to re-discover and document Maine’s rich Chinese heritage-will give a brief talk at MHS and lead a half-mile walking tour that points out and describes these key sites.

The program will end with lunch at the Oriental Table restaurant on Exchange Street.
Registration required; please call 207-774-1822.
Fee: $15.00; Members $10.00.
Lunch not included in program fee.

Event Information
When: Saturday, October 18, 2008, 10:30am – 12:30pm
Where: Maine Historical Society,489 Congress Street, Portland
For more information call 207-774-1822 or email info@mainehistory.org

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Categories: historic buildings, Maine, Maine Historical Society, preservation | Tags: , | Leave a comment

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